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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Pidgin IM vs MSN Messenger

Filed under
Software

blog.linuxoss: I am talking about the latest instant messaging client from the Gaim series, called Pidgin, which came after a long period of waiting and broke the download tops. Pidgin can now run on platforms such as Windows, Solaris, SkyOS and Qtopia, beside FreeBSD and Linux of course. Here’s a short list of good reasons to replace your MSN Messenger or Live Messenger with Pidgin:

The use of Linux and open source in pre-schools

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What started as wondering how to contribute to my 5 year old son’s pre-school lead to the discovery of some absolutely terrific open source software that really aids the educational process. Here’s why even in this Microsoft world Linux is the best platform for early childhood education.

State of the LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: Linux is beginning to find its legs as the foundation in many different technologies and in the process is fueling a feedback loop that is helping accelerate the operating system's popularity. The evidence of the cooperation will be on display at next week's LinuxWorld conference in San Francisco.

Puppy's Leader Retirement pre-announcement

Filed under
Linux

puppylinux.com/blog: One of them is that I would like to move to developing an application, in particular I am interested in porting my EVE vector editor to Linux, running with one of the native GUI libraries such as GTK. Also, I would like to do other things.

How Dell and System76’s Ubuntu Machines Stack Up to Their Mac Counterparts

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

dawningvalley.com: Open source operating systems obviously give more bang for the buck than any other operating system in the world. After all, they’re free, and you can’t get lower than free (unless you’re Kaspersky). However, what about pre-installed Ubuntu machines? Do they beat their Windows and OS X competitors in the bang for the buck category?

Don't Like Mono? Try Vala.

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu: My recent post about Mono was sincere, and Boycott Novell has the story about Debian wrong, but Gnome actually is pushing an alternative. Vala is a new language developed by Gnome specifically for developing Gnome apps. It has a syntax very similar to Java or C# (closer to C# from what I've read) and a precompiler which maps the Vala to C source and header files

KDE 4.1 Live CD

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: I just bought a new laptop and KDE guys decide to pamper me by releasing the greatest desktop manager in form of KDE 4.1. To add cherry to the cake OpenSUSE guys made a Live CD and gave me the opportunity to fiddle with it.

Ace in the hole

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

chinwong.com: IT’S difficult to write about the Aspire One from Acer without gushing. Out of the box, this mini-notebook is the perfect traveling companion for anyone who simply needs to surf the Web, send e-mail and perform typical office tasks such as typing up documents, working on spreadsheets or giving a presentation.

Visualizing Open Source Development

Filed under
Software

technocrat.net: An open source project called Code_Swarm has come up with an animated process video outlining the various ways open source projects get started and are refined.

7 Uses of GParted Live

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: I’ve been using GNU Parted to slice and dice my disk in preference to the fdisk for almost as long as I’ve been using Linux. We all fill up our hard-drives from time to time, but thanks to Gnome GParted, rearranging disk partitions isn’t as terrifying as it used to be.

The Chicken Crossing The Road

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: NT Chicken: Will cross the road in June. No, August. September for sure. OS/2 Chicken: It crossed the road in style years ago, but it was so quiet that nobody noticed.

GNOME Layout

Filed under
Software

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I’ve often wondered why more of the popular Linux distro’s don’t adopt what most new user’s to Linux would feel as “normal” as a default layout. I wonder how many “newbie” Linux users HATE the two panels taking up screen-space, yet have no clue that it can be consolidated into one.

Why is there no real FOSS social network?

Filed under
Software

seanrtilley.blogspot: I have had a thought. Upon looking upon a identi.ca today, I had a thought. While we have a VERY nice alternative to Twitter, what about a full-on alternative to Myspace?

The revenge of the Linux munchkins

Filed under
Linux

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: We have known about the Microsoft muchkins all our lives. Those are people who are paid to scan the Internet for unfavorable articles and use the comment facilities to do what Microsoft does best: spread FUD. As far as I know there is no such equivalent in the Linux world. It just seems like that.

more odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Bug your distro to package OpenJPEG

  • Google bans the Mozilla Public License
  • How to convert an img file to an iso
  • Gentoo Install Notes for a Fujitsu LifeBook A6110
  • Leaking information about Boston Summit 2008

KDE 4.1 Mania (Overview on Kubuntu, Fedora and Opensuse)

Filed under
KDE

linux-guider.blogspot: KDE 4 is the current series of releases of the K Desktop Environment. The first version (4.0.0) of this series was released on 11 January 2008. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008. KDE 4.1 includes a shared emoticon theming system which is used in PIM and Kopete, and DXS.

KDE 4.1: Good, bad, or beautiful?

Filed under
KDE

celettu.wordpress: The last week, I’ve been struggling with KDE 4.1. I really want to like it. Actually, I do like it. It’s stable, it’s fast, and it’s gorgeous. I love the Oxygen look, the plasmoids, the KWin desktop effects…it all looks great.

gDesklets - Desklets for your Desktop in openSUSE

Filed under
Software
HowTos

susegeek.com: gDesklets is another great tool like Google Gadgets for bringing mini programs called desklets such as weather forecasts, news tickers, system information displays, or music player controls, onto your desktop, where they are sitting there in a symbiotic relationship of eye candy and usefulness.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Managing packages using apt on Ubuntu

  • Enable NumLock in KDE 4.1
  • Getting Ruby Plasmoids up and running in KDE 4.1 (on Kubuntu)
  • NIC bonding with Ubuntu

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • A Quick Look at Xubuntu Xtreme

  • Linux Mint one year later
  • GNU/Linux
  • My Week in Ubuntu: KDE 4.1
  • Sabayon 3.5
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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.

today's howtos