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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2013 - 8:43am
Story Theme, Ads, Format, Scope, Etc. Roy Schestowitz 6 13/11/2013 - 8:40am
Story Linux 3.13 To Support EFI On ARM Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 9:32pm
Story How did the Outreach Program for Women work out for the Linux kernel this year? Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 7:45pm
Story Updates knocking on the door! Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 7:42pm
Story KDE Edu 2013 sprint Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 7:37pm
Story No Changes in Tux Machines Roy Schestowitz 11 12/11/2013 - 7:10pm
Story The Linux kernel community learns how to grow more penguins Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 6:47pm
Story Hillsboro School District considering open-source solutions in wake of failed bond measure Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 10:18am
Story Tizen camera debuted, Lite tipped, phone delayed Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2013 - 10:13am

I, Robot: The Man Behind the Google Phone

Filed under
Google

nytimes: If the effort succeeds, it will be the most drastic challenge to date of the assertion by Microsoft — the godfather of the desktop PC — that Google and other members of the so-called open-source world can imitate but not innovate.

Power-ups for Firefox: Add-ons bring added security and comfort

Filed under
Moz/FF

bangkok post: Firefox is known as the quintessential free browser. Users can not only download it free of charge, they can also expand its abilities in almost unlimited ways. A dedicated developer community makes this possible by programming and updating special extensions called add-ons.

How badly is CentOS hurting Red Hat?

Filed under
Linux

interopnews.com: Why does Red Hat tolerate CentOS? The Community ENTerprise Operating System is an identical binary clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (minus the trademarks), compiled from the source code RPMs that Red Hat conveniently provides on its FTP site. It is also completely free, as in beer.

Bumps on the Road to Document Exchange Nirvana

eWeeks blogs: At the heart of the rift between the Foundation and the rest of the ODF backers--led by Sun and IBM--lies a dispute over the proper strategy for achieving round-trip document fidelity between Microsoft Office and ODF-consuming applications, such as Sun's OpenOffice.org or IBM's Lotus Symphony.

KAlarm

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Remembering things. It’s something that a lot of us aren’t all that good at, without having something to trigger us. KAlarm is an application which is designed to allow you to set certain things to happen at certain times.

Archlinux tools: AUR

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: You already know Pacman, the Archlinux software manager. Now it’s time to meet AUR and yaourt, the extra tools that can bring a fistful of apps on your desktop within just a few console commands.

The Road to Ubuntu - Backup Salvation

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: After several weeks of anguish I've finally recreated my Windows XP file backup regime under Gutsy Gibbon, overcoming my fear of the Linux command line in the process.

Review: openSuSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

anurag.acespace.co.uk: Although I wasn't the first one to download the latest version of openSuSE, I was still one of the first to do so, believe me. SuSE was the first Linux distribution that I used to fix my roots in the Linux world. So, I've an attachment with this flavor of Linux in particular. But I won't be partial in this review, not even a bit. I'll present my review on Novell's openSuSE 10.3 in an easy-to-understand manner, that is, topic-wise:

Linux desktop lacks innovation

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: Microsoft is complaining that "the Linux desktop including OpenOffice" infringes some 235 Microsoft patents. An objective comparison between the whole Linux desktop and Microsoft's Windows desktop shows that it has a good point; there are many resemblances, from trivial to profound.

The truth about the linux desktop market share

Filed under
Linux

technocrat.net: Duke Nukem Forever and Linux on the desktop... To understand the markets you have to know something about magicians, and how they work.

ATI Open vs. Closed-Source Performance

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Friday we had delivered benchmarks comparing the performance of the open-source Radeon driver against the new closed-source fglrx driver from AMD. In addition to these Compiz benchmarks, on the same system we had also ran some additional benchmarks to see for gaming and 2D rendering how the two ATI Linux drivers compare.

DesktopBSD Day 4 - Software Management Snags

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Let’s continue with software management. I expected to wake up with a completely updated system, ready to receive further instructions in order to become a fully usable open source desktop. What I got was a system that had halted at 75%. Various updates hadn’t finished successfully. Today I spend most of my time playing with that.

Zenwalk 4.8 Review

Filed under
Linux

I am just in love with xfce based distributions; they are fast, simple and elegant and Zenwalk is no exception. It has a really good control center and out-of-box multimedia support. Except for few initial hick-ups (network card module) it is really user friendly. I would recommend it to new Linux users.

Don't complain. Do something useful instead.

Life throws us curve balls, but how we react or respond to a given situation is what really matters.

The year of the Linux desktop has finally arrived

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: While Windows advocates may smirk and say here we go again, as 2007 draws to a close I get the strong feeling that we may look back upon this year and recognize it with hindsight as the year that the Linux desktop finally arrived. There are a number of events that point to 2007 as being the turning point for Linux.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MP3s On Ubuntu - The OGG Alternative

  • how to create animate gif from your mobile video
  • Short Tip: Extract Files from an RPM file
  • Howto Setup firefox for kmail

An interview with matthew

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: The management of the Ubuntuforums includes a Forums Council, which was established in the past year as a way of integrating the forum community into the greater Ubuntu framework. The council is presently made up of forum administrators; matthew — a writer, guitarist and father — is one of them.

How to dual-boot Vista with Linux (Adding Linux on Vista machine)

Filed under
HowTos

blorge.com: If you want to explore and enjoy both Vista and Linux world in a single PC, then you have to configure your PC to handle dual-boot system. It may sound difficult but it’s really within the knowledge of average computer users. Here are the steps to add Linux on your Vista system for a dual boot.

Also: GSoC: final look at Bootloader Manager

Torus-trooper: a shoot-’em-up in a tunnel

Filed under
Software
Gaming

DPotD: Torus-trooper is a pretty nice abstract shoot-’em-up taking place in what could be called a space tunnel. You drive some kind of ship or car who has to stay on the sides of the tunnel, and shoot bad enemies.

Also: Read Comic Books with Jomic

Installing Songbird 0.3 Developer Pre-Release On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide shows how to install the Songbird media player (0.3 Developer Pre-Release) on an Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) desktop. Songbird is a free software audio player with media database capabilities written using XUL and VLC, with an interface similar to Apple's iTunes.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface
    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.
  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6
    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.