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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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I didn't know you could do that in Linux!

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Here are 12 tips, tricks, tweaks and techniques to make you say "I didn't know you could do that in Linux." Sure, not every one may be your cup of tea but here are 12 items to help you have the most positive Linux experience you can.

11 Prime Features of openSUSE 11.1 - A Comprehensive Review

Filed under
SUSE

blog.taragana: Open Suse is coming out with their new version of 11.1 and we are at it. openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 is just released, while the official launch of the final version is on 18 December, 2008. We took a detailed look into openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 and here are the gems we found.

Early Look at Firefox's Private Browsing Mode

Filed under
Moz/FF

lifehacker.com: Firefox users have long had the capability to surf the web without leaving any cookies, URL history, or other identifying marks, given add-ons like Stealther and many others. In the next upgrade to the open-source browser, 3.1, the browser itself will offer a "Private Browsing" mode for anything you don't want shown to anyone else on your system—you know, like gift ideas!

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop (NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I am using an NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.

9 Reasons why I found Ubuntu 8.10 disappointing

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.friendster.com: I installed Ubuntu 8.10 64-bit edition. And now I regret it. here’s something seriously wrong with my wireless driver. PulseAudio is more broken than before!

openSUSE 11.1's New Partitioning Module

Filed under
SUSE

ostatic.com: openSUSE 11.1 is moving ever closer to its December release date. One of the changes long time openSUSE users will notice right away is the new YaST disk partitioner.

ASRock G43Twins-FullHD

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Hardware

phoronix.com: One of the motherboards to use Intel's G43 is the ASRock G43Twins-FullHD, which we happen to be looking at today. This motherboard that pairs the Intel G43 with an ICH10 Southbridge supports both DDR2 and DDR3 system memory and its video connectors include D-Sub, DVI-D, and DisplayPort.

Dillo 2.0 is fast, but limited

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The lightweight Dillo Web browser, in development for eight years, has always been a contender for the fastest browser available on GNU/Linux -- so much so that the Google's Chrome will have to be pretty nimble to outpace it. With last month's release of version 2.0, Dillo is faster than ever.

Review: CentOS 5.2

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: This month’s Linux Format Magazine came with CentOS 5.2 on the disc. CentOS, in case you don’t know, is a community supported version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. (RHEL) Again, in the unlikely case you don’t know - Red Hat is required to supply the source code to all GPL code it uses in RHEL. What they don’t have to do is supply the Source RPMs which make it extremely easy for a distro like CentOS to exist.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian discord over de-classified developer proposal

  • trunk/kdelibs/plasma/
  • Xandros Announces Broad Series of Cross-Platform Management Packs (PR)
  • Don't Fear Big-Box Linux Development
  • Mozilla Developer News Nov 04
  • Fedora 10 Linux previewed
  • Qt Creator, KDevelop
  • OpenSolaris Constitution: Updating v2
  • Ubuntu and Your Money
  • And people actually pay for this stuff?
  • Goodbye My Friend
  • Fl_TeacherTool: Award-winning software with an uncertain future
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Not End of Capitalism
  • If Windows is a dead end, what's next?
  • What Linux Needs To Win on Desktops

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Keep Track of Your Time with Hamster Applet

  • Super Grub Disk To The Rescue
  • List Open Files
  • Using dnsmasq for DNS and DHCP services
  • Recover Deleted Files From Your Linux System
  • Folding@Home on Ubuntu
  • conquer your file associations in kde
  • Recover grub bootloader with Vista, Xp and Linux
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux

Diebold faces GPL infringement lawsuit over voting machines

Filed under
OSS
Legal

arstechnica.com: Artifex Software, the company behind the open source Ghostscript PDF processing software, has filed a lawsuit against voting machine vendor Diebold and its subsidiary Premier Election Solutions. Artifex says that Diebold violated the GPL by incorporating Ghostscript into commercial electronic voting machine systems.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 beta boosts virtualization capabilities

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat Inc.has introduced the beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.3, which includes improvements in virtualization, clustering and file systems, along with support for the latest hardware drivers.

Funtoo: Metro 1.1 Released

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: I’ve just released version 1.1 of Metro and updated the QuickStart Guide to reflect this new version.

TV-B-Gone: Not Your Average Open Source Success Story

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: There is an interesting story regarding open source hardware making the rounds today. Have you ever heard of TV-B-Gone?

Beta 3 of Amarok 2.0 released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: The Amarok team announces the third beta release of Amarok 2.0, codename Ataksak. It includes a database importer for users of Amarok 1.4, who want to keep their statistics and ratings, as well as a lot of bugfixes and improvements.

Mandriva appoints Hervé Yahi as Chairman – Chief Executive Officer

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com (PR): Mandriva, the leading European Linux publisher, today announced the appointment of Hervé Yahi as Chairman – CEO.

Linux Desktop Education Deployments Planned in 29 US States

Filed under
Linux

linuxpr.com (PR): Omni and Userful today announced that over 50 academic institutions from 29 US States and 10 countries worldwide have signed up to deploy Multi-station SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktops through the "Free the Penguins" education initiative.

GNUveau Networks builds solar-powered Linux computer networks

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Scott Johnson of GNUveau Networks has developed a solar-powered Internet "hub" system (running Ubuntu GNU/Linux) that he builds to order in his Daytona Beach, Florida, home. His objective is to bring computers and the Internet to places that have no connectivity, no phone service, and no electricity.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 277

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: An overview of Ubuntu editions

  • News: Fedora unveils Plymouth, Sugar spin, Sabayon hints at major new features, Yellow Dog launches beta testing, NetBSD prepares to branch 5.0, CrossOver Linux
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10 Preview, Ubuntu 9.04 release schedule
  • Donations: GoblinX receives US$250
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

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More in Tux Machines

Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone - With Android

I ever so slightly regret the "upgrade" to Android. With a version less than the tablet, the UI changes are extremely noticeable, and the transition isn't as smooth. The device lags, and it just doesn't have enough processing power to give the necessary feel of goodness and elegance. On the other hand, you get tons of native applications that you can actually use, as opposed to the Ubuntu Touch idea. Shame really. For 'tis a compromise. If you ask me, I wholeheartedly embrace the M10 tablet upgrade, but on the phone, you might as well keep Ubuntu unless you need the device for serious use. If it's just an opportunistic call/SMS thing for when abroad and such, or to loan to friends, the original combo is adequate. If you need apps, then Android is the way to go, but do not except any miracles. It won't be speedy, and it won't be too pretty. All in all, an okay player. It is silly attaching sentiments to software or hardware, but I do guess I will fondly remember the Ubuntu phone attempt as a noble idea to make something great and fun. I could have kept the device in its original state, perhaps, but in the end, it would have ended in a pile of ancient stuff you keep around for a decade until you decide you need to throw it away to leave room for fresh memories and less ancient stuff. Having a flawless Android experience would have helped soften the edge, but as it is, it remains the bittersweet attempt at what could have been a revolution. The end. Read more Also: Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – February 23, 2018

​Docker and Red Hat News

  • ​Docker has a business plan headache
    We love containers. And, for most of us, containers means Docker. As RightScale observed in its RightScale 2018 State of the Cloud report, Docker's adoption by the industry has increased to 49 percent from 35 percent in 2017.
  • Mycroft Widget, Atos and Red Hat's New Cloud Container Solution, npm Bug and More
    Atos and Red Hat announced this morning "a new fully-managed cloud container solution - Atos Managed OpenShift (AMOS) - built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform". The press release adds, "Because AMOS is built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a container-centric hybrid cloud solution, it can deliver the flexibility customers seek from cloud-native and container-based applications."
  • Red Hat Decision Manager 7 Boosts BPM with Low-Code Approach
    Red Hat is perhaps best known for its Enterprise Linux platform, but it has been a player in the Business Process Management (BPM) suite for over a decade too. On Feb. 21, Red Hat Decision Manager 7 was officially announced as the successor to the company's JBoss Business Rules Management System (BRMS) product. Red Hat first released BRMS back in May 2009 which itself was an evolution of the JBoss Rules Engine.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Active Stock Evaluation

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.