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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 3 Ways to Play Windows Games on Linux srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:55pm
Story Adobe: 64-bit Flash Player Later This Year srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:53pm
Story List of the top 10 Linux lists srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:51pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.0 (Part 1) - Networking srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:30pm
Story Fedora 16 To Use Btrfs By Default srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:00pm
Story Understatement of the Year by Linus Torvalds srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 3:59pm
Story Desktop Summit Keynote Interview: Thomas Thwaite srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:53pm
Story Firefox Full Screen srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:51pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:21am
Story Two new projects can help free software replace Skype srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 5:20am

The Myths of DST

Filed under
Linux

I would be lying if I said I was a big fan of Daylight Savings Time (DST). If you are in IT, you are patching all your time critical systems right now. This intersects Linux of course because Linux is affected by this rampaging ... err... change.. One of my senior technical people internally wiki'ed this handy document about the Myths of DST:

Microsoft and Novell. Strange bedfellows?

Filed under
SUSE

I know that this makes me sound like a graybeard but I can remember when Novell was a bigger name than Microsoft. They weren't exactly competitors then but they weren't friends either. As Microsoft grew larger so Novell became a pale shadow of its former self. Then when Microsoft unveiled its New Technology operating system for servers and the business world it became a direct competitor to Novell. By that time Novell just didn't have the exposure and market share to effectively compete. It became a niche player in an ever shrinking niche.

Amarok 1.4.5 and AWN Issue 6 Released

Filed under
Software

The long-awaited Amarok 1.4.5 has finally been released. Major changes include an integrated Shoutcast stream directory, the new Magnatune music store re-download manager, support for track labeling, and improved sound quality when using the equalizer with xine engine. Many of the new features are explained in the latest issue of the Amarok Weekly Newsletter.

Best of Both: Windows and Ubuntu on a Single PC

Filed under
OS

“Linux rocks!” “no, it’s lame—stick with Windows!” Visit any Web site or online forum where impassioned computer users debate the relative merits of operating systems, and you’ll find endless disagreement. The only way to determine which operating system fits your needs is to run both on the same PC, configured for dual-booting.

Novell: 'No One Can Stop Us From Selling Linux'

Filed under
SUSE

The company comes out swinging after the Free Software Foundation expresses concerns over the Novell/Microsoft partnership. "We're telling customers that no one can stop us from selling SUSE Linux," the spokesman said.

Understanding the Free Software Foundation

Filed under
OSS

Free Software Foundation, or FSF for short, is one of the most controversial information technology related organizations. Some people hate it and some people love it. Neither can change the fact that it has had a tremendous influence on what many today tend to call the "open source" phenomenon which is in fact lying on the very foundations that the FSF represents; Free Software and the Free Software philosophy.

Five ways to use Windows apps in Linux

Filed under
Software

When someone asks me if they can run "Windows Application X" on Linux, the first thing I tell them is to look for an open source alternative. For most Windows applications, there will be a high-quality open source alternative that can meet their needs. The biggest hurdle for non-Linux people is simply knowing that these alternative exist and how to find them.

Book review: The Starfish and the Spider

Filed under
Reviews

Intelligent people can and should disagree. So when we read The Starfish and the Spider, it’s no surprise that we had varied opinions. And when it was time to publish a review, no one could quite agree on which review we should publish. In the spirit of intelligent discourse, here are two reviews of the same book.

Interview with David Korn

Filed under
Interviews

David Korn received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from RPI in 1965 and his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in 1969. After working on computer simulations of transsonic air foils, he switched fields to computer science and became a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories in 1976. He is the creator of the KornShell, a command language for the UNIX environment, as well as UWIN, an X-Open library for Windows NT and Windows 95. In 1984, he was inducted as a Bell Labs fellow. He currently works for AT&T Research in Florham Park, NJ and graciously agreed to take a few moments and answer a few questions for our readers.

Gentlemen, start your engines!

Filed under
Gaming

Those of you that are fans of car racing will probably recognize this post's title as the famous phrase that gives the official start to the Indianapolis 500. If it happens that you are a fan of both car racing and free software, you may well be interested in TORCS (The Open Racing Cars Simulator).

Get Involved! Second openSUSE community meeting 2007-02-11

Filed under
SUSE

This is the second ever community meeting taking place, and it is run by
openSUSE Community members who are not employed by Novell/SUSE.

Foresight Is a Linux Distro to Watch

Filed under
Linux

It seems as if a new Linux-based operating system is born every day, with each facing the challenge of justifying its existence in a field that's already rather crowded with mature Linux distributions boasting active user bases and organized bodies to back them. But one relatively young Linux distribution worth keeping an eye on is Foresight Linux.

Free/Open Source Software recommended for use in developing countries

Filed under
OSS

Over 130 IT professionals of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from more than 27 countries had gathered at Sukabumi, Indonesia for a nine-day Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) training camp called "ASIA SOURCE II." The key objective was to promote the use of FOSS for social and economic development and to build a network of FOSS practitioners and trainers with Asia.

An approach to parental control for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Every day more and more parents face the need to make the decision on whether allow their children to access the internet and its extensive resources to raise better informed and connected persons or surrender to equally extensive and invasive contents that just don’t fit their parenting ways and keep them away of a computer.

Is Novell losing Linux? No, it's just bad reporting

Filed under
OS

Commentary: Blame Jim Finkle at Reuters, I suppose. His story is the one that started this large dung-ball of misinformation rolling around the Internet. You know the one, about Novell losing the right to distribute Linux.

The hunt for a Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

Where can the average South African consumer get their hands on a new PC loaded with Linux instead of Windows? Not a lot of places, as it turns out.

One man can end the Microsoft-Linux feud

Filed under
OS

Bill Gates. And I think he will. I don't think it's a coincidence, or a mere marketing choice, that caused Gates to pop up as the public face of the Windows Vista launch last week, after publicly retiring six months earlier.

Preview of Beryl 0.2.0

Filed under
Software

Beryl is simply creating some of the most exciting and innovative work on any computing platform. Amazingly, Beryl came into existence only 6 months or so ago. The Beryl project orginally forked from the Compiz 3d desktop group around September of 2006. At the time I had a hard time understanding why we needed another 3d desktop project, but now that I have had a chance to watch Beryl develop, their decision makes a whole lot of sense.

Is E-Commerce Ready for Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Thirty-seven percent of North American enterprises that sell products or services online will purchase a new e-commerce platform, according to Forrester Research. The options available to them include a considerable amount of open source applications. However, while open source is clearly making an impact in the e-commerce space, it is not yet fully integrated.

Free Software Magazine Issue 16

Filed under
OSS

Highlights:

  • Paper is dead - has PDF followed suit?
  • Freeing an old game
  • The free Tron Universe—Armagetron
  • The lazy user’s guide to OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Vega Strike
  • Configuring a Linux home internet gateway
  • A media center based on GNU/Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

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Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more