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Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story It's Official: OpenMandriva Association Incorporated srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 10:48pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 8:06pm
Story Designing the new Ubuntu for phone pages srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 8:03pm
Story How to un-break GNOME menus srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 8:00pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 7:44am
Story User Guide To Setting Up The Raspberry PI srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:55am
Story Open source is legal software alternative srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:49am
Story ioquake3 move srlinuxx 03/01/2013 - 2:44am
Blog entry Ubuntu Phone, Good idea? fieldyweb 02/01/2013 - 8:36pm
Story Choosing a text editor srlinuxx 02/01/2013 - 6:58pm

Open Source Supporters Question Microsoft Motives — Again

Filed under
OSS

itbusinessedge.com: Bloggers and tech journalists are still trading barbs over Chris DiBona’s reaction to Microsoft’s OSI submission, it seems. In his Open Source Guy blog, Guy Snir points to a comment piece in The Register in which Ashlee Vance argues that it’s “near impossible not to take Microsoft’s side here.” Google is a bigger threat to open source than Microsoft is, in his view.

How to get local email under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

the inquirer: IF YOU'RE a Linux user and, like yours truly, not really a professional full-time Unix/Linux sysadmin, you might also be puzzled like I was about how to set up Postfix to route local system-generated email to your email client. If you're not a Linux user, or not curious, you can stop reading here, because this article is about how to solve that problem.

Wolvix 1.1.0 - A Very Flexible Animal

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Caitlyn Martin: Back in my January review of Vector Linux 5.8 Standard, the version with the Xfce desktop, I touted Vector Linux as the fastest distro with a reasonable feature set and selection of software that I had used at the time. It took a while but I finally found a distribution that’s at least Vector’s equal: Wolvix 1.1.0.

Ubuntu founder advises SA on IT strategy

Filed under
Misc

tectonic: Speaking in a keynote address at the Govtech conference in Cape Town this morning, Mark Shuttleworth discussed strategies that government should take on in developing IT locally.

SIMILE Exhibit: Data publishing for the rest of us

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Tools like phpMyEdit allow you to create a quick-and-dirty front end to a database, but what if you need to publish a spreadsheet or BibTeX file on your Web site and give your visitors the ability to dynamically sort, filter, group, and visualize the published data? For that, you can turn to SIMILE Exhibit.

Back At Louderback: Why I'm Sticking With Windows Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

Alexander Wolfe: Outgoing PC Magazine editor Jim Louderback has caused quite a stir with his column slamming Vista. Me, I'm sticking with Microsoft's glitzy, though resource-hogging, operating system.

Linus Torvalds talks future of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

apcmag: What's happening with kernel version 2.6? Will there be a version 3.0? What has Linus been up to lately? What does he get up to in his spare time? I had the opportunity to chat with the original creator of the Linux kernel, Linus Torvalds, in a number of email exchanges.

Zonbu GNU/Linux computer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

freesoftware mag: Zonbu GNU/Linux is a new, environmentally-friendly, compact PC available from Zonbu. It includes some features that really make it stand out from other PCs. Last, but not least, it comes with GNU/Linux. In this article, I will give you some of the highlights and thoughts of my experience with Zonbu.

New Adobe Linux Flash Player Released

Filed under
Software

adobe blogs: There is a new beta of the Flash Player Update available. That's right: the beta is even available for Linux (same time as Windows and Mac).

A guide to better understanding the KDE 3.5 Konsole

Filed under
KDE

raiden's realm: One of the greatest tools of any Linux or BSD system is the console. There are numerous different shells that go with it as well as graphical interfaces to allow you to make use of it. In this overview we will be covering just one of those applications, namely the KDE "Konsole" graphical console interface application.

Sun ODF plugin chokes on Office 2007

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Users regularly cite lack of compatibility with Microsoft Office files as a reason for not using OpenOffice.org. OpenOffice.org does include Microsoft Office export filters, as well as a number of settings for increased compatibility, but these features provide only good, not complete, compatibility. For this reason, Sun Microsystems' ODF Plugin for Microsoft Office, released earlier this year, sounded like good news.

Nvidia has Linux security hole

Filed under
Security

the inquirer: AN ADVISORY from a security researcher called Gregory Shikhman points out that Nvidia drivers have a rather gaping hole when installed under Gentoo Linux.

Sidux 2007-03 'Gaia' -- a quick look

Filed under
Linux

I come from a Mandriva/Mandrake/PCLinuxOS background. I'm a KDE guy who also installs gnome apps. I've not ever installed Debian, and I've used Debian derived distros very little. So, how does Sidux measure up for me?

Linux: Supporting Older GCC Releases

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A recent bug report led to a discussion about potentially dropping support for pre-4.0 versions of GCC. Adrian Bunk noted, "currently we support 6 different stable gcc release series, and it might be the right time to consider dropping support for the older ones. Are there any architectures still requiring a gcc < 4.0 ?"

Lesser Known Applications for Linux — Screenwriting

Filed under
Software

richardfcrawley.wordpress: This is the third article in a series highlighting lesser known applications for Linux. This installment will review applications that aid in writing screenplays, plays, and novels.

some extra stuff:

Filed under
News
  • Simple commands for Linux.

  • Top 5 Reasons to Move from RHEL to SLE
  • Zonbu Mini PC: Boom or Boo-Boo?
  • Hidden Linux : Replicating software setups
  • Better than iTunes on Linux Walmart Selling DRM free songs
  • uniq linux command
  • 'What Linux now needs'
  • Has Google become evil in the eyes of open source?
  • KDE Mountain View release party details
  • ipcalc: network calculator on the command line

Kudos WhyFirefoxIsBlocked.com

Filed under
Web

Why is it hard for people to understand that there is nothing called "Free Lunch"?

GIMP Tutorial: Hot text on flames / fire

Filed under
HowTos

Technoworld: There are many ways to create fire text, but believe me, no other text is looking that cool and real as this one Wink Of course it maybe a lil' more effort to get it. I will show you how to create such a hot flames text with GIMP.

Cheese brings Photobooth functionality to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Cheese is a relatively new open source webcam application for Linux that supports image and video capture and allows users to apply visual effects. Created by Daniel Siegel for Google's Summer of Code program, Cheese closely resembles a Mac OS X program called Photobooth.

Video Editing Options for Linux

Filed under
Software

Digital Filmmaking Blog: We know our video editing applications for Windows (read Adobe Premiere, AVID, Ulead Video studio etc) and Mac (Final Cut Pro!), but what about video editing on a Linux powered system? Well here's a list of video editing applications for your Linux PC:

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Games

What is Linux?

Leftovers: OSS

  • ISS Federal Lead Rob Rogers on Agencies’ Open Source Moves & ‘Information Advantage’ Efforts
    ExecutiveBiz recently caught up with ISS Federal Systems Vice President Rob Rogers for this interview to discuss ongoing data-related trends in government and where he sees agencies prioritizing efforts in that arena, plus his ideas for how the government should approach open source methodology. [...] We have seen a significant shift in the past five years around agencies adopting and embracing open source methods. For one, open source technology is the primary catalyst behind some of the most significant progress related to the evolution of “big data” and analytic capabilities, which is used pervasively in the intelligence community. Certain agencies have contributed major projects to the open source community, which further solidifies their position on supporting open source. One notable example is NSA’s contribution of NiFi and Accumulo to the Apache Software Foundation in 2014. If these types of actions are an indicator of the direction that the IC agencies are heading in their support of open source, then the future is bright.
  • Davos 2017: China unites 25 countries to establish Global Blockchain Business Council
    On January 17, the governmental and industrial representatives from China and 25 other countries gathered in Davos, Switzerland for the Davos Forum. According to the latest update provided by Tai Cloud Corporation to EconoTimes, Jamie Elizabeth Smith, the former spokesperson and special assistant of the U.S. president Obama, announced that the Global Blockchain Business Council (GBBC) is formally established. The first national team members include senior executives of World Bank Mariana Dahan, former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former Prime Minister of Haidi Laurent Lamont, former Economy Minister of Ukraine Aivaras Abromavičius.
  • Intel's BigDL deep learning framework snubs GPUs for CPUs
    Last week Intel unveiled BigDL, a Spark-powered framework for distributed deep learning, available as an open source project. With most major IT vendors releasing machine learning frameworks, why not the CPU giant, too? What matters most about Intel's project may not be what it offers people building deep learning solutions on Spark clusters, but what it says about Intel’s ambitions to promote hardware that competes with GPUs for those applications.
  • Google's VR art app is open source and ready to get weird
    Google's Tilt Brush is capable of some pretty impressive results. But what if those 3D paintings and projects you made while strapped into virtual reality could escape into the real world?
  • How is your community promoting diversity?
    Open source software is a great enabler for technology innovation. Diversity unlocks innovation and drives market growth. Open source and diversity seem like the ultimate winning combination, yet ironically open source communities are among the least diverse tech communities. This is especially true when it comes to inherent diversity: traits such as gender, age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.
  • Walmart’s Contributions to Open Source
    You might first think about open source in the context of outstanding tools for lean startup companies, but open source also finds a welcome home in behemoth, established companies, such as Walmart. In this O’Reilly OSCON video interview with Walmart Lab’s Alex Grigoryan, learn how Walmart both benefits from and contributes back to open source. The key takeaway? Open source allows you to reuse software components in labor saving ways.
  • Librecore: Aiming To Be A Better Libre Spin Of Coreboot
    Librecore is a new project aiming to be a new Coreboot downstream with a focus remaining on providing fully-free system firmware. Separately, Minifree/Libreboot has been accused (and admitted by Leah Rowe) to not paying a vendor for a completed contract. Librecore was formed due to "[Libreboot lead developer Leah Rowe] alienating large portions of the community, plus the stagnant and hard to use libreboot firmware and build system." With Librecore, they are aiming to use industry-standard tools and build environments. Another different design decision is pursuing Petitboot as the payload for a more modern and useful interface over GRUB as a payload.
  • Use of open source software growing across telecom
    Open source software may still be a new model for the telecommunications industry, but it’s rapidly gaining traction as operators look to mimic computing world. While the open source community has quickly gaining ground in the computing space, the traditional telecommunications industry has a history of hardening its siloed approach to networking technology. This was especially apparent at a time when most mobile telecom networks were 2G-based, with 3G technology just coming online in more advanced markets.
  • Open Source Software: What Every In-House Counsel Should Know
    Open source software (OSS) is ubiquitous in software development today, enabling technical innovation, productivity gains, and touching everything from big data and cloud to mobile and embedded. Control modules on the market today commonly include OSS components such as real-time operating systems, libraries, data interfaces, firmware, and display software.
  • 4 Common Open Source License Compliance Failures and How to Avoid Them
    Companies or organizations that don’t have a strong open source compliance program often suffer from errors and limitations in processes throughout the software development cycle that can lead to open source compliance failures. The previous article in this series covered common intellectual property failures. This time, we’ll discuss the four common open source license compliance failures and how to avoid them.

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.