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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Perfect Tree For Linux Released srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 12:12pm
Story 2011: The year open source goes (really) capitalist srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 12:09pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 6:08am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 5:57am
Story Sabayon Christmas Gaming Edition is Here srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 2:35am
Story The Board 0.1.0 srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 2:33am
Story Revenge of the Titans will go open-source at 1.75M srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 2:32am
Story A Xonotic Preview Release Comes For Christmas srlinuxx 24/12/2010 - 2:30am
Story The 10 Coolest Open Source Applications Of 2010 srlinuxx 23/12/2010 - 11:17pm
Story Lesser known features in the latest Ubuntu Software Center srlinuxx 23/12/2010 - 11:16pm

aKademy 2006 Kicked Off

Filed under
KDE

aKademy 2006 has been kicked off at the Trinity College in Dublin. The first two days consist of the contributors conference with a fully packed programme of presentations on aspects such as the community, KDE 4, cross-desktop collaboration and KDE & the Free Desktop in Asian countries.

Myah OS v2.2 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Myah OS: ever hear of it? Neither did we till we decided to give it a shot with its recent 2.2 release. Myah OS is built on GNU/Linux with the KDE desktop environment but they have extensively tweaked the user interface and have made it a relatively visually pleasing desktop -- except for the fact that it looks very similar to Windows XP in many respects. Myah OS 2.2 is based upon Slackware 11, Linux 2.6.17.8 kernel, and includes many proprietary packages such as ATI/NVIDIA and Sun's Java.

Those Screenshots.

Linux for mere mortals

Filed under
Linux

You don't have to be a technician to intsall the latest version of the alternative operating system, writes Rob Pegoraro. The Linux operating system - a free, open-source alternative to Windows and Mac OS X - has long served to define the gap between people who merely use computers and those who tinker with them.

The Lniux Boot Process Explained

Filed under
HowTos

The beginning of the boot process varies depending on the hardware platform being used. However, once the kernel is found and loaded by the boot loader, the default boot process is identical across all architectures.

Stallman gets it right on patents

Filed under
OSS

The way of the Free Software Foundation is to insist on purity. The way of open source is to seek compromises. Once again these two camps have come up against each other - and the issue this time is patents. Last year, the Open Source Development Lab, which refers to itself grandiosely as the "centre of gravity of Linux", set in motion a project called Open Source as Prior Art; the project's aim is to "see fewer poor quality patents."

Is Debian dying?

Filed under
Linux

For a while, Debian was the community Linux darling. In its heyday, Debian was known for its strong moral point of view and its outstanding code. Numerous important distributions, such as Linspire, Knoppix, and today's most popular distribution, Ubuntu, have sprung from it. Things have changed.

Rediscovering Bluetooth

Filed under
Software

Presenting Bluetooth in 2006 is hard. By all accounts, it should have emerged much sooner to be omnipresent by now. Yet it did not succeed as planned and therefore carries a bad reputation. Bluetooth is popular, but not as popular as WiFi. However, you can do a lot more with Bluetooth, especially with casual hacking.

A Matter of Trust

Filed under
Misc

If someone betrays your trust, it can be a very hard road to travel to earn that trust back. The most recent example of a loss of trust in the IT industry has been the recent alleged actions conducted by members of the HP board of directors. When I read this September 18 vnunet.com headline: "Open Source Community Welcomes Microsoft Patent Pledge." Here was, in complete form, my initial thought: We do?

OpenOffice plug-in plan set for debut

Filed under
OOo

Following in Firefox's footsteps, the next version of OpenOffice.org will support plug-in extensions to attract developers to the open-source productivity suite.

Linux developers sign a petition rejecting the current draft of GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Nothing has created furore more than the GPL version 3 which is still in the draft stage. The Free Software Foundation's move to create a separate version of GPL taking corrective measures to guard against DRM has not been well received by the core group of Linux developers which includes Linus Torvalds.

NVIDIA 1.0-9625 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

Two days after delivering our NVIDIA 1.0-9XXX Series Preview, NVIDIA has shocked the alternative OS community by not only delivering a Beta candidate for the Linux display drivers but also for Solaris and FreeBSD! While our preview featured many of the same changes found in this release, today at Phoronix we have all of the details on this 1.0-9625 Beta.

Alan Cox's ThinkPad battery explodes

Filed under
Misc

It appears that the exploding IBM ThinkPad that we spotted last week at LAX may not have been a fluke after all. Telsa Gwynne, wife of famed Linux kernel programmer Alan Cox, describes on her website how her husband's ThinkPad battery suddenly exploded last night.

Linux: Looking At 2.6.19, No Reiser4 yet

Filed under
Linux

Andrew Morton posted his patch queue with numerous comments about merge plans into the mainline kernel. Among his comments he noted that he would not yet be merging the Reiser4 filesystem, "reiser4. I was planning on merging this, but the batch_write/writev problemight wreck things, and I don't think the patches arising from my recent partial review have come through yet. So it's looking more like 2.6.20."

Red Flag Linux may be next on IBM's agenda

Filed under
Linux

The next Linux distribution that IBM throws its weight behind is likely to be China's Red Flag Linux, suggesting that for businesses elsewhere in the world the Linux market will remain a two-horse race for the time being.

32 bits are better than 64

Filed under
SUSE

RECENT TESTS conducted using a Small Business Transaction Benchmark from Neal Nelson showed that a 32-bit version of Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10 provided up to 37 percent more throughput than a 64-bit version.

Should Shuttleworth Address United Nations?

Filed under
Misc

Mark Shuttleworth should sell the idea of non-patentable shared "open energy technology" to world leaders as its potential to have a profound impact on the reduction of the greenhouse gases is enormous.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Beta 1: Look but Don't Touch

Filed under
Reviews

The features Red Hat says will be in RHEL 5 sound great, but the promise was hard to prove in tests because of some system flakiness and omissions.

Quick guide to get a girlfriend using Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos
Humor

This guide is pretty straightforward. No introductions, lectures or philosophing about love. Follow it from beginning to end, and you might get a woman today!

Create training videos with pyvnc2swf

Filed under
HowTos

How many times has someone verbally explained how to do something on a computer to you? How many times do you end up asking them to just show you? For these situations there is pyvnc2swf, a program that turns screen input into video files. Let's see just how easy it is to use it to producing training videos.

OpenOffice bundles Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Future versions of OpenOffice.org will come bundled with Mozilla's Thunderbird email client and Lightning calendar application.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.

Devuan Beta, Stumbling Tumbleweed, Ubuntu Too

Today in Linux news Debian-fork Devuan is forging ahead with its plans to create a distribution offering init freedom by releasing a beta for testers. Douglas DeMaio posted today that openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have halted due to glibc upgrade rebuilds. Dedoimedo reviewed the BQ Aquaris M10 and liliputing.com posted of another Ubuntu laptop for sale. And finally, the Hectic Geek reviewed Ubuntu 16.04 and Neil Rickert reviewed Kubuntu 16.04. Read more Also: Devuan releases beta Devuan Jessie - beta release announcement

Devuan Jessie beta released

dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian

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