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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian Etch is now frozen prior to release

Filed under
Linux

In case you missed the annoucement yesterday Debian Etch has now been frozen for release. This means that the distribution won't receive automatic updates over the next few days and weeks. Instead only "targetted" package updates will be made.

Shocking:World of Warcraft Patch 2.0 Gold Grinding Bug!

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Gaming

Blizzard released the latest patch for World of Warcraft on 5th Dec. Recently, a gold farmer revealed that the new patch had a big gold grinding bug.

The Mandriva Flash controversy

Filed under
MDV

By now, you should probably have heard about our new product: Mandriva Flash. However, what you might ignore, is that inside the company this product is surrounded by a lot of controversy.

ubuntu linux on Playstation 3 Screens

Filed under
Ubuntu

What's up next in Linux desktop standardization?

Filed under
Software

Over the past week, some of the Linux desktop's foremost developers gathered together in Portland, Oregon at the OSDL (Open Source Development Labs) Desktop Architects Meeting to work further on bringing order to the Linux desktop.

Craigslist, Spies Injected Into Hans Reiser Hearing

Filed under
Reiser

Antonios Zografos, an Oakland man who dated Nina Reiser for about eight months before she disappeared, said he became concerned when he couldn't reach her by phone the afternoon of Sept. 3, as they had planned to meet around 5:30 p.m. to have dinner and see a movie.

Novell-Microsoft tout survey results

Filed under
SUSE

The companies commissioned a study of 201 computing industry decision makers that found 95 percent of respondents approved of the collaboration.

Zenwalk: A Slackware desktop alternative

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Zenwalk is a lightweight desktop oriented Slackware based GNU/Linux distribution that aims to be fast and user friendly. It is still quite new, but the growth, as well as the progress of development, has been pretty fast so far. I've taken a hike with the latest release, Zenwalk 4.0, and here's what I can say about it.

Five steps to improve your Linux migration experience

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Linux

You've dabbled in the Linux waters, liked what you've seen and want to give Linux a sincere shot on your desktop systems. Here are some fundamental steps you can take that will greatly improve your Linux experience and increase your chances of actually sticking with Linux as a long-term solution.

Attorney puts missing woman's character on trial

Filed under
Reiser

The defense attorney representing murder suspect Hans Reiser painted missing mother Nina Reiser as a woman who had been engaging in deviant sexual behavior and whose family has ties to Russian secret police and intelligence agencies.

Also: The 7-year-old son of an Oakland man charged with murdering his wife testified in court today that he hadn't heard his parents arguing the day police believe that she was killed.

On the Bench: OpenSUSE 10.2

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Reviews
SUSE

Suse 7.2 was my first Linux distribution ever, around five years ago. I was impressed but also had to struggle with all kinds of issues. That was part of the fun. I remember the sales pitch that working with Linux is like working on the engine of a car while it is running. You were supposed to fix things as you went along. Ever since, the distributions became more and more userfriendly.

Vector Linux 5.8 RC3 - Slackware that works and grows on you

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

So a Canadian friend of mine told me of a project up north (not too far north from Seattle where I live) called Vector. I started tracking the project back and noticed they had many of the attributes of Linux I like; XFce, Full working media, Claims of Fast performance and slimmed down instead of bloated packages.

Xandros Desktop Professional 4.1 review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There are several "business," "corporate," or "professional" desktop operating systems on the market today, all aimed at seeping into large corporations that already use GNU/Linux on servers. It's a pretty good plan, and most of the operating systems in this arena are pretty good -- not perfect, but pretty good. Xandros has had such a product for a while now, and it's always been near the top of the list in terms of features and quality. The market is now mature and the products are more competitive, though, and the product formerly known as Xandros Business Desktop, while still a good operating system, isn't keeping up with the industry's pace.

Stable kernel 2.6.19.1 released

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Linux

The first stable update to 2.6.19 is out. It has a fairly long list of fixes, a couple of which are security-related. Interestingly, it seems that the fix for the core dump vulnerability, applied in 2.6.17.4, did not really fix the problem; hopefully the 2.6.19.1 version will be more successful.

openSUSE 10.2: the best Linux desktop yet?

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Reviews
SUSE

First impressions are important, and openSUSE 10.2 made a strong enough impression with me that I may be making openSUSE 10.2 my new desktop OS. I installed openSUSE 10.2 RC1 soon after its release in late November, and I've been kicking the tires on the final release since it was made public last Thursday. Here's my report.

The scanner, the network and a saned

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HowTos

Nowdays just about everyone has a scanner. Most business that I know and many private homes with several computers have a network running. All you need is the scanner, a network and the saned daemon.

Open source conference opens in Paris next month

Filed under
OSS

Solutions Linux / Solutions Open Source 2007, billed as the "biggest professional fair in Europe dedicated to open source solutions," will be held Jan. 30 through Feb. 1 at the Paris Expo. The event caters to professionals dedicated to working with Linux, open source, and free software.

Preliminary hearing for Hans Reiser begins today

Filed under
Reiser

The preliminary hearing for Hans Reiser on charges that he murdered his wife Nina Reiser began today with testimony from the woman Nina Reiser was supposed to meet on the day she disappeared.

SUSE 10.2 Review

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Reviews
SUSE

The biggest Linux event this December is without a doubt the new release of SUSE. It was announced early, the scheduled date was met and on the 7th of December the much awaited SUSE 10.2 was out and available for download.

Pepping up OOo Writer documents with sparklines

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HowTos

Big graphs are not the only way to visualize data in a text document. Using a couple of tricks, you can spice up your OpenOffice.org Writer documents with sparklines -- word-sized graphs embedded into text. Developed by infographic guru Edward Tufte, sparklines provide a simple yet effective way of visualizing data directly in the text body of the document.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more