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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Heart of Linux - part 2 srlinuxx 29/05/2011 - 3:19am
Story Five cool KDE widgets for your desktop srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 9:23pm
Story Why Linux cleanup utilities are dangerous srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 9:21pm
Story Canonical and Ubuntu Needs to Settle Down srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 9:20pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 177 is out srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 9:18pm
Story SimplyMEPIS 11 - My First Experience with MEPIS, Ever srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 6:01pm
Story The Lubuntu 10.04 Experiment srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 5:58pm
Story Intel Sandy Bridge On Fedora 15 Is Decent srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 5:54pm
Story Get a Sneak Peek of Firefox 6 srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 5:51pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/05/2011 - 4:01pm

kubuntu vs MS ISA Proxy ft apt-get

Getting adept at updates behind enemy lines, a quick guide to get your updates running through MS ISA Proxy. Also known as NTLMAPS to the rescue!

Pardus gives Linux a custom lift

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Apart from a KDE desktop and applications, the developers of the Pardus 2007 Linux distribution have built an entire distribution from scratch. Pardus, released last month, has its own multilingual installer, custom dependency-resolving package manager, and an INIT system that slashes boot times by several seconds. The distribution has come a long way since its first release in 2005, when it was based on Gentoo and lacked a package manager. Thanks to its custom tools, it's one of the easiest Linux distribution to run and manage.

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system.

Linux For The Desktop - Is It Really Time?

Filed under
Linux

Linux for the Desktop is still way to geeky for the average user. I guess my best analogy is to compare Linux to DOS. Linux still seems that way to me and this needs to be modified, changed, simplified, redone, uncomplex, uncomplicated, plain, clear, ………that’s enough.

Also: 2007, the Year of the Penguin

Dunc-Tank: Success or failure?

Filed under
Interviews

The Dunc-Tank project has been the topic of much debate in the Debian community since it was launched in September last year. It has now been more than a month since the scheduled release of Debian 4.0, codenamed etch. However, even with Dunc-Tank's funding, etch is yet to be seen.

Red Hat is under siege

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat is under siege. When Oracle launched a direct attack on Red Hat's business model last October, Red Hat's share price sank by 24 per cent. And this week it added management tools to its Linux support service. Now, it's not alone: Sun has thrown Solaris into the mix.

What is this vigr program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

Here you are spending a few pleasant moments running a critical eye over your directory system when you are suddenly quite alarmed. Staring you accusingly in the face is a program thingy called "vigr". Oh No! You think.

Installing Zimbra on Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
HowTos

Zimbra is an open source email server. It does email, calendar, contacts, and various other useful things that software like Microsoft Exchange does. The problem is that Zimbra has a number of dependencies on other open source projects and they don't provide direct downloads for those dependencies.

Setting Up A News-Voting Website With Pligg

Filed under
Web
HowTos

This article shows how to set up your own news-voting website with Pligg. Pligg is a content-management system published under the Affero General Public License, and it is written in PHP and uses a MySQL database for storing its data. With a little work you can create your own community and let users vote news to the front page.

Interview with Dr Andrew S Tanenbaum

Filed under
Interviews

Creator of MINIX, flame-war legend and well known supporter of microkernels -- these are some of the monikers of Dr Andrew S Tanenbaum; he probably wrote a textbook or two that is in your library as well. Builder AU's Nick Gibson caught up with Dr Tanenbaum after his keynote address at linux.conf.au and spoke about microkernels, MINIX and what's coming up on the horizon.

Portrait: Rosegarden's D. Michael McIntyre

Filed under
Interviews

If there is anything like a "typical" member of the free/open source community, that template is probably nothing like D. Michael McIntyre. By profession a truck driver, McIntyre holds a bachelor's degree in Foreign Languages, and he's used his facility with words to document the popular Rosegarden project. He's since gone on to do whatever he sees that needs to be done on the project, and has become an integral part of the Rosegarden team.

Book review: The Definitive Guide to GCC

Filed under
Reviews

Without the GNU Compiler collection GCC it would be difficult to imagine that free software would have had such a rapid penetration into the market place. If you want to use GCC (including version 4) to its utmost, The Definitive Guide to GCC, Second Edition, written by William von Hagen and published by Apress, is almost certainly for you.

Debugging system freezes

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes your Debian box hangs, and for a strange reason, there is no debugging information printed on your screen. What options do you have?

Create virtual Machines Using Virtualbox in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware. Targeted at server, desktop and embedded use, it is now the only professional-quality virtualization solution that is also Open Source Software.

Change Prompt Color when logged in as Root

Filed under
HowTos

All security books will recommend you not to allow root SSH logins to your Linux machines. In this article, I will show you how to change the color of your prompt when you escalate your privileges to a super-user. This technique is a good way to remind yourself that you are holding high privileges.

Animated boot screen on openSuSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

Everyone who has used openSuSE 10.2 must have come across the animated boot screen. But the problem is that its not permanent. It comes sometimes, and doesnt come at other times. Im writing this tutorial for all you penguin lovers who would like to see the animated boot everytime!

GPL 3: An Open-Source Earthquake?

Filed under
OSS

For 15 years, the current version of the GNU General Public License (GPL) has remained untouched. One of the oldest, most widely used open-source licenses, the GPL is a foundational text and an ideological marker. Yet this spring, the GPL's author will release a controversial new version of the license, a move that's already sending tremors along the software industry's fault lines.

Mandriva Linux Opens Office in Lagos

Filed under
MDV

As part of its commitment to help bridge the digital divide and make ICT affordable and closer to the people of West Africa, Mandriva Linux has incorporated a subsidiary with headquarters in Lagos.

Open Source Pioneer Alan Dechert To Deliver Keynote at Red Hat Summit

Filed under
Linux

Alan Dechert, one of the pioneers in the open source software movement, will deliver the keynote speech at the Red Hat Summit.

PCLinuxOS Tops DistroWatch Page Hit Ranking

Filed under
PCLOS

After hovering around 13th position for several months this time last year and slowly moving up to around 7th six month ago, this past month has shown PCLOS climbing to 3rd, just below Ubuntu and openSUSE. But refresh for the last 7 days and you find that PCLinuxOS now reigns supreme, knocking Ubuntu out of its long standing first place. Congratulations PCLOS.

Distrowatch.com

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Wal-Mart Proves Open Source Is Big Business
  • Keeping the FCC and Open Source Happy
    The FCC is worried. You and they spend all this time and energy getting your radio certified, and then some bozo hacks in, changes how the radio works, and puts you out of spec. And so, back in early 2015, the FCC issued some guidelines or questions regarding WiFi devices – particularly home routers – in an effort to ensure that your radio isn’t hackable. The result has been that some router makers have simply locked down the platform so that it’s no longer possible to do after-market modifications, and this has caused an outcry by after-market modifiers. The reason why it’s an issue is that these open-source developers have used the platform for adding apps or other software that, presumably, have nothing to do with the radio. In an attempt to find the magic middle way, the prpl organization, headed by Imagination Technologies (IMG) and featuring the MIPS architecture, recently put out a proof of concept that they say gives both assurance to the FCC and freedom to open-source developers. Questions from the FCC
  • Wire open-sources messaging client, woos developers
    Communications startup Wire has open-sourced the full codebase for its Wire app, so it's easier for developers to build their own encrypted messaging clients. Wire open-sourced the rest of the client base that wasn't initially publicly available, including components related to the user interface, the web and native clients, and some internal developer tools. The company always planned to open-source the codebase, but didn't start out that way initially "because we were still working on other features," Alan Duric, co-founder and CTO of Wire, wrote in a Medium post.
  • TUG 2016 – Day 1 – Routers and Reading
  • OpenStack Pico and Questa set to Debut in 2017 and 2018.
    Members of the OpenStack Foundation have been voting on upcoming release names and the results are now in.
  • Partnerships Ensure That OpenStack's Future is Running Containers on Kubernetes
  • Open source & cloud computing
    Today’s interview is with David Egts, chief technologist, North America Public Sector at Red Hat. Red Hat has been around for twenty-five years and has hit over two billion on annual revenue. Topics range from open source to partnering with Microsoft to the up and coming DevNationFederal. In the federal government circles, Red Had made a big splash years ago by working with NASA to have incredibly fast systems. Red Hat has expanded so much in the past decade that the conversation with Egts didn’t even get to NASA.
  • Open source project on Facebook will allow you to design apps [Ed: React is NOT "open source", Facebook maintains or reserves rights to revoke licence from competition]
  • Austria awards 'Open Data Oscars'
    Last month, the Austrian State Secretary Muna Duzdar handed out the 'Oscars of the Open Data Community'. The awards were part of the 'open4data.at challenge 2016' organised earlier this year. The annual challenge aims to bring open data and ideas together in innovative and creative solutions.
  • Open data platform on Emilia-Romagna reconstruction
    After the two earthquakes that caused multiple casualties and widespread damage in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna in 2012, multiple programmes were launched to reconstruct the affected areas. To make these efforts more transparent, a team from the Gran Sasso Science Institute last week presented an Open Data platform that will provide all information on who is responsible, which company is doing what, and how the money is being spent. The 'Open Data Ricostruzione' initiative was presented last week at the Italian Festival of Participation. The platform will bring together all the numbers, figures and information on the reconstruction, and allow visitors to visualise, filter, track and map the available data. All information will be made available as open data, in the original database format as well as JSON.

Open Hardware

  • AArch64 desktop hardware?
    Soon there will be four years since I started working on AArch64 architecture. Lot of software things changed during that time. Lot in a hardware too. But machines availability still sucks badly. In 2012 all we had was software model. It was slow, terribly slow. Common joke was AArch64 developers standing in a queue for 10GHz x86-64 cpus. So I was generating working binaries by using cross compilation. But many distributions only do native builds. In models. Imagine Qt4 building for 3-4 days… In 2013 I got access to first server hardware. With first silicon version of CPU. Highly unstable, we could use just one core etc. GCC was crashing like hell but we managed to get stable build results from it. Qt4 was building in few hours now.
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 1
    Last year I had open source instruction set RISC-V running Linux emulated in qemu. However to really get into the architecture, and restore my very rusty FPGA skills, wouldn’t it be fun to have RISC-V working in real hardware. The world of RISC-V is pretty confusing for outsiders. There are a bunch of affiliated companies, researchers who are producing actual silicon (nothing you can buy of course), and the affiliated(?) lowRISC project which is trying to produce a fully open source chip. I’m starting with lowRISC since they have three iterations of a design that you can install on reasonably cheap FPGA development boards like the one above. (I’m going to try to install “Untether 0.2” which is the second iteration of their FPGA design.)
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 2
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 3
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 4
  • RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 5

Security Leftovers

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • Oops: Bounty-hunter found Vine's source code in plain sight
    A bounty-hunter has gone public with a complete howler made by Vine, the six-second-video-loop app Twitter acquired in 2012. According to this post by @avicoder (Vjex at GitHub), Vine's source code was for a while available on what was supposed to be a private Docker registry. While docker.vineapp.com, hosted at Amazon, wasn't meant to be available, @avicoder found he was able to download images with a simple pull request.
  • US standards lab says SMS is no good for authentication
    America's National Institute for Standards and Technology has advised abandonment of SMS-based two-factor authentication. That's the gist of the latest draft of its Digital Authentication Guideline, here. Down in section 5.1.3.2, the document says out-of-band verification using SMS is deprecated and won't appear in future releases of NIST's guidance.

Android Leftovers