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About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 13.10: It just works srlinuxx 15/10/2013 - 7:24pm
Story Running SilverStripe On Nginx (LEMP) On Debian Wheezy/Ubuntu 13.04 falko 15/10/2013 - 11:21am
Story Debian 7.2 Update Released srlinuxx 15/10/2013 - 4:07am
Story Notable Ubuntu Derivatives srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 10:20pm
Story I tried Fedora 19 KDE one more time srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 10:17pm
Story Mageia 3 Review srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 10:00pm
Story Debian Project News - October 14th srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 9:58pm
Story can you use Linux or not srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 7:59pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 529 srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 5:38pm
Story 15 Ways to Reduce Image Size srlinuxx 14/10/2013 - 5:35pm

Why Linux Will Succeed On The Desktop

Filed under
Linux

informationweek: I believe Linux will become the de-facto standard desktop operating system. Though it'll take a while for many users to break free from ties to Windows, there is good reason to believe that this day will come.

Ubuntu vs OpenSUSE

Filed under
Ubuntu

abhay-techzone.blogspot: OpenSUSE impresses from the first boot, of the install CD, itself. I was greeted with a beautiful screen screen. Ubuntu too does a good job but them SUSE reflects elegance.

Microsoft Not to Open Source Codes in China

Filed under
Microsoft

tradingmarkets.com: It is still unknown whether Microsoft would fulfill the obligations in the Chinese market. An insider remarked that China just passed the antitrust law and has not put it into effect officially, so it is impossible for the company to come up with a timetable for the disclosure of its source codes.

Computer Dealers short of staff trained to Install Ubuntu Linux ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

oskanpur.wordpress: Kanpur and Lucknow computer dealers who have for years been selling proprietary operating systems are suddenly realizing that they themselves know very little about Ubuntu Linux operating system for desktops.

Being a good netizen – protecting Linux from network nasties

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Microsoft Windows attracts virus writers and malware like faeces attracts flies. On the far opposite end of the spectrum, Linux users never find themselves embroiled in debates over whether Norton AntiVirus is bloated or essential, or whether AVG is better than e-Trust. Yet, Linux users do need to put thought and effort into security tools and here’s why.

Open source project aims to overhaul music search

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Software that listens to and analyzes music is driving a Sun open source project, which aims to build a music recommendation system that surpasses the systems used today by iTunes and Amazon.

Overcoming the Fear of Linux CLI

Filed under
HowTos

junauza.blogspot.com: I will list some indispensable commands and keyboard shortcuts with their corresponding functions to guide the fearful in their journey to conquer the horror of using the Linux terminal.

Creating a book template with Writer

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: While Writer allows you to create an advanced book template that consists of a master document and a number of subdocuments, there are situations where using a simpler, one-file template makes more sense. The main advantage of a one-file book template is that it helps you to work around two major problems in Writer.

few leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to fix broken Firefox extensions

  • Transformation at Red Hat?
  • All pieces together (Lancelot)
  • Noncertified Linux professionals make more than certified peers
  • How to be a faithful fan

Choosing a Desktop for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

itmanagement: "It's like starting another operating system," a colleague complained recently when he switched from the GNOME to the KDE desktop. He was exaggerating, but the impression is accurate.

Lotus Symphony Linux Beta Review

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: Recently I’ve laid my hands on the new IBM’s child — Lotus Symphony (beta version). It is an office suite based on OpenOffice.org. Lotus Symphony includes text editor, spreadsheet and presentation tool. I’ve, decided to try this new IBM wonder.

The OpenOffice.org Impress presenter screen

Filed under
OOo

LWN: While OpenOffice.org's Impress is a reasonable presentation program, it lacks one often-requested feature: the provision of a separate screen for the presenter. So it is encouraging that the OOo developers have just announced that this feature is now in development.

An open letter to Steve Ballmer from Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

François Bancilhon: We recently closed a deal with the Nigerian Government. Maybe you heard about it, Steve. They were looking for an affordable hardware+software solution for their schools. The initial batch was 17,000 machines. Then your people entered the game and the deal got more competitive.

Commandline Interface

Overcoming THE FEAR

Filed under
OSS

penguin pete: This being Halloween, it seems appropriate to talk about fear. Why don't more desktop users adapt to free computing? THE FEAR. The command line. Scary stuff, for some.

Living with Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

linuxtechdaily: When Mandriva 2008 came out, I decided to stick with it, day in and day out and see how I felt. This isn’t a review, just a look at my experience with it. For those wanting a review, I’ll imitate one in one paragraph!

Fedora struggles with harm reduction via Codec Buddy

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: In public health, harm reduction is a practice that, rather than trying to eradicate potentially dangerous choices like prostitution, tries to minimize their effects. Often, the practice involves a limited condoning of the practice, such as safe injection sites for addicts. Harm reduction is the path that Fedora 8 has chosen on the issue of MP3 and other non-free codecs in the form of Codec Buddy.

The Command Line is Part of the Desktop!

Filed under
Linux

Don't be a "Putzbuntu!"

Why Mr. and Ms. Desktop Distro need to discover the Command Line. Part one of a series that may never end.

Halloween XII: What’s really behind those Microsoft licenses?

Filed under
OSS

zdnet blogs: In the last week of October 1998, a confidential Microsoft memo detailing their strategy against Linux and Open source was leaked to Eric S. Raymond, who annotated it and posted it on the web. This became known as the first Halloween Document. Between 1998 and 2004 Eric posted 10 other Halloween Documents. Now it’s 2007...

Squandering one of the industry's best open source talents

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: I think Miguel de Icaza is an exceptional developer and effective community leader. I can't help but wonder why he's squandering his talents on writing largely irrelevant code (Mono, Moonlight) that appeals to himself, Novell, Microsoft, and no one else.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases