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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Comparison of Python virtual machines

  • What to do if every kernel update break your bootloader settings
  • auto-apt : on-demand package installer
  • 3 More Things Every Good Linux Adminstrator Knows
  • Automatically mount encrypted filesystems at login with pam_mount
  • Tables in OpenOffice.org Impress: New and Unstylish
  • Why Firefox Rocks on Linux: Great Firefox Tricks, Part III
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux
  • More Quick Ways To Find CPU Bottlenecks On Linux

Amarok Insider - Issue 13 Released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: Issue 13 of Amarok Insider, the official Amarok newsletter is out. It discusses the evolution of Amarok's interface, reveals the release plans, covers some of the biggest features of the upcoming version 2.0, and much more. Download links for Windows and OS X versions of the Amarok 2.0 beta are included.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

Filed under
Fluxbox

fosswire.com: When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Wi-Fi Linux network bug found, fixed

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: These days, most of us can use our Wi-Fi cards on Linux using native drivers. Some of us, though, are still stuck with using Windows drivers on Linux. This kludge is usually done by using the Windows driver with NDISwrapper. Unfortunately, it's recently been discovered that there's a crack in the kludge.

IBM Lotus Adds Mac OS X, Ubuntu Linux Support To Symphony Apps

Filed under
Software

crn.com: Expanding its efforts to offer an alternative to Microsoft's Office desktop applications, IBM is making its free Lotus Symphony office productivity suite available for Apple's Mac OS X and Canonical's Ubuntu Linux.

Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

Filed under
OSS

phoronix.com: The Sound Blaster X-Fi sound card driver for Linux from Creative Labs was awful. That's simply the nicest way to put it. However, Creative Labs today has finally turned this situation around and they have open-sourced the code to this notorious driver.

Collabora funds development of open source video editor PiTiVi

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Open source multimedia specialist Collabora is hiring developers to work on the nonlinear video editor PiTiVi. The Cambridge, UK-based company contributes heavily to the GStreamer media framework and other GStreamer-dependent projects, so PiTiVi is a natural fit -- and it fills a sorely needed niche on the Linux desktop.

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

Filed under
SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

More Work On Red Hat's Wayland Project

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Since publishing the world's first look at Wayland, a nano display server for Linux with an integrated compositing manager, there has been much interest in this emerging Red Hat project. While this project is still in its infancy, below are a few more notes about recent changes with Wayland.

Will Linux ever be a mainstream desktop play?

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: I strongly suspect that there are inherent tradeoffs between the flexibility and choice associated with open source and the unified approach (epitomized by Apple) that tends to be associated with good user interface design. But the bigger issue with mainstreaming the Linux PC has nothing to do with design and everything with where we are in technology history.

No More Doom And Gloom, Please

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: It seems that more and more bloggers are writing doom and gloom articles or attention grabbing headlines to that effect. Recently one blogger has taken it upon himself to write about the virtues of Windows 7 and make pronouncements that it will kill Linux on netbooks and “instant on” computers. Others write that the success of Ubuntu will kill other distros and poses a threat to Linux as a whole. I say, enough already.

Why Linux sucks at being user friendly

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Forget the OS wars, Apple and Microsoft do not need to wield any weapons today. Linux seems to be doing a good enough job of shooting itself in the foot when it comes to appealing to your average PC user.

Mac OS X 10.5 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we published Ubuntu 7.04 to 8.10 benchmarks from a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 and had found Ubuntu's performance degraded peculiarly over the past year and a half. This time around we're switching out the hardware we're testing on to Intel's newer Core 2 series and we're comparing the performance of the x86 and x86_64 editions of Ubuntu 8.10 against Apple's Mac OS X 10.5.5.

The Future of Gnome

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Neil Patel of Canonical recently posted an outline of the new user interface concepts that Gnome developers envisioned during the “Gnome User Experience” conference in Boston a couple of weeks ago. But are the concepts a good move?

What Linux Needs to Stay Competitive

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: For some time, Windows Vista’s perceived failure has given Linux a free ride. It has been nice, but it will not remain. From the looks of things, Windows 7 will be a solid release. With this competition, what does Linux need to stay competitive?

Five Tweaks for Your New Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: With the recent release of the popular Linux distro Ubuntu's 8.10 version, code-named Intrepid Ibex, we've recently detailed some productive-minded Ubuntu Kung Fu, as well as a user-minded tour through 8.10. This morning, though, we're taking a more nuts-and-bolts look at changes you can make to your newly-installed system to make it faster, reliable, and more enjoyable.

The new openSUSE community-elected board speaks

Filed under
SUSE

linux.com: The openSUSE project has a new board, and the new board has big plans. The distribution's first board was appointed by Novell in November 2007, tasked with the unusual job of "bootstrapping" a community-elected board that could guide the project with a balance of Novell and non-Novell influence.

Using IPv6 On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how you can configure a Debian Etch system for IPv6 so that a) it can connect to other IPv6 hosts and Cool other IPv6 hosts can connect to it. IPv6 should become more important in the future as recent estimates assume that there will be no more IPv4 addresses left by 2010 or 2011.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Open source as a strategic competitive weapon

  • How Can I Sync My Firefox Installations?
  • Creating a user-centric site in Drupal
  • KDEGames review day invitation
  • ApacheCon keynotes streamed for free
  • Why Use Linux?
  • Top 3 Mozilla Firefox 4 Features For Next Generation Browsing Experience
  • Tree now closed for Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 “slushy freeze”
  • Open Source is /screwed/
  • OASIS Forms Committee to Advance ODF Applications
  • Open source valuations remain birdseed
  • Metro 1.1 Custom Builds
  • Red Hat Puts On Fedora #10
  • Free Linux Sticker Book For Your Laptop/Desktop
  • Microsoft haters, Mac daddies, and Linux Lovers
  • Delivery problems with Pandora Game Console
  • Bash: Preserving Whitespace Using set and eval
  • Linux boom?
  • Smart updated with more urpmi functionality implemented
  • The Fall of the Gentoo Wiki
  • Remastersys - Create custom Ubuntu (live) CD
  • Linus on his healthy lifestyle

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Hangs on Initial Test Run

  • Latest ubuntu failure: wifi
  • Intrepid Ibex lays claim to the Black Tower
  • Ubuntu Linux’s 8 Million Users
  • How to Disable The PC (internal/system) Speaker in Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more

Fedora and Red Hat's Finances

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.