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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Millions Of Opportunities For GNU/Linux To Take Over Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 7:09pm
Story Network Security Toolkit Is Based on Fedora 20 Using Linux Kernel 3.18.5 Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 6:59pm
Story Node.js is getting its own open-source, independent foundation Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 6:47pm
Story What the Ubuntu phone could mean for open source Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 6:40pm
Story How to Hire Top Linux Talent Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 6:23pm
Story AllSeen Alliance Senior Director Philip DesAutels: The Full Promise of IoT Lies in Open Source Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 5:23pm
Story NHS open source movement gathers pace as Trusts set up CIC Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 5:11pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 12:42pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 12:40pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 12:39pm

Not Linux' Quietest Couple of Weeks

Filed under
Linux

ldn.linuxfoundation.org: Well, I'd have to say that for January, these past few days have certainly been chock full o' Linux news. And not just any news: a big Linux conference, a significant licensing shift for a big-name Linux library, layoffs in Redmond, and--perhaps most earth-shattering of all--Bdale Garbee got his beard shaved off for charity.

Introducing KDE 4 - Kontact: Kmail

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: I can't truly comment on how much it improve, since I didn't use Kontact in KDE 3.5.x, however, what I can say is I'm completely amazed by it. It works well, it has a overall good interface (with some, from my point of view, little mistakes here and there).

Editor's Note: Joe Sixpack Must Die

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: Linux advocacy is caught up in a race to the bottom, and this is understandable, because for those who wish to dethrone Windows, diving to the bottom appears to be the most direct route to the throne. But appearances are deceiving.

Linux pitfall of soft links ln - Rhythm Box - Music Player on Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

watkissonline.co.uk: I came across a strange issue on one of my Ubuntu computers. I had added some more MP3 files to my music folder and so to my surprise I ended up with two of each file in my library on Rhythm Box.

Jolicloud OS for netbooks grows up, gets its own interface

Filed under
Linux

liliputing.com: Jolicloud is an operating system that’s being designed specifically for netbooks. It’s based on Ubuntu Linux, but it’s really designed to provide quick and easy access to internet based applications like Facebook, Gmail, Skype, and Twitter.

3 Hacks for Firefox That Will Double Your Internet Browsing Speed

Filed under
Moz/FF

gnoted.com: There are many people out there complaining about the Firefox RAM Memory Bug. Now a lot of us have found the ’secrets’ on how to manipulate settings in “about:config” to drop the memory usage as long as possible and to increase the speed at which Firefox loads sites.

Combo media box runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Blusens Technologies has announced a combination set-top box, digital video recorder, network-attached storage device, and media server that runs Linux on a Sigma SMP8634 SoC.

Tabbed Browsing for Packages

Filed under
SUSE

lizards.opensuse.org: There are many approaches to managing software packages. Some users like to use command line tools like zypper. Others prefer a GUI tool like the YaST2 package selector. How do you select any of those filter views?

Suse Studio: Linux customization for the masses

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: One of the great promises of software is its infinite malleability: software can be whatever you want, so long as you have the skills necessary (and legal rights) to modify it. I'm therefore hugely impressed by Novell's Suse Studio, an innovative way to enable both standardization and customization of the Linux kernel.

7 differences between Linux and Windows

Filed under
OS

bradshawenterprises.com/blog: Having mainly used various linuxes over the last few years, I’ve returned to using Windows 7 on my main desktop (out of curiosity) and XP on my work laptop (out of the fact it’s not mine!). Thought I’d share somethings I’ve noticed now I’m moving between them daily.

What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3

heise.de: Red Hat has released version 5.3, the third update of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5 operating system, first introduced in March 2007. In addition to various bug fixes, RHEL 5.3 also offers a number of new features and improvements.

LCA2009: The third wave of open source

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: Open source has reached the third wave of its evolution and those who have been using the older models which were procurement-driven need to adapt.

Top 50 Linux Alternatives to Popular Apps

Filed under
Software

laptoplogic.com: Linux is quickly gaining popularity, but there are still many users afraid to convert as they are not familiar with the applications. Today our Linux guru Blair Mathis is back to introduce fifty of the most popular applications on this OS.

Seven newbie tips for installing Linux apps

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.computerworld: After I wrote in my article, Living free with Linux: 2 weeks without Windows, about the trouble I had with installing and updating Linux applications, I received literally hundreds of helpful responses offering me advice on how to handle things better. Here are seven top tips.

Why Ubuntu Needs Hardware Compatibility Testing

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxloop.com: Something few people seem to realize when they “compare” Windows and Ubuntu is that they are using a computer that was designed and built for Windows, not Ubuntu.

Fedora video bonanza

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: The great thing about the Fedora community is that when there’s work to be done, people roll up their sleeves and pitch in.

A Great Time for the Gates Foundation to Embrace Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: This is a great time for the Gates Foundation to embrace Linux, bringing the value of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) to people who might otherwise not hear of the value of Free and Open Source Software.

Goodbye Vincent, welcome back Oden!

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: After nearly 9 years, Vincent Danen will be leaving Mandriva at the end of this month. This departure will not leave empty chair, oden Eriksson will be in charge of security team.

Friday funnies for fun and groans

Filed under
Humor

toolbox.com/blogs: These will either make you laugh or groan. They are original and come straight from my twisted mind.

Amarok2 and redefinition of awesomeness

Filed under
Software

gnufied.org: I used to be a KDE user and devoted Amarok user. Even when fancy took me to run Gnome, I used to run Amarok faithfully. Nothing unique, many Gnome users do the same. Amarok2 has been criticised and critics attacked fittingly.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more