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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 4:03pm
Story Fedora vs. Ubuntu srlinuxx 1 02/07/2013 - 9:56am
Story Contributing to FOSS Projects, a counterpoint srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 3:54am
Story So wheezy is fun.. srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 3:52am
Story ALT Linux 7.0 Enterprise and Workstation Arrive srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 3:50am
Story Ubuntu's Mir plans cause divisions srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 1:06am
Story Getting started with GIMP srlinuxx 02/07/2013 - 12:55am
Story Ubiquitous Linux: It’s Everywhere srlinuxx 01/07/2013 - 10:05pm
Story The Linux Kernel: Drivers srlinuxx 01/07/2013 - 10:03pm
Story What’s Your Take on the GPL? srlinuxx 01/07/2013 - 10:02pm

Sun opens up OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

matt asay: Jim Parkinson of Sun has been listening to critiques of OpenOffice's governance policies and responds with a post that suggests that Sun plans to address the problems. Specifically, Sun will be using the Sun Contributor Agreement (SCA) for code contributed to OpenOffice.

Wikipedia Censors Ubuntu CE!

Filed under
Ubuntu

whatwouldjesusdownload: Unfortunately the Ubuntu CE Wikipedia entry has been removed. The entry is now redirected to a list of Ubuntu based derivatives which, ironically, all still have their own pages on Wikipedia.

Release Day - All Hell Breaks Loose

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Yesterday we released openSUSE 10.3, and we are pretty impressed what happened. Some rough numbers:

UK culture holding back open source

Filed under
OSS

vnunet.com: Industry experts have identified cultural, as well as technical, factors affecting the take up of open source software in the UK. Many countries in the European Union are showing enthusiastic support for open source, while support in the US is less strong.

Starting from a review of CentOS 5 LiveCD...

Filed under
Linux

beranger: I happened to read Is CentOS 5.0 Worth Every Penny? and this made me even grumpier. How smart have you to be to try a LiveCD under VMWare? Why is it live if not for being able to test it "for real", with direct contact with your real hardware?

Novell Open Audio: openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: As part of a Novell Open Audio series on openSUSE, they will be interviewing various openSUSE developers to find out more about the project, particular involvements and new technologies in the distribution.

Also: OpenSUSE beats Ubuntu to the punch
And: Novell targets Ubuntu, Fedora with OpenSuse 10.3

PC-BSD Day 30: The verdict

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Thirty days with PC-BSD. One month that flew by. In this month I tried to work with PC-BSD every day, sometimes from a more novice viewpoint, sometimes by pushing the limits from the perspective of the more daring user. But, overall, I did what I would normally do on a Linux desktop or at work on a Windows desktop, which -for me- indicates I can make a decent judgment about PC-BSD as a day to day desktop.

Ubuntu - a Speedup guide

Filed under
HowTos

my10sen.com: Ubuntu has been main player in Linux distro for a couple of years, and yet some might found it to be a little bit slow in a few aspects. Here i try to show some of guides that might give a boost to your Ubuntu systems. These tweaks will make your system faster and more responsive.

Is CentOS 5.0 Worth Every Penny?

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: CentOS is a Linux distribution based on the ever reliable Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). The name stands for Community ENTerprise Operating System and is not related to a coin. The main purpose of CentOS is rebuilding the commercial RHEL and makes it available to those who want the reliability of an enterprise class operating system minus the cost.

Skype 1.4 for Linux out of beta with new features

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Skype 1.4 for Linux is officially out of Beta, and is available for download. The two big WNITVs (What’s New In This Version) are call forwarding, and a “Birthday Alert” service that notifies you when anyone in your Contact list has a birthday.

Top 40 Linux blogs

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxworld: Doc Searls makes some good points about blog ranking. It's so bogus, but it's so much fun people can't stop doing it. So here is the Official Linux Blog Top 40 List, divided into A, B, C, and D lists for your status-seeking convenience.

Mozilla Corp, ARM Inc. and Others to Build a New Device

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

softpedia: Mozilla Corp., Arm Ltd, MontaVista Software Inc. and four other companies are trying to extend the market for a new category of devices, a combination between a smartphone and a laptop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Software Freedom Day

  • Kopete for KDE 4.0; Skype 1.4.0 final released
  • Low disk space
  • Linux group calls Microsoft's bluff
  • The Four Freedoms Applied to Software as a Service
  • ODF and OOXML: Something New to Ponder
  • A TortoiseSVN replacement for Ubuntu
  • NFS Client Updates for 2.6.24
  • If I needed one more reason to dismiss Debian...
  • Open Source for Business: Now More Than Ever, Part 1
  • David Pogue on the OLPC
  • NetworkManager 0.7 feature list
  • Will open source desktops succumb to bloat?
  • MyFive: Making Firefox Better
  • Optimized pow() approximation for Java and C / C++

Could PCLinuxOS 2007 Spell Death for Windows on the Desktop?

Filed under
PCLOS

Linux Today: I have been using Linux for about 12 years now and a few weeks ago I discovered PCLinuxOS 2007. Being so impressed with this new, fast, and super easy to use Linux distribution, has made me not only an advocate but an evangelist.

System and enviromental variables

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: System and enviromental variables define parts of the system behavior so it’s worth knowing what they are, what they influence and how to adjust them to your needs. This is the last part of the “console basics” series.

Ubuntu chief bids for prima-donna status

Filed under
Ubuntu

the register (open season): I'd like to live in a tub of cream cheese icing. Sadly, that's not an option for me. It is, however, an option for Canonical/Ubuntu head Mark Shuttleworth. The open source advocate has plenty of cash - enough cash to build a breathing apparatus and waste removal system for a man-sized icing pool.

Your First Computer

more openSUSE and Novell headlines

Filed under
SUSE
  • ReviewLinux.Com: First Look openSUSE 10.3 i386 DVD

  • Novell boosts desktop Linux
  • Novell Gives openSUSE the (Faster) Boot
  • New Feature List for OpenSUSE 10.3
  • Stay Away from OpenSUSE 10.3
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 Launch Party Locations
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3 Review
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 opens for business
  • And Novell Fires the First Shot

a few statistics:

Filed under
News
  • Swedish police saves 400 cars by using MySQL

  • Hardware4linux : more than 1500 systems reported and ranked
  • LATU Uruguay Buying 100,000 OLPC XO's Over Classmate PC!!

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • check weather conditions and forecasts on the command line

  • How to automatically sign in to Ubuntu
  • Using a MySQL Performance Tuning Analyzer Script
  • What package is that file in ?
  • Handy script protects Linux against traffic spikes
  • Use ssh on multiple servers at one time
  • Installing Audacity MP3 export support on Linux
  • Adjust the Transparency of Window Decorations with Compiz
  • Digitizing records and tapes with Audacity
  • Compiz-Fusion On Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbin”
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more