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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story IRS Thwarts OSS, Classic Quake, and KDE Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 6:16am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 5:47am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:42pm
Story CyanogenMod users may not see Android L anytime soon Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:19pm
Story VLC for Android available on Google Play Store Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:15pm
Story LG is the first smartphone maker to join Google's Open Automotive Alliance Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:12pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10 Will Not Ship With Open-Source OpenCL Support Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:11pm
Story Chumby back from the dead with 1,000 apps Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:30pm
Story kGraft Being Discussed For Inclusion Into Linux-Next Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:23pm

Mozilla makes Firefox 3.0 bug-fix decision

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. decided today to roll out a second release candidate for Firefox 3.0 that will include fixes for about 40 bugs. The alternative was to declare the open-source browser good "as is," then patch the problems with a later update.

Also: Mozilla Developer News May 27

Why the pre-loaded Linux Desktop is important

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

practical-tech.com: I will never cease to be amazed at how fast things change and how quickly people forget. Today’s example is a Slashdot posting with the title, “Why Buy a PC Preloaded with Linux?” Specifically, the dotter—slasher really doesn’t give the right tone—wants to know “‘Why should I buy a PC preloaded with Linux?’

RIP, Levanta

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: It seemed like such a great idea. Linux is moving from edge and departmental servers to the data center, so why not offer Linux data center automation, complete with virtualization Linux lifecycle management? Well, maybe it's still a great business idea, but Levanta wasn't able to make a go of it.

Penny Arcade: Linux Screenshots

Filed under
Gaming

polishlinux.org: Hothead Games together with Penny Arcade released a very interesting game called “Penny Arcade Adventures: On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness”. It can be purchased at $20 in Greenhouse Internet store, which is a counterpart of more known Steam Games. Nothing peculiar, you say? And you’d be right if not for one small detail: the game is available also for GNU/Linux.

LinuxWorld Expo to Offer Installfest for Needy Schools

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: As the LinuxWorld Expo conference, slated for August 4th to 7th in San Francisco, starts to take shape, more news is emerging about events to happen there. At LinuxWorld, Untangle is organizing an Installfest event to donate open source (Ubuntu) computers to schools in need of technology resources.

30 Similarities between PowerPoint and Impress

Filed under
OOo

fanaticattack.com: This article is to emphasize the similarities between the OpenOffice.org Impress and Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation tools. These are the things you can instantly do with no relearning. I hope that not only will this show some of the similarities but will show you some shortcuts you might not have known about in either program.

Multiple live CDs in one DVD

Filed under
Software

share4vn.com: Live CDs do a great job of advertising Linux distributions. In addition to general-purpose live CD distributions, there are lots of task-oriented live CDs. Wouldn’t it be great if you could carry multiple live CDs on one DVD disc?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Secure and anonymous browsing with Firefox and TorK

  • Bash Regular Expressions
  • Using Perl On Linux To Do Mass Synchronization Of File Time Stamps
  • How to use the easiest Linux version
  • Edit and compare giant binary files with lfhex
  • Conky: A Quick Guide
  • Using your 3G/CDMA plug-and-play usb modems for mobile broadband
  • How to Lock Down GNOME
  • Tip: Sound in Tremulous under Ubuntu PulseAudio
  • Blogging with Movable Type 4.1
  • How To Downgrade To Firefox 2 In Ubuntu Hardy
  • Building a New Computer - Part 2: Putting it Together

KDE 4.1 Beta1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Project is proud to announce the first beta release of KDE 4.1. Beta 1 is aimed at testers, community members and enthusiasts in order to identify bugs and regressions, so that 4.1 can fully replace KDE 3 for end users.

Novell hopping with news, but it’s not all good

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.techtarget.com: Recently, Novell Inc. has been the beneficiary of generally good news. First, Microsoft gave Novell the nod to write open source extensions to its new System Center, which signals Microsoft’s move toward greater interoperability. This will benefit all open source vendors, but Novell in particular, because these extensions are built on Novell’s ZENworks management software. Score one for Novell.

your rough guide to plasma

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: So I've chosen to become Shane's Personal Plasma Steward. This in turn makes me much more aware of things, that I personally take for granted which aren't so natural (yet) to others. One of those things is "How does this thing work?" (for "plasma" as value of thing). Let me explain on a high level how you can use Plasma and make the most of it, starting with a default Plasma desktop.

Sweeten your Vim with Cream

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: It’s an eternal debate amongst Penguinistas: Emacs or Vim? Unfortunately, for most” normal” (i.e., non-geek) folks, this debate will never occur, since they will find Emacs or Vim way too complicated, strange, and, well… different. There has to be some way to ease users into Vim, some way to leverage the power of Vim while accommodating, or even overcoming, the steep learning curve. Fortunately, there is a solution: Cream.

The Power of SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 - A Must Have Utility Disc

Filed under
Linux

reviewlinux.com: SystemRescueCD has been around for sometime and their latest version 1.0.3 just came out today. I take a short look at it and briefly describe some of its advantages. Checkout the short flash video at the end of the article to see SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 in action.

The Anatomy of a Crappy Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: All Linux distributions are not created equal. Some are superior in quality while others are so full of crap. I hate to sound grumpy like Béranger, but I have tried plenty of distros my entire life and have experienced using those that made my blood boil.

Why Linux Frightens Both the Software and Hardware Industry

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Today's closed source software vendors have a very neat, tidy arrangement that works well for them on both the Windows and OS X platforms. I will be exploring why I believe that the software and hardware industries fear widespread Linux adoption and what they will eventually have to do about it should things with desktop Linux come into fruition.

Rock out on Linux with the Banshee 1.0 beta 2 media player

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: It has been almost a year since we got our first glimpse of the next-generation Banshee media player. The latest beta, which was released on Friday, offers a wide variety of impressive features and a highly polished user interface.

20 killer apps for ubuntu linux

Filed under
Software

mcphersonz.wordpress: An operating system is only as good as the application that it can run. Lack of options is definitely not a problem with Ubuntu (or most flavors of Linux for that matter). The problem you are faced with is what to use — looking at my Ubuntu software repositories, I see over 24,000 packages. That’s a lot to choose from.

The Exherbo brouhaha

Filed under
Gentoo

kmandla.wordpress: Don’t fault yourself as clueless just because you haven’t heard about the Exherbo yet. The distro-to-be seems to have gotten some attention for making it clear that your help is not needed, thank you very much.

CSIR to switch 2300 users to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: Parastal CSIR, South Africa’s national science and technology research organisation, is readying to switch most of its more than 2300 staff to using Ubuntu Linux as their default desktop.

Via laptop goes Open Source

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: BUILDING YOU OWN computer has gone beyond nailing a few off-the-shelf components together and overclocking the RAM with the announcement that Via will be offering CAD files of its Openbook laptop to anyone who's interested.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.