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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla's Rust programming language at critical stage Roy Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:18am
Story E19 ALPHA2: NOW WITH 50% MORE EXPLOSIONS! Roy Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:12am
Story A Bundle of Tor Roy Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:43am
Story Scientific Linux 7 Alpha released - LiveDVD and OS Templates built Roy Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:37am
Story Six Linux home automation clicks Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:25am
Story On NSA Watchlist, Dream Machines, and Ten Tips Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:19am
Story Google launch Android Wear Apps on Play Store Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:16am
Story Systemd 215 Works On Factory Reset, DHCPv4 Server Support Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:08am
Story Wink's Linux Hub and Mobile App Take on Home Automation Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 11:26pm
Story Linux 3.14 Is Now A Long-Term Stable Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 10:30pm

Brazil Appeals OOXML Too! Asks Approval Be Reconsidered

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: South Africa was the first, but not the last. Now Brazil has sent a letter protesting the adoption of OOXML as an ISO standard also, and Andy Updegrove says he has heard there will be more.

VIA’s unfortuante open source deja vu

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

blogs.the451group: Deja vu, the experience of experiencing something that you feel you’ve experienced before, hit me while reading about hardware maker VIA and its latest forays and fumbles in open source.

“OS Wars: The Movie” - Cast Of Actors

Filed under
OS

bizriver.com: In a not too distant present, at a not too distant Interweb, you will bear witness to one of the greatest dramas of our time. An epic battle between equally powerful forces as they struggle for dominance and the hearts and minds of the “Now” generation. I introduce to you, now, the cast of “OS Wars: The Movie”

Linux File Systems: Ready for the Future?

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: My article three weeks ago on Linux file systems set off a firestorm unlike any other I've written in the decade I've been writing on storage and technology issues. My intentions were to relate my experience as an HPC storage consultant and my knowledge of file systems and operating systems to advise readers on the best course of action.

Hands on: Plasma continues to advance in KDE 4.1 beta 1

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The KDE development community has issued the first official KDE 4.1 beta. This release includes the Kontact PIM suite and significant improvements to KDE's Plasma desktop layer.

Give Me 3 Synths, Part 3

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In this final installment to the series I'll double your reading pleasure by presenting two new Linux softsynths. Such a deal, two reviews for the price of one!

Quick look at Kubuntu 8.04 KDE 4 Remix

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Frederik's Blog: A few weeks ago, a researcher at work received a new HP 6910p laptop. As he's a Kubuntu Linux user, we decided to try the new Kubuntu 8.04 KDE 4 remix to get an idea of all the new features in KDE 4.

The Browser Wars : Firefox, Opera, Safari, Internet Explorer and Flock

Filed under
Software

aren-fly.blogspot: Things have finally started moving back towards a level playing field. Internet Explorer’s dominancy is no longer absolute, and web surfers now have lots of choice when deciding which browser they should use.

Novell ushers in Moonlight

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Earlier this month Novell quietly released Moonlight -- a Linux client for Microsoft's Silverlight technology. Silverlight is a .Net-based cross-browser, cross-platform plugin for delivering rich media to the Internet. In a nutshell, it is Microsoft's version of Adobe Flash.

Also: Mono, The Road To Hell: Final Proof

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Add a Feature to Perl 5

  • Install Nvidia Video Drivers and AWN on Fedora 9
  • Screencasts in Ubuntu, part 1
  • Add keyboard shortcuts with KeyTouch
  • Ebuild Protip: Use emerge --debug to figure out what's happening
  • Linux / UNIX View Only Configuration File Directives
  • Argument list too long
  • Ubuntu Tip:How To Get Flash Working in Opera 9.27

Firefox 3 will Kill 3 Birds with 1 Stone

Filed under
Moz/FF

junauza.com: The release date of the third major edition of the hottest web browser on the planet is just around the corner. Firefox has really come a long way and has already revolutionized the way people browse the web. Let's look ahead and analyze the potential impact of this forthcoming mega release.

Also: Firefox 3: The Semantic Web Browser?

Interview: Joel Cohen, writer and associate producer of The Simpsons

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

redhatmagazine.com: Joel Cohen is an Emmy award-winning writer and associate producer of The Simpsons. He’s also a keynote speaker at the Red Hat Summit this June. The show is all hand-drawn and digitally animated, and the movie was too. For that purpose, crudely animated scenes were produced with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Burn Your CDs and DVDs! K3b Review

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: K3b is the KDE CD/DVD burner, capable of burning data CDs/DVDs, as well as CD/DVD ISO images, create audio CDs, rip audio CDs and video DVDs. Statistics show it is the favourite burning application of Linux users.

Compiz 0.7.6 Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Just shy of two months since Compiz 0.7.4 was released, Compiz 0.7.6 is now available. This update has a rewritten Place plug-in to dramatically improve multi-output behavior, configurable multi-output behavior, removed plane plug-in in favor of the wall plug-in, removed cube wallpaper painting in favor of the Compiz Fusion wallpaper plug-in, panel and desktop selection mode is now available in the switcher plug-in, and improved painting behavior.

PCMan Lightweight Alternative File Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: PCMan File Manager (or PCManFM) is a lightweight alternative to GNOME’s Nautilus file manager or Konqueror/Dolphin in KDE. I found it to be an excellent option for more sophisticated GNOME users, as well as those with slower computers.

Slitaz Linux 20080518: Pretty, but not very useful

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Slitaz is one of an increasing number of distributions that came to me out of the blue via a random suggestion. These are quickly becoming my favorites because very often I'm pleasantly surprised by them. At just about 25 megabytes, Slitaz qualifies for the "ultra-lightweight" division.

Will we Ever Have a GPL Test Case?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The GNU General Public License is nearly 20 years old (version 1 came out in 1989). In that time there have been at least 100 million lawsuits filed in the US (and that's a conservative estimate). Amazingly enough, not one of those millions of court cases has actually tested the GPL's validity. How can that be - and is it a problem for the open source software movement?

Fedora Nightlife Project Harnesses Idle Computer Power

ostatic.com: Nightlife will give people the ability "to donate idle capacity from their own computers to an open, general-purpose Fedora-run grid for processing socially beneficial work and scientific research that requires access to large amounts of computing power.

Firefox takes aims at wrong record

Filed under
Moz/FF

daniweb.com/blogs: Now I am not averse to a little innovative marketing, and let's face it Mozilla and Firefox certainly know how to milk the hyperbole cow, but I cannot help but wonder if downloads in a day is the record they ought to be aiming at.

Review: Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring

Filed under
MDV

linux.com: Last month Mandriva announced its latest Spring edition. Despite a few minor glitches, after several weeks of testing the two Mandriva flavors, I have finally come across a distro that gives you the best of the GNU/Linux and proprietary worlds in terms of ease of use, range of software, and stability.

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More in Tux Machines

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more