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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Crontab Configuration, OpenSUSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

At some point several years ago, SUSE and Redhat migrated to new multi-file and sub-directory approaches (search anacron) for their system crontabs. A helpful comment posted to my 2 March entry motivated me to learn how these are set up. Here’s how openSUSE 10.2 structures its cron configuration and provides the means of controlling it:

* YaST, System, sysconfig editor, cron - edits various configuration parameters stored in the /etc/sysconfig/cron file (this file can also be edited directly).
* YaST, System, System Services - turn the cron service on/off here.

Join the KDE Event Coordination Task Force now!

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KDE

KDE is visiting a lot of events on a yearly basis. In most cases, the booth is staffed by volunteers. A successful event attendance depends on a number of factors, if those aren't considered, it might end in frustrated, or even burnt out contributors. But getting it right is not just about "went good / bad", there are various shades of grey. Having a look at past events, the most important factors seem to be in two groups, general considerations and planning and per-event planning.

Zabbix: State-of-the-art network monitoring

Filed under
Software

I have used BigBrother and Nagios for a long time to troubleshoot network problems, and I was happy with them -- until Zabbix came along. Zabbix is an enterprise-class open source distributed monitoring solution for servers, network services, and network devices. It's easier to use and provides more functionality than Nagios or BigBrother.

Freeing an old game - Relicensing UMoria

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Gaming

People are often attracted to games before they are attracted to the free software movement. This means that many free software enthusiasts are addicted to non-free games. This is what turns some people to free software—the inability to see how a game works, or the inability to legally share it with friends.

Writing shell scripts which execute locally or remotely

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HowTos

There are a lot of times when it is useful to have a single shell script run both upon the local host, and also upon remote hosts. Here we'll show a simple trick which allows you to accomplish this easily.

To execute shell scripts remotely the most obvious approach is to copy it there, with scp, and then use ssh to actually execute it. This is similar to running simple commands remotely using ssh directly:

skx@mine:~$ ssh yours uptime
07:12:25 up 3 days, 18:15, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.08
skx@mine:~$

With that in mind the solution becomes:

Network File System (NFS) Server and Client Configuration in Debian

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HowTos

NFS was developed at a time when we weren’t able to share our drives like we are able to today - in the Windows environment. It offers the ability to share the hard disk space of a big server with many smaller clients. Again, this is a client/server environment. While this seems like a standard service to offer, it was not always like this. In the past, clients and servers were unable to share their disk space.

Why Dell Is Really Saying No to Linux

By now, many of you may be wondering why Dell is passing up such a great niche market by not offering Linux as an alternative OS option to Windows. We have talked about how this would only prove to benefit a company like Dell, but we have also acknowledged the fact that it will likely never happen.

OpenOffice.org Issues an Invitation to Dell Computer Corporation

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OOo

OpenOffice.org urges Dell's CEO to respond to customer demand and bundle
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/add/story
OpenOffice.org's free software alternative to Microsoft Office with Dell's computers

One laptop per child

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Hardware

For some time, I've been aware of online discussions going on about an innovative project to build cheap laptop computers to be given to kids in developing countries.

The goal was to build a sub-$100 (about R740) laptop computer which could not only be used by children to learn computing skills, but to assist them with completing their other schoolwork as well.

I reserved judgement on the idea but it now seems as if it really is going to fly, with numbers of test machines having been delivered to communities around the world and large scale production due to start later in the year.

Book Review: IPCOP Firewalls - Closing borders with Open Source

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Reviews

IPCop is a GPLed firewall solution targeted at Small Office/Home Office network. It is favored by many for its ease of configuration and setup and its support for a variety of features that you would expect to have in a modern firewall. IPCop is famed for letting users setup a sophisticated firewall for ones network without ever having to write an iptables rule themselves.

Are you an open source user or joiner?

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OSS

In my previous column, I touched on the issue of what constitutes an open-source vendor. Ask Andy Astor that question, and his answer is a shrug. "Honestly," he says, "who cares?" To Astor, there are really two broad categories of companies with respect to their relationship to open-source code. Some are users. Others are joiners.

An open letter: from a consumer to the distributions

Filed under
Linux

My name is Adam Posey, I'm a resident of Elkins, West Virginia and a GNU/Linux user. I do not run a server nor I do not own a business. What I do have is considerable influence over the buying decisions of other people around me because I am knowledgeable in technology. I have grown very weary of the current state of Linux for the home user.

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

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Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

An Update On Server/Site Move

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Site News

Well, I guess we'll go with this debian install. I still haven't worked out all the kinks yet cuz my gran'babies came over today and I didn't get a chance to work on things. I took the opportunity to upgrade drupal as you may have noticed too, and it was a much easier upgrade this time.

Linux Mint: Taking Ubuntu to the Next Level

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Reviews
Ubuntu

For the last several years, Ubuntu has been providing a superb desktop operating system consisting of open-source software. It has done a great job, but the philosophy behind Ubuntu prevents proprietary software from being included out of the box. This is where Linux Mint comes in.

Home networking Linux and Windows

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Linux

Lately I've been working on enabling network shares on most of the systems that run in my house. They're the various computers that have shown up over the years and are now parked in corners of rooms around my house. With the exception of the iMac and europa, every one came with Windows pre-installed. If they run Linux, it was installed well after the fact.

Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care

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OSS

My first planel for South by Southwest was titled, "Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care." Four advocates discussed the reasons for using open source. Pleasantly, there was almost no Microsoft-bashing, and only a little discussion of using open source because it's socially the right thing to do.

Open source can be very `benefit-driven'

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Interviews
OSS

Over the last five years, the IT community has seen a consuming increase in the usage of open-source technologies and acknowledged the role Sun Microsystems played in the process. eWorld spoke to Matt Thomson of Sun Microsystems Inc at Sun Tech Days.

Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop. Part 1: Switching is hard

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, I’ve found that the saying “it just works” is about as useful as saying that airplanes “just fly.” It’s an easy thing to say until you have to learn to pilot one. Foreign languages also “just work.” But have you ever tried to learn one?

Linux is like that.

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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more