Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GPL policing to include Linux and Samba srlinuxx 29/05/2012 - 7:35pm
Blog entry Panel-Docklet: A must-install extension for GNOME 3 finid 29/05/2012 - 10:06am
Blog entry Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon preview finid 29/05/2012 - 9:42am
Story Scorecard - Linux Mint 13 and Mageia 2 srlinuxx 29/05/2012 - 12:08am
Story Precision and purpose: Ubuntu 12.04 and the Unity HUD reviewed srlinuxx 29/05/2012 - 12:05am
Story Debian Project News - May 28th srlinuxx 29/05/2012 - 12:04am
Blog entry ROSA Marathon 2012 review finid 27/05/2012 - 9:11am
Story some leftovers & stuff: srlinuxx 26/05/2012 - 9:54pm
Story Distro Review: Linux Mint 13 “Maya” Cinnamon Edition srlinuxx 26/05/2012 - 9:40pm
Story Red Hat Earnings: Two Months Later srlinuxx 26/05/2012 - 9:38pm

Manage partitions and disks with GParted-Clonezilla live CD

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Backing up partitions and hard disks sounds like work -- until you've tried Clonezilla. With Clonezilla you can clone and duplicate partitions of various formats and disks of various sizes locally or over the network.

Firefox Still Gaining On IE

Filed under
Moz/FF

webpronews: Firefox, the popular alternative to Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser is picking up steam worldwide, gaining one percent in market share in the past six months.

Edubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Out of all of the Ubuntu derivative distributions, the one that's received the least amount of attention really has been Edubuntu. With a slogan of "Linux for Young Human Beings", Edubuntu is a Linux distribution designed for students and use in school environments.

Is Ubuntu the way forward for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews

ITPro: During the last three years Ubuntu has sprung from nothing to become the most popular desktop distribution of Linux. There are good reasons for Ubuntu's success. Ubuntu is clean and uncomplicated which makes it attractive to entry level users, without sacrificing the traditional Debian virtues of stability, flexibility and configurability, which has made it an enticing proposition for developers.

Solution: Preventing damage after a system lockup

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Tutorials: No matter how stable the Linux kernel is, things like hardware failures can still lock up your system quite effectively. If you ever encounter a case like that, rebooting is pretty much the only option. However, there is rebooting and rebooting. This solution describes a way to reboot your system that will do things like terminating all processes, syncing the remounting the disks, in order to prevent damage as much as possible. This can save you a lot of fscking and data loss.

SUSE vs. Ubuntu - first impressions

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: I’ve used SUSE Linux before, but that was way back in the day of version 9. Things have changed a lot since then. I’ve been happily using Kubuntu 7.04 for a while now, but wanted to begin using SUSE on a daily basis so that I can test their emerging set of educational software.

Command line tip - peek into the start and end of files

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Sometimes, especially when dealing with log files, you might want to peek at the start and/or end of a file to see just that bit of the file and not the whole thing. Of course, there are a couple of easy commands that allow you to do this.

Also: Change Ubuntu’s default paper size from A4 to Letter

Making Gnash: a well-deserved name?

Filed under
Software

freesoftware mag: Gnash is the Free Software Foundation’s alternative Apple Flash player. Version 0.8 is the third alpha release, and frankly, it rocks! It is also one of the first projects to be covered by the GPLv3.

Security Beefed Up for Linux

cxotoday.com: All infrastructure, regardless of underlying platform, need to be secured and protected through multiple layers of security. Linux systems are not an exception. The inherent security advantages of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the Application Stack combined with Symantec's Critical System Protection, gives Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs) a standards-based foundation for a variety of application workloads.

Emacs 22 enhancements make venerable editor flashy again

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Emacs 22.1 hit the street a month ago, a long-awaited update to the GNU project's customizable and extensible do-everything super-editor that has been six years in the making. Here's a look at what you'll find in the new version.

Setting up a Layer 3 tunneling VPN with using OpenSSH

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: This article describes how to use the new tunneling features of OpenSSH V 4.3 to establish a VPN between two Debian or Debian-like systems. Note that by tunneling I am referring to layer-3 IP-in-SSH tunneling, not the TCP connection forwarding that most people refer to as tunneling.

Bring Out the GIMP Part 1: GIMP Basics

Filed under
GIMP

maximumpc.com: No matter which Linux distro you run, chances are it came with a magnificent little image editor called GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program). Unlike Paint and other free-with-your-OS image editors, GIMP is a full featured graphics app with a broad range of capabilities that rival those os Adobe Photoshop.

Open Source Gaming Review: Linux Gamers Live DVD 0.9.2

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: Being an avid gamer who loves Linux, I felt that it would be a good idea to go try out the new Linux-Gamers.net live dvd. This is a live dvd built on Arch Linux and designed with one purpose in mind. Gaming.

Configure GMail in Evolution, Thunderbird or KMail

Filed under
HowTos

debianadmin: Many of us would like to use our GMail accounts in Evolution, and to a lesser degree Thunderbird and KMail. Here is a step by step guide on how to configure Evolution, Thunderbird and KMail to access you GMail account.

A Useful Hack for Storing Text or Editable Pictures You Need to Reuse, in OpenOffice Impress Presentations

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: My friend Ben Horst wrote to me with a question about how to store editable content in a presentation that you reuse periodically. Like a few buttons formatted a particular way, text boxes, anything that can't easily be drawn and formatted and has to look a certain way. My answer was, well, kind of a hack, but I think it's useful enough to point out.

Fedora 7.0 Linux distribution

Filed under
Reviews

PC Advisor: Fedora 7.0 is the latest community-based Linux release from Red Hat. Fedora and Novell's OpenSuse are Ubuntu Linux's two chief "competitors". All three Linux distros are free downloads; all have vibrant online communities where you can go for tips, troubleshooting and advice. And all three Linux distributions will hook you up with a modern, friendly environment that you can start exploring right away.

Are top Linux developers losing the will to code?

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk: Core Linux developers are finding themselves managing and checking, rather than coding, as the number of kernel contributors grows and the contributor network becomes more complex.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 209

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Clement Lefebvre, Linux Mint

  • Feedback: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: GPL 3, Google Desktop, GNU/Linux distro timeline, YaSTRS for openSUSE, PC-BSD LiveCD, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0.2
  • Released last week: Dreamlinux 2.2 "Multimedia GL", SoL 25.00
  • Upcoming releases: Fluxbuntu "Gutsy Gibbon"
  • Donations: KTorrent receives US$400
  • New distributions: Baltix GNU/Linux, Draco GNU/Linux, FrogLinux, pclosBE, TinyME, UW-Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Organize and find files fast with GTKtalog

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you own a large number of CD or DVD media disks, you might have a hard time finding a specific file or folder on one of them -- unless you use GTKtalog. This utility scans every file and folder on your storage media and saves the captured information in a single-file searchable database named CDkatalog.

GConf — GNOME under the hood

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: Gconf is a system built in GNOME 2 which stores applications’ preferable configuration data as well as graphical environment variables in its own files.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos