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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop. Part 1: Switching is hard

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, I’ve found that the saying “it just works” is about as useful as saying that airplanes “just fly.” It’s an easy thing to say until you have to learn to pilot one. Foreign languages also “just work.” But have you ever tried to learn one?

Linux is like that.

bash ninja - everyday commands for the commandline

Filed under
HowTos

When using the terminal, there are a lot of tricks and shortcuts that can make using the terminal much more efficient and pleasurable. I'll list here some of the key ones that I use.

Review of Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

There's a lot of exciting things going on in the world of Linux distros and while browsing for alternatives to (K)Ubuntu I stumbled across PCLinuxOS. While discussing my new found love for PCLOS I decided that I shouldn't forget the distro that seems to have started it all - Ubuntu!

How To Use Jigdo For Incremental CD Updates (Daily Builds)

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HowTos

Jigdo is really nice for rebuilding daily CD images without downloading the entire CD again, which can waste bandwidth and time when the latest daily build may have only updated a handful of packages. Here is what you’ll need to setup and use Jigdo.

Why Ubuntu isn’t mainstream yet

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve been using Fedora for about 8-9 months at work and have recently moved from XP to Ubuntu on my home machine as well. My reason was that to check out something new (and free) before I decide to dish out cash for Vista and a system upgrade (although I’d prefer to buy a Vista Ready laptop and keep my desktop as it is). I’d heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu and wanted to give Linux a second chance (after nightmares at work with Fedora Core 3).

The Power of Linux Console

Filed under
HowTos

A console (terminal, terminal emulation) and a shell are equivalent to what is commonly known in Windows as the ‘command line’. For many it’s just a mysterious and unnecessary system tool, reserved only for the ‘1337′.

Freespire 2.0 Alpha 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

With the switch to an Ubuntu base, development of Freespire 2.0 has restarted. The first alpha release of Freespire 2.0 is now available for download and we had decided to check it out for ourselves.

Setting Up A DNS Server On Ubuntu Edgy With MyDNS And MyDNSConfig

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS and MyDNSConfig. MyDNS is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns.

Cracking Open the Door to Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

When Bill Hilf came from IBM Corp. to join Microsoft three years ago, the company's stance on open source vacillated wildly. It would swing from outright indifference to overt nastiness. Today, something else is unfolding: Microsoft is striking a surprising balance. It has stopped dismissing open source licensing and community development as dangerous folly or evil foe, and is looking for a way to both compete and co-exist.

Should Google acquire Open Office?

Filed under
Google

I think there could be a lot of benefits to both parties if Open Office were to work along side the Google Docs team. Now I’m not talking about Google buying Open Office; instead I’m talking about Google hiring some programmers to work on the Open Office application and help integrate the two. I know this is going to cause some controversy, but just hear me out.

Former Mass. CIO feels 'bittersweet pride' after battles with Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

As CIO of Massachusetts from February to November last year, Louis Gutierrez had to endure most of the brunt of Microsoft Corp.'s political wrath over a state policy calling for the adoption of the Open Document Format for Office Applications, or ODF.

The Ultimate Time Waster

Filed under
Gaming

Today I have for you something guaranteed to lower your productivity: Wesnoth. This game is one of those free software apps that is of the quality of a proprietary application. Wesnoth is essentially a MO-RTS (multiplayer online real-time strategy) game. It offers two modes: campaign and multiplayer.

Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5+ - Updating experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

I'm writing about how Ubuntu handled an automatic update the week of March 5, 2007. These days the process of keeping your system up to date has evolved considerably so that it is very easy to stay current with fixes and security updates. Upgrading is not always straight forward.

Review: Elive 0.6.5

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Enlightenment. Linux users who have been around for awhile no doubt remember this X11 window manager. Every once in awhile a new story pops up on the web about Enlightenment and I reminisce about using it back when few people had heard of Linux. So, with the latest Elive release announcement, I decided to give Elive a try.

creating a new SE Linux policy module

Filed under
HowTos

Creating a simple SE Linux policy module is not difficult. For example I had a server with the above messages in the kernel message log from the spf-policy program (run from Postfix) trying to run the "hostnme" program. So I ran the following command to generate a .te file (SE Linux policy source):

In The Eyes Of GIMP 2.3.15

Filed under
Software

The GIMP is a project that whenever a new release comes out (stable or not), I can't help but to give it a shot. With the release of GIMP 2.3.15 it made its way onto one of my machines.

Paranormal Search Engine Powered by Linux and Open Source

Filed under
Web

The Anomalies Network has unveiled the UFOCrawler, one of the first of a new breed of search engines specifically tuned to search for information about the paranormal and unexplained. The Anomalies Network uses the CentOS Linux distribution, Apache, Tomcat, MySQL and PHP in addition to IBM OmniFind Yahoo! Edition.

How to flash motherboard BIOS from Linux

Filed under
HowTos

You've finally made the move to a Windows-free computer, you're enjoying your brand new Linux OS, no trojans/viruses, no slowdown, everything's perfect. Suddenly, you need to update the BIOS on your motherboard to support some new piece of hardware, but typically the motherboard vendor is offering only DOS based BIOS flash utilities. You panic! Fortunately, this problem is easy to solve...

KSpread vs. OpenOffice.org Calc

Filed under
KDE
OOo

I've been using OpenOffice.org Calc for a while now, but I recently decided to give KSpread a try after getting frustrated with Calc's slow load times. It rarely bothered me on my desktop system because I have 4GB of RAM and usually leave the program open, but my work laptop runs Windows XP, forcing me to run Kubuntu in a virtual machine.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • The Begining
    The friendship/relationship with the awesome community of GNOME begins. What followed after 2 commits into the main branch, one application submission, and the result was the start of the most amazing few months. These months have been a humbling experience, the biggest learning experience, and the most productive time.
  • GTK+ Tester Window?
    For an internal application, I’ve created a Gtk.Window derived tester class, added some widgets to show current test, status, number of fails and a Gtk.Grid to attach custom widgets. This class expose some API to set a widget to test, autoclose and some signals you can use to run some tests.
  • GUADEC 2016
    A lot of great things happened – as always GUADEC with it’s perfect size got me to speak to a hell lot of new and interesting people. Thank you all for being there – it was a pleasure.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • #MyOpenHA Part 1 -Philosophy
    Home Automation. The holy hipster and geek grail. I have played with it. I have tried. I have failed. But today I am proud to have a solution I can truly endorse. So join me on this journey. This series will explain my solution, in excruciating detail. In the hope that I can learn from you while I am explaining. This series will be filled over time with more and more articles. But now, let’s talk about philosophy. The Why. Soon you will see the What and How. One promise, or the TL;DR: It is all 100% Open Source. Well, almost. I have integrated some quite non-open things but always in an Open Source Way.
  • Disable the new Firefox 48 location bar - Tutorial
    Here we are. Seven minutes later, our life is bearable again, but not perfect. Thank you Mozilla, thank you very much. This is exactly what I needed to enrich my life. After all, we all know, cosmetic changes are good, because that's what plants crave. Stop with these idiotic tweaks please. No one cares. It won't make the browser better. It won't change the market share. It will not attract idiots, as idiots are happy. It will only alienate diehard users who keep on using your browser because they have no alternative. From a loved favorite to the least of evils choice. That's what Firefox has become.
  • What’s Happening in OpenStack-Ansible (WHOA) – August 2016
    My goal with these posts is to inform more people about what we’re doing in the OpenStack-Ansible community and bring on more contributors to the project.
  • PowerShell on Linux? No, Thank You [comic]
  • LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)
    There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures. AAP is designed for FPGA usage and there is an open-source soft-core with commercial deployments also being available. AAP is short for the Altruistic Processor and is described in technical detail here. AAP is said to be an original design but inspired by the OpenRISC / RISC-V projects.
  • UK-French Data Taskforce publishes joint report
    "Invest in and share experiences building core data registers, learning from the French National Address Database experience”; “develop initiatives to bring basic data literacy into primary and secondary education”; and “commission research into algorithmic transparency and accountability” are among the recommendations listed in a report published in July by the joint French-UK Data Taskforce.
  • Tuscany: how to promote the economy of sharing and collaboration
    In June, the region of Tuscany (Italy), in collaboration with Open Toscana and ANCI Toscana, launched a project, the goal of which is to “build a regional policy on the economy of sharing and collaboration”.
  • MS Tries But Just Doesn’t Get FLOSS
    This is what drove me to GNU/Linux so many years ago.
  • Microsoft's maps lost Melbourne because it used bad Wikipedia data
    Microsoft has laid part of the blame for Bing Maps' mis-location of the Australian city of Melbourne by a whole hemisphere on Wikipedia. Yes, Wikipedia, “the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit.” Microsoft made its admission after your correspondent took to Twitter on Monday to do what we in publishing call “pimping"the story of Melbourne's mis-placement. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, noticed that pimping and responded as follows.
  • Northern Ireland promotes Open Data in education
    The Northern Ireland Department of Finance has supported a challenge that encourages the re-use of public Open Data in education. Called the OpenDataNI Challenge – Using Open Data for Education” (ODNI4EDU), this project, officially launched on June 14, intends to award two applications or educational tools and resources that make use of at least one dataset published on the portal OpendataNI.
  • Try this handy tool to convert a Web site into a native app with Electron
  • Introducing CloudiumOS [Ed: built on Electron]
    It is a complete multi platform operating system that allows you to manage your documents, access your media files and collaborate with other people on the go. CloudiumOS can work side-by-side with another operating system (either via a VM, a Desktop app or Mobile App) or as a standalone installation.

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers