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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 4 keys to success for LibreOffice as a service Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 12:55pm
Story Bazel: Google Build Tool is now Open Source Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 12:50pm
Story Ubuntu Kylin 15.04 Beta 2 Is Now Available for Download - Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 12:45pm
Story Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 2 Released with KDE Plasma 5 as Default Desktop - Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 11:57am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 11:41am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 11:39am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 11:38am
Story Embedded Linux Keeps on Growing, IoT Next Big Win Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 11:29am
Story Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge Review: All Hail the New Android Smartphone Kings Rianne Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 9:53am
Story A Dell 4K laptop with Linux: Tough construction and built for developers. Roy Schestowitz 27/03/2015 - 8:29am

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 294

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: Installing Linux with Logical Volume Management

  • News: Slackware switches to KDE 4, Ubuntu packages Plymouth, openSUSE resurrects broken download server, Debian overviews 'Squeeze', Tiny Core reveals 10 MB desktop distro, best window managers of 2000
  • Released last week: PCLinuxOS 2009.1, Tiny Core Linux 1.2
  • Upcoming releases: OpenBSD 4.5 pre-orders, Frugalware Linux 1.0
  • New additions: moonOS
  • New distributions: ARAnyM/AFROS Live CD, FuguIta, Jarro Negro Linux, Livre S.O.
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Change is a hard thing to do

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: Changing from closed source programs to open source programs is a hard thing to do. Many people will resist that change fiercely and will pull every trick out of the book to justify their objections to that change.

hands-on with the Kogan Agora Netbook Pro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.idg.com.au: Look out Australia, there's a new netbook about to hit town and it's by Kogan. It's a 10.2in netbook that will cost $539. For the price you'll get 2GB of RAM and a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU. Kogan has chosen to release the Agora Netbook Pro with gOS.

Don’t fear the fsync!

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: After reading the comments on my earlier post, Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem, it’s become very clear to me that there are a lot of myths and misplaced concerns about fsync() and how best to use it.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • HOWTO: compile mplayer with VDPAU under Ubuntu (x86 or x86_64)

  • Ubuntu 9.04 ported to Nokia's N8x0 Internet Tablets
  • Indian opposition party backs open source software
  • Fear and loathing in Holland
  • More Unix/Linux Cartoons
  • How Successfully Dual-Boot Hackintosh and Ubuntu Linux
  • Economic plight boosts Linux adoption
  • Final Round Of Linux/Unix Cartoons
  • Dealing with SSH’s key spam problem
  • Install/Set-up Conky on Ubuntu
  • GParted eats my day…
  • Tutorial : Easily save any online video in Linux
  • Linux gains social networking hub
  • Linux Void 23 - No Gregor It’s Not Pi Day Yet
  • Elisa - A Great Open Media Center

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #133

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #133 for the week of March 8th- March 14th, 2009 is now available.

Selling open source to the powers-that-be

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The idea of thinking up a hypothetical situation and then asking a group of qualified panellists to visualise how each would react to it is nothing new.

The Linux Stimulus Package

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: Is there a stimulus package on the way for those who use Linux and Open Source Software? You bet there is but it might not come from where you'd expect.

How the Linux kernel works

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: The kernel is a piece of software that, roughly speaking, provides a layer between the hardware and the application programs running on a computer. In a strict, computer-science sense, the term 'Linux' refers only to the kernel - the bit that Linus Torvalds wrote in the early 90s.

Linux Review 11: Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-exploration.blogspot: After 11 successful looks at Linux, I think I may have found my favorite... Arch Linux.

Red Hat Offensive Patent Strategy

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently Red Hat has decided to go on the offensive with their patent strategy. With this patent Red Hat is attempting to patent “Method and apparatus to deliver messages between applications”.

The seven best Linux Foundation contest videos

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Linux doesn't have much in the way of advertising. Now, the Linux Foundation is trying to change that with it's "We're Linux" Video Contest. So, here are my seven favorite picks in the contest.

10 reasons why KDE is better than GNOME

Filed under
KDE

blog.hyperfish.org: Having Read this wonderful article over at techrepublic by Jack Wallen called “10 reasons why GNOME is better than KDE“. I think a retort is in order form the KDE side?

Is Debian listening to its users?

Filed under
Linux

blog.stone-head.org: For some time ago I’ve been pondering about this question. As long as GSoC 2009 is about to start and people are looking for project ideas, I’m posting here a very preliminar draft of my findings and an idea for a posible software project.

Some personal thoughts about Ubuntu and Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

cutebuntu.moonthology.org: Not so surprisingly I’m ex-Windows-user who recently (little less than year ago) switched to Linux, Ubuntu more precisely.

Five Best Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

lifehacker.com: There are many, many Linux distributions, and a lot of unique reasons to like them. Read on to see which open-source operating systems inspired our readers to provide our biggest Hive Five response to date.

Popularity VS Usability

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: We see blog posts and articles everywhere. They proclaim that Distro X has the most users. Distro B has the most hits on a site that lists distros. Distro C is the top because Linus or some other "Geek God" prefers it.

Ubuntu: Understanding The Media Codec Problems

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: My problem is how he is lumping MP3 encoding and decoding into the closed-source pile and this is something that frustrates me terribly.

Qimo does it right

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I finally gave Qimo a turn a day or two ago. Nicely done, and that’s really all that can be said.

Essential Linux tools for the PC technician

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Recently, I blogged that every good IT technician really needs Linux in their toolkit – even if you're strictly a Windows shop. Here are more good reasons why a bootable Linux CD can really save your bacon including indispensable tools you must have.

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Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.

today's leftovers

  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave
    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11
    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?
  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux
    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.
  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1
    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages. I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.
  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29
    Can you spot what that is?
  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4
    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack. Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.
  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?
    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform. At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap. Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.
  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing
    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update. To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.
  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding
    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.
  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation
    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.
  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network
    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.
  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday

today's howtos

Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More