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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wine (Wine is not an emulator) 1.7.36 Gives Users Control over Speakers Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:20pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.12 KDE Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:16pm
Story 9-Way Linux Laptop Performance Comparison From Intel Nehalem To Broadwell Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Korora 21 available Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:55pm
Story LQ Poll Results Expected and Unexpected Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 7:59pm
Story Can Android One prove successful? Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:47am
Story Mesa 10.4.4 Released Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:06am
Story Can Open-Source Voting Tech Fix The U.S. Elections System? Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:57am
Story Exclusive: Pivotal CEO says open source Hadoop tech is coming Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:52am
Story 4MLinux 11.1 Delivers Maintenance, Miniserver, Multimedia and Mystery Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 8:48am

HP's Mini 1000: Sometimes a Road Warrior Needs a Good Peashooter

Filed under
Hardware

technewsworld.com: Maybe the biggest adjustment one has to make to use a netbook is the physical tininess of the keyboard and touchpad. HP's Mini 1000 makes good use of a small space and delivers a passable keyboard, but the touchpad still puts the buttons off to the side, which is much less comfortable.

Liberation fonts for Linux

blogs.computerworld: I was reminded yesterday that just because I know something, doesn't mean that everyone knows it. This time it was some friends who really didn't like their current fonts in Ubuntu and OpenSolaris respectively. So, I suggested that they try Red Hat's open-source Liberation fonts. To my surprise, it turns out they didn't know about them.

The "Microsofting" of Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: While we love to hammer at proprietary companies like Microsoft for "dumbing down" the interaction for users, it's something of a shock when we realize that some Linux distros are doing the exact same thing.

Another reason to use Linux: Maximum burning speed!

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: For those looking for yet another reason to switch to Linux, I offer you this simple fact. CD's and DVD's burned on Linux tend to be processed faster, are more stable, better quality.

Linux can save your business.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs/locutus: In these hard times I am seeing businesses dropping like flies. Even the big boys are talking about and acting on the laying off of thousands of workers. As always in these sort of situations what is a disaster for some is an opportunity for others. What is one mans pain is another's pleasure so to speak.

Is the Open Standards Alliance Betraying Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com/blogs: Interoperability has always been at the heart of the Open Solutions Alliance. There was, it is true, a slight blurring of the focus, as reflected in the name: Open *Solutions* Alliance, not Open *Source* Alliance.

Migration from Microsoft to Linux - O, the Joy

Filed under
Linux

therantzone.blogspot: So I finally made the plunge. I've long wanted to be part of that geeky elite who broke from the crowd, stepped aside from their fellow computer lemmings and took a different plunge - instead of off the cliff, but into an alien and poorly understood (by the masses) computer operating system - Unix.

LCA2009: That mysterious thing called the kernel

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: For the last four years, the pony-tailed Jonathan Corbet, kernel developer and editor, has presented what he calls the kernel report at Australia's national Linux conference.

Linus Torvalds on regression, laziness and having his code rejected

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: Want to know what happens if you suggest a way to fix Linux that might solve a major difficulty, but also introduce new problems? To quote Linus Torvalds: " I laugh in your face!"

Interview with Daniel Holbach, Ubuntu Community Developer

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

oneopensource.it: Daniel Holbach works for Canonical where is involved in the Ubuntu Community, taking care the relationship with the MOTU team, the Ubuntu developers. Daniel gave us an interview where he speaks about his own work.

Living free with Linux: 2 weeks without Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com: It's one of those perennial age-old battles that can never be resolved. Coke or Pepsi? Chocolate or vanilla? Linux or Windows?

Linux CD Ripping Utilities

Filed under
Software

thelinuxblog.com: CD Ripping with Linux doesn’t have to be the labor intensive task that it once was. No longer do we have the days of writing a hundred character command to rip a CD with the perfect options. Here are some utilities aimed at making your life of ripping your collection of CD’s to a digital format you can actually use.

Calls for open source government

Filed under
OSS

news.bbc.co.uk: The secret to a more secure and cost effective government is through open source technologies and products. The claim comes from Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs): Still Coming Soon?

  • The Case for Open Source Development, a Personal Case Study
  • The Netbook is dead. Long live the notebook!
  • Linux Recording With the MobilePre
  • FLOSS Weekly 52: Casey Reas and Ben Fry on Processing.org
  • The SFLS Episode 0x05: Eben Moglen on Origins of Copyright and Patents
  • Eric Raymond on Hacking, Open Source, and the Cathedral and the Bazaar
  • Comux 000100
  • Auto-launching Programs on Ubuntu Startup
  • Microsoft donates code to Apache Stonehenge project
  • Advantages of IPv6 - The Next Generation Internet
  • Nokia Using Drupal
  • Industrial Linux groups merge
  • Multi-Pointer X Support For GTK+
  • Are you a Linux?
  • about:mozilla Jan 20
  • Back to Gentoo

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Some useful Linux bash tricks

  • Recover Deleted Files Using Linux
  • Making changes to an OpenOffice.org chart in Draw
  • Create a Sound File from a Text File
  • You pushd me again and I will popd you one
  • How To Install And Configure Cairo Dock In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Remotely monitor servers with the Nagios check_by_ssh plugin
  • Using vi to Encrypt Text Files
  • Shared Terminal Sessions over SSH

Open-source chief optimistic about proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The incoming president of an alliance of open-source companies hopes he can persuade big-name proprietary ISVs to join rivals in his group to further interoperability.

"Green" netbook boasts five-hour battery life

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: CherryPal announced an Atom-based "Bing" netbook that runs Linux or Windows XP, and offers a claimed five hours of battery life. The company also announced an upgraded version of its Linux-based nettop, the CherryPal C114, and launched a "Green Maraschino" open-source Linux distribution supporting the Bing.

The Wide Gulf: Techies and Ordinary Users

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I seriously doubt any of my clients will ever be “Linux newbies” for the simple reason too many Linux people assume “newbie” means someone who will become one of the techies.

Open source developers ride the cloud

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Nearly half of developers working on open source projects plan to offer applications as Web services offerings using cloud providers, according to results of an Evans Data open source development survey being released on Tuesday.

DVCS Round-Up: One System to Rule Them All?--Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxfoundation.org: In this review, we will take a look at six different revision control systems. Namely these are git, Mercurial, darcs, Monotone, Bazaar (which is used by the Ubuntu project), and SVK (which is based upon Subversion). All six systems are distributed, and we will take a look at the different workflows supported (or enforced) by them.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Virtual Reality in Mixed Reality, Taskcluster Development

  • Building Bold New Worlds With Virtual Reality
    From rich text to video to podcasts, the Internet era offers an array of new ways for creators to build worlds. Here at Mozilla, we are particularly excited about virtual reality. Imagine moving beyond watching or listening to a story; imagine also feeling that story. Imagine being inside it with your entire mind and body. Now imagine sharing and entering that experience with something as simple as a web URL. That’s the potential before us.
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 3
    This week we’re heads down focusing on adding features in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.
  • New to me: the Taskcluster team
    At this time last year, I had just moved on from Release Engineering to start managing the Sheriffs and the Developer Workflow teams. Shortly after the release of Firefox Quantum, I also inherited the Taskcluster team. The next few months were *ridiculously* busy as I tried to juggle the management responsibilities of three largely disparate groups.
  • Taskcluster migration update: we're finished!
    Over the past few weeks we've hit a few major milestones in our project to migrate all of Firefox's CI and release automation to taskcluster. Firefox 60 and higher are now 100% on taskcluster!

OSS Leftovers

  • After the First US Transaction, Propy Announces an Open Source Developer Program
    California-based blockchain startup Propy, is bringing the commercial use of blockchain technology to the US. After facilitating the first US Blockchain-based real estate deed in Vermont, Propy announced a new open source Developer Program. The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.
  • Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source
    Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads. Titus offers a convenient model for managing compute resources, allows developers to maintain just their application artifacts, and provides a consistent developer experience from a developer’s laptop to production by leveraging Netflix container-focused engineering tools.
  • Netflix's Container Management System Is Now Open Source
    On Thursday Netflix announced it's made its home grown container management system, Titus, open source.
  • Lumina Networks on delivering open source SDN
    What kinds of companies should consider open source SDN, and what are the associated challenges in using such open source deployments? Lumina Networks has unrivalled expertise in working with customers and partners to deliver implementations, and explains its processes and outlines the benefits of using open source SDN.
  • Luxoft launches PELUX 1.0 open source platform for automotive
    Luxoft’s automotive division has launched PELUX 1.0, an open source platform available to developers. This has been developed from its PELUX software suite as used by carmakers and tier 1 suppliers to build converged infotainment, autonomous driving, communication, HMI and car body control systems.
  • Dev Preview: MongoDB Enterprise Running on OpenShift
    In order to compete and get products to market rapidly, enterprises today leverage cloud-ready and cloud-enabled technologies. Platforms as a Service (or PaaS) provide out-of-the-box capabilities which enable application developers to focus on their business logic and users instead of infrastructure and interoperability. This key ability separates successful projects from those which drown themselves in tangential work which never stops. In this blog post, we’ll cover MongoDB’s general PaaS and cloud enablement strategy as well as touch upon some new features of Red Hat’s OpenShift which enable you to run production-ready MongoDB clusters. We’re also excited to announce the developer preview of MongoDB Enterprise Server running on OpenShift. This preview allows you to test out how your applications will interact with MongoDB running on OpenShift.
  • Is Open Source The AI Nirvana for Intel? [Ed: openwashing a malicious company using buzzwords and urban myths]
  • Writing Chuck – Joke As A Service
    Recently I really got interested to learn Go, and to be honest I found it to be a beautiful language. I personally feel that it has that performance boost factor from a static language background and easy prototype and get things done philosophy from dynamic language background. The real inspiration to learn Go was these amazing number of tools written and the ease with which these tools perform although they seem to be quite heavy. One of the good examples is Docker. So I thought I would write some utility for fun, I have been using fortune, this is a Linux utility which gives random quotes from a database. I thought let me write something similar but let me do something with jokes, keeping this mind I was actually searching for what can I do and I landed up on jokes about Chuck Norris or as we say it facts about him. I landed up on chucknorris.io they have an API which can return different jokes about Chuck, and there it was my opportunity to put something up and I chose Go for it.

today's howtos

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning