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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Is the Cloud Stupid?

redmonk.com: Count me among those less than intelligent by Stallman’s reckoning individuals that considers cloud computing inevitable. I’ll go further and argue that’s it’s not inevitable, it’s done. Already.

Kernel Log: 2.6.27 nearing completion; Btrfs to be added to the kernel?

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Linus Torvalds hinted that the eighth release candidate (RC) of Linux 2.6.27, would be the last RC prior to release of the next major kernel. Usually, once such a hint is dropped, it takes one to two weeks for the next version to be released.

Review: SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 2

Filed under
Linux

headshotgamer.com: SimplyMEPIS was, believe it or not, my main distribution back in 2005 and used it with minimal complaints for a number of years. Then I moved away from Mepis and never returned - until now (/dramatic music).

OLPC / Amazon preparing to bring G1G1 to Europe?

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: There were 4 big questions when it was first revealed that Amazon would be running this year's edition of the Give 1 Get 1 program. 3 out of these 4 questions have been answered so what about the last one? Well, for the first time there are some indications that OLPC and Amazon are preparing to bring G1G1 v2 to Canada and Europe.

Rule #1: Hold On Loosely

Filed under
Legal

In the proprietary production world, what matters about a copyright is who owns it. In the free production world, however, who owns a copyright is relatively unimportant. What matters is what license it is offered under. There is a very simple rule of thumb about the best license to use: use a “free, copyleft license”.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Server: Canonical's Third Way to the Enterprise

  • Office 2007 docx to ODF Conversion
  • Video tour: Bluefish editor
  • Chávez chavs get Linux Classmates
  • Mandriva 2009 RC2 KDE4
  • ClickJacking! Nooooooooo!
  • Setting up your own certificate authority with gnoMint
  • Make Linux: Harder - Better - Faster
  • Ubuntu: Not A Small Business Server Replacement (Yet)
  • Running git-daemon under an unprivileged user
  • libZYpp, torrents and metalinks
  • The Conundrum of Choices and the Linux Learning Curve
  • Go Forward The Message
  • Pandora pre-orders go live
  • about:mozilla - Mobile Firefox, Weave, Data, Logos, FAQs and more…
  • “Linux Ahead” - - a new video podcast show on FOSS news
  • Critical hole in Mplayer
  • Open Source Census Tracks Enterprise Use of Open Source Globally

Open Source Census Finds FOSS Everywhere

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: The Open Source Census, which I mentioned back in April, just dropped a press release this morning about the data it's been collecting. I chatted the day before with Kim Weins, senior VP of OpenLogic, a key co-sponsor of the census, and how they found a few ... surprises in the results.

Five programs you can afford in a financial meltdown

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: No matter what happens to the bailout, it's a safe bet that times are going to be hard. So what can you do? The choice is clear: switch to open-source software. Like what you ask?

2001: A search odyssey

Filed under
Google

googleblog.blogspot: Now that we're a decade old, we figured we're long overdue for some spring cleaning. We started digging around our basement and found all kinds of junk: old Swedish fish, pigeon poop, Klingon translation books. Amazingly enough, hidden in a corner beneath Larry's and Sergey's original lab coats, we found a vintage search index in mint condition. We dusted it off and took it for a spin, gobsmacked to see how different the web was in early 2001.

Audio Rippers and Encoders in Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

computingtech.blogspot: The application you use to rip audio files from CD and encode them into space-saving MP3 or Ogg Vorbis formats is commonly referred to as a ripper.

Four Easy Fun Useful Things You Can Do With Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Today you get a hearty serving of some of my favorite tips and tricks, painstakingly accumulated and carefully squirreled away for a special occasion. Autumn is here, which is always special, so here they are.

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 30 September 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

The September issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter has been released. In this month's issue: EAPI-2 approved, Gentoo-Quebec training, learn to use iotop, and more!

Keep tabs on your finances with HomeBank

Filed under
Software

linux.com: "Where does all my money go?" If you want to know the exact answer to that question, you need HomeBank, a personal finance manager that can help you keep track of your income and expenses with consummate ease.

Nokia renames Trolltech and Qtopia

Filed under
Software

news.zdnet.co.uk: Trolltech, the software-development company bought earlier this year by Nokia, has been renamed 'Qt Software', after its main product Qt.

2.6.27-rc8, "This One Should Be The Last One"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "So yet another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.27-rc8 Linux kernel. He continued, "this one should be the last one: we're certainly not running out of regressions."

Financial Crisis Offers Opportunity for Linux, Open Source

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundations says technologies like Linux and open source software can help enterprises cut costs during tough economic times. Zemlin says users should look to open source and Linux, systems management tools, and virtualization technology to keep budgets in line.

x2x is a software alternative to a KVM switch

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Unless you have fully embraced the virtualization movement, you probably have more than one machine in your home or office, particularly if you run more than one operating system, and you probably have more than one keyboard and mouse on you desk. If you would like to regain some desk space without having to purchase a KVM switch, x2x may be the solution.

Fedora 10 Beta release announcement

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: Just on the heels of the Fedora Project's fifth anniversary, the Beta of Fedora Linux version 10 (code-named Cambridge) is now available:

Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid's Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Ubuntu users were promised a radical new desktop theme with Ubuntu 8.04 and then that ended up getting postponed to the upcoming 8.10 release (a.k.a. the Intrepid Ibex).

Zen and the Art of the Six-Figure Linux Job

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: You’ve heard the stereotypes and the misconceptions. Since Linux is free software, the developers who create it are paid next to nothing, right? Wrong.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, K

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.