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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:33pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:26pm
Story ChromeOS 42.0.2311.87 (Official Build) (64-bit) – A brief look Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 10:07pm
Story Debian 8.0 Installer RC3 "Jessie" Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 8:30pm
Story LibreOffice 5.0 to Arrive in July, Bug Hunt Organized Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 8:21pm
Story KaOS 2015.04 is here -- Download the KDE-focused Linux distro now! Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 8:16pm
Story What Your CIO Needs to Know About Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 7:46pm
Story Elementary OS Freya 0.3 review Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 7:36pm
Story Evolving KDE: Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution In The Community Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 7:27pm
Story How open source grew up Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 12:03pm

Ubuntu 9.04 Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Beta

  • Ubuntu 9.04 - Jaunty Jackalope
  • Package caching for Ubuntu (and Debian) lovers
  • Concurrent Booting: make full use of your dual-core, multithreaded or hyperthreaded processors in Ubuntu
  • Linux Mint 6 KDE

Shutter on Ubuntu: is this the mother of all free software Screenshot Utilities?

Filed under
Linux

Like anyone else who writes about software I like to illustrate my text with timely and relevant screenshots; so I’m always on the lookout for good, free software to get the job done.

Six Best Portable Operating Systems

Filed under
Linux

lifehacker.com: Why restrict yourself to merely carrying around your data on a thumb drive? Take your entire operating system on your flash drive.

Give Ubuntu Jaunty An Apple Flavour

Filed under
Ubuntu

bigbrovar.wordpress: The cool thing about linux is that it can be and look like anything you want, and why you may never be able to tweak your Mac or Windows to look like Gnome, its the direct opposite with Linux. So this month i decide to give my laptop an apple flavor.

Virtualization With KVM On A CentOS 5.2 Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a CentOS 5.2 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Six Interesting Gnome Panel Applets

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: Six Interesting Gnome Panel Applets

Antique Linux on an Antique PC

Filed under
Linux

crashedpips.co.uk: Lying about somewhere in my loft, I uncovered a Targa TS30AS laptop, from sometime in the early to mid 1990s. It fell well within the system requirements for version 1.1 buzz of Debian GNU/Linux.

goplay: discover interesting packages

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: goplay is a package browser that lets you find interesting packages that you didn’t knew before. It uses DebTags (categories to describe Debian packages) to classify the packages.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Changing Time Zone

  • 3D Desktop switch on Ubuntu
  • Control Your Music From The Panel
  • Jaunty, Thunderbird 3 and Lightning
  • Installing FogBugz the Debian way
  • Most efficient ways to download
  • Microsoft locking out free software formats
  • How Microsoft Changes the Prices at OEMs to Block Linux Sales
  • Kubuntu items now in Ubuntu USA shop
  • Three reasons to buy an old computer
  • When you're in Open Source your error longevity is nearly eternal
  • Linux Outlaws 86 - Pointless Use of Noughts
  • Using open source to reduce business risk
  • How to make an infinite mirror with Ubuntu [HOW TO]
  • FLOSS Weekly 64: The Open Source Bridge conference
  • The Sharecropper Model for Commercial Open Source
  • Notification Disappointment in Ubuntu Jaunty

Zen For Ubuntu Users

Filed under
Linux

zenlife.comze.com: I am reading a lot of posts where new users are completely discourages by the seemingly over-complexity of Linux. They have the Windows background and they use Linux like it was Windows. The learning curve in Linux can be steep.

Stepping away from evangelism

Filed under
OSS

brucebyfield.wordpress: I rarely evangelize about FOSS when face to face. While I will argue in favor of FOSS in articles, or in speech, I hardly ever do so in casual conversation.

Ordering Ubuntu on a Dell Laptop

Filed under
Hardware

red-gecko.blogspot: It was time to replace the old Latitude 110L that had been my main blogging device, and since I've been running Ubuntu for a couple of years, I thought, "Why not order a Dell with Ubuntu pre-installed?" I'm so naive.

Guake Terminal reaches 0.4 and looks mature

Filed under
Software

stefanoforenza.com: While the project has been active for years, the first releases were a little bit buggy, so I ended up uninstalling it without looking back.

Review: KTorrent 3.2.1 - Popular BitTorrent Client for KDE

Filed under
Reviews

A few days ago I reviewed Deluge, a powerful BitTorrent client for GNOME, so today I will continue in the same manner with the latest release of its KDE counterpart, the popular KTorrent.

Windows 7, Mac OS X and Ubuntu: A Tale of Three Operating Systems

Filed under
OS

technovia.co.uk: In a couple of weeks I’ll be switching my main computer back to Ubuntu from Windows 7. But the reason isn’t exasperation with Windows 7, and it’s not one that should give Mac fans hoping that the new Microsoft OS will be a failure any kind of comfort.

News in KDE 4.3

Filed under
KDE

ivan.fomentgroup.org: Since Air is coming along nicely (thanks Nuno), it was the time to make the files Lancelot needs for it. Although there are a few things yet to do, I’m quite satisfied with it. I’m even using Air as my Plasma theme now.

Linux Store Open for Business: A Fantastic Voyage

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: I saw a netbook at a discount chain store the other day that I want. It's an Acer Aspire One. It has 1GB RAM and a 160GB Hard Drive for $296. Awesome deal. The problem, at least for me, is that it comes standard with some whittled down version of Windows XP.

Opera 10 Beta ‘Turbo’ - Does It Still Have What It Takes?

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com/: Opera, I think, doesn’t get the attention it deserves. Maybe it’s the marketing, maybe people remember just the old days when Opera was shareware. Today we’re going to look at Opera Beta build 10.00 1, also dubbed as ‘Turbo’.

Checklist for fresh Ubuntu installs

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: Each time I (re)install Ubuntu on my laptop or home PC or on a friend’s laptop, I always forget some or the other software which I have to download at a later date. This is sometimes troublesome.

Moblin Linux - Test drive the future

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Thinking globally, I decided to test Moblin, a Linux optimized for the next generation of mobile devices. Alongside Windows Embedded, Google Android and iPhone, Moblin is a strong candidate for low-power machines that are going to flood the market in the coming years.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users
    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots. Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.
  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base
    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.
  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support
    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.
  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux
    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta. I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?
    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now
    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive. If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.
  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing
    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant. It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

Android Leftovers