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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:47am
Story Mozilla Joins Hour of Code Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:29am
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Freshens Up Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:21am
Story Devuan: Unto Us a Fork Is Born Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:13am
Story SparkyLinux 3.6 LXDE, MATE, Razor-Qt & Xfce Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:10am
Story $6 quad core SoC targets low cost 4K set-top boxes Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 3:05am
Story Red Hat product president Paul Cormier disses the Docker myth Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2014 - 2:04am
Story European Commission to update its open source policy Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 11:56pm
Story MX-14.3 Is an OS Based on Debian That Can Bring Old Computers Back to Life Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 11:52pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 to Get GTK+ 3.14 and Updated GNOME Packages Rianne Schestowitz 08/12/2014 - 11:34pm

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 8.10 and OpenOffice.org 3.0

  • Ubuntu Special Characters
  • Why choose Ubuntu 8.10 as a server?
  • Installing Ubuntu 8.10 In 12 Easy Steps
  • Ubuntu from your flash drive - easier than ever before
  • Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • 50 amazing Ubuntu time-saving tips

YaST releases independent of openSUSE releases?

Filed under
Software
SUSE

opensuse.org: YaST is one of the cornerstones of openSUSE. There never was a release of YaST independent of openSUSE. Even the versioning of YaST is tied to openSUSE. But in principle, YaST is a tool that can be used across distributions.

Why Microsoft is running scared of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: Microsoft is frightened. Even Ballmer is telling users that they can skip Vista, which tells you everything you need to know about Vista's failure. In the past, Microsoft wouldn't have sweated this kind of flop. "What can users do?" they'd say. "Move to Linux or Macs? Ha!" That was then. This is now.

Also: Windows 7 Will Let Microsoft Track Your Every Move

The View From Firefox's Bleeding Edge

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The View From Firefox's Bleeding Edge

  • Mozilla Firefox 3.0.4 update coming November 12
  • My Most-Useful Firefox Add-ons
  • Microsoft breaks HotMail for Linux users?

Some kinda Linux mix

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

beranger.org: If there is a distro that supports well my hardware, then it doesn't hibernate, or the provided OpenOffice.org can't load the Antidote RX plugin, or some other software is missing, or it doesn't offer GNOME, or it doesn't provide updates in a timely manner, or its developers are Nazis when comes to a particular subject, or some of the software in the repositories is broken, or the distro is supported for only about 12-13-18 months, etc. etc. Yes, I've installed Ubuntu 8.10...

Can't we all just get a distro?

Filed under
Linux

neowin.net: Its no secret that open source is a viable alternative to pay for systems such as Vista and OSX; but why has it taken until now for laptop manufactures to start shipping Linux as an option?

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Initial Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

dtschmitz.com: Even if I wasn't such an openSUSE devotee, I think I might find a lot of good things to say about this Linux product. Beta 4 is almost stable enough for production use.

Linux growth: The Asus connection

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Asustek is not a name most people know. The Taiwan-based hardware maker traditionally operates in the PC-board sector. But a few years ago the company began to make its own notebook PCs.

Puppy Linux - Absolutely stunning!

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Puppy Linux is an amazing distro. If you're thinking this tiny, 93MB distro is going to leave you with a spartan, minimalistic desktop experience, think again.

Why do old bugs still exist?

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: It's really begun to baffle me why certain bugs within the FOSS world haven't been fixed yet, or have taken so long to be fixed. A couple that come to mind come from recent experiences I've had either directly, or indirectly with these bugs.

How Linux Helped Chickens, Environmentalists, and a Pirate

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: I’ve worked with a Japanese company called Plat’Home, maker of small, tough, eco-friendly servers, for the past nine months or so. They ran a contest this summer about ideas. They called it the “Will Linux Work? Contest.” They collected ideas from Linux lovers on how they would use Linux in interesting and sometimes challenging ways.

Hell freezes over: Ballmer considering open-source browser

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

cnet.com: I fully expected to die never having heard a positive word escape Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's lips with regard to open source. Based on Ballmer's comments made in Sydney on Friday, however, it may be time for me to start picking out my funeral arrangements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Why Microsoft fears Linux

  • What Outsourcers Can Learn from Open-Source Communities
  • Fedora 10 preview release shines like a star
  • Is Sun taking open source a little too far?
  • Open Sources Episode 2: This time we pay attention
  • Follow The Netbook Road
  • Netbook conundrum -- Windows or Linux?
  • Sun still radiating open source
  • Fork you very much: Gist brings revision tracking to pastes
  • Road-Tripping With Linux
  • DRM firmware adopted by mobile Linux stack
  • OIN: Making the world 'safe for Linux'
  • New critical vulnerabilities in VLC media player
  • Debian Linux
  • Decided to stay on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Mandriva Testcases
  • The Case for a New Open Source License
  • Dell Inspiron Mini 9 battery consumption test
  • Kiss Firefox EULA goodbye
  • At ApacheCon, Microsoft jumps on open source bandwagon

10 Cool Linux Apps You Maybe Didn’t Know About

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Ubuntu comes pre-installed with a wealth of apps - covering almost every task you need to do, while still managing to fit on a CD. Are you ready to discover some pretty cool apps that don’t get the attention they deserve? Let’s check them out.

GNU/Linux is user-friendly - and logical too

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Over at iTWire, we are often in the position where we disagree with a fellow writer and say so. This morning, I found my colleague Davey Winder's piece "Opinion: why Linux sucks at being user friendly" to be a litle too general to pass without comment.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Comparison of Python virtual machines

  • What to do if every kernel update break your bootloader settings
  • auto-apt : on-demand package installer
  • 3 More Things Every Good Linux Adminstrator Knows
  • Automatically mount encrypted filesystems at login with pam_mount
  • Tables in OpenOffice.org Impress: New and Unstylish
  • Why Firefox Rocks on Linux: Great Firefox Tricks, Part III
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux
  • More Quick Ways To Find CPU Bottlenecks On Linux

Amarok Insider - Issue 13 Released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: Issue 13 of Amarok Insider, the official Amarok newsletter is out. It discusses the evolution of Amarok's interface, reveals the release plans, covers some of the biggest features of the upcoming version 2.0, and much more. Download links for Windows and OS X versions of the Amarok 2.0 beta are included.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

Filed under
Fluxbox

fosswire.com: When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Wi-Fi Linux network bug found, fixed

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: These days, most of us can use our Wi-Fi cards on Linux using native drivers. Some of us, though, are still stuck with using Windows drivers on Linux. This kludge is usually done by using the Windows driver with NDISwrapper. Unfortunately, it's recently been discovered that there's a crack in the kludge.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

today's howtos