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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Karen Sandler: Freedom from my heart to the desktop srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:08am
Story Keith Curtis to make "Software Wars" movie srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:05am
Story The Linus effect srlinuxx 06/08/2011 - 1:00am
Story How To Cut Your Linux PC’s Boot Time in Half With E4rat srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:29pm
Story A newbie’s report on Kubuntu srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:27pm
Story Loving and Hating Linux srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:20pm
Story Should Upstream Contributions Count? srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:03pm
Story Nouveau GeForce 400/500 Fermi On Linux 3.1 srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:24pm
Story You're Living in the Past, Dude! srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:22pm
Story Linux Gazette Issue #187: srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:18pm

Open Source and You

Filed under
OSS

No one would buy a car with the hood welded shut, but that is essentially what commercial software is. However, since computing began, some software has been distributed in such a way that users can change or repair it by modifying its source code--the step-by-step instructions that the computer executes when the software runs. Software distributed under a license that allows a programmer to modify the source code and freely distribute an improved version of it is called open source.

Crontab Configuration, OpenSUSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

At some point several years ago, SUSE and Redhat migrated to new multi-file and sub-directory approaches (search anacron) for their system crontabs. A helpful comment posted to my 2 March entry motivated me to learn how these are set up. Here’s how openSUSE 10.2 structures its cron configuration and provides the means of controlling it:

* YaST, System, sysconfig editor, cron - edits various configuration parameters stored in the /etc/sysconfig/cron file (this file can also be edited directly).
* YaST, System, System Services - turn the cron service on/off here.

Join the KDE Event Coordination Task Force now!

Filed under
KDE

KDE is visiting a lot of events on a yearly basis. In most cases, the booth is staffed by volunteers. A successful event attendance depends on a number of factors, if those aren't considered, it might end in frustrated, or even burnt out contributors. But getting it right is not just about "went good / bad", there are various shades of grey. Having a look at past events, the most important factors seem to be in two groups, general considerations and planning and per-event planning.

Zabbix: State-of-the-art network monitoring

Filed under
Software

I have used BigBrother and Nagios for a long time to troubleshoot network problems, and I was happy with them -- until Zabbix came along. Zabbix is an enterprise-class open source distributed monitoring solution for servers, network services, and network devices. It's easier to use and provides more functionality than Nagios or BigBrother.

Freeing an old game - Relicensing UMoria

Filed under
Gaming

People are often attracted to games before they are attracted to the free software movement. This means that many free software enthusiasts are addicted to non-free games. This is what turns some people to free software—the inability to see how a game works, or the inability to legally share it with friends.

Writing shell scripts which execute locally or remotely

Filed under
HowTos

There are a lot of times when it is useful to have a single shell script run both upon the local host, and also upon remote hosts. Here we'll show a simple trick which allows you to accomplish this easily.

To execute shell scripts remotely the most obvious approach is to copy it there, with scp, and then use ssh to actually execute it. This is similar to running simple commands remotely using ssh directly:

skx@mine:~$ ssh yours uptime
07:12:25 up 3 days, 18:15, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.08
skx@mine:~$

With that in mind the solution becomes:

Network File System (NFS) Server and Client Configuration in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

NFS was developed at a time when we weren’t able to share our drives like we are able to today - in the Windows environment. It offers the ability to share the hard disk space of a big server with many smaller clients. Again, this is a client/server environment. While this seems like a standard service to offer, it was not always like this. In the past, clients and servers were unable to share their disk space.

Why Dell Is Really Saying No to Linux

By now, many of you may be wondering why Dell is passing up such a great niche market by not offering Linux as an alternative OS option to Windows. We have talked about how this would only prove to benefit a company like Dell, but we have also acknowledged the fact that it will likely never happen.

OpenOffice.org Issues an Invitation to Dell Computer Corporation

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org urges Dell's CEO to respond to customer demand and bundle
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/add/story
OpenOffice.org's free software alternative to Microsoft Office with Dell's computers

One laptop per child

Filed under
Hardware

For some time, I've been aware of online discussions going on about an innovative project to build cheap laptop computers to be given to kids in developing countries.

The goal was to build a sub-$100 (about R740) laptop computer which could not only be used by children to learn computing skills, but to assist them with completing their other schoolwork as well.

I reserved judgement on the idea but it now seems as if it really is going to fly, with numbers of test machines having been delivered to communities around the world and large scale production due to start later in the year.

Book Review: IPCOP Firewalls - Closing borders with Open Source

Filed under
Reviews

IPCop is a GPLed firewall solution targeted at Small Office/Home Office network. It is favored by many for its ease of configuration and setup and its support for a variety of features that you would expect to have in a modern firewall. IPCop is famed for letting users setup a sophisticated firewall for ones network without ever having to write an iptables rule themselves.

Are you an open source user or joiner?

Filed under
OSS

In my previous column, I touched on the issue of what constitutes an open-source vendor. Ask Andy Astor that question, and his answer is a shrug. "Honestly," he says, "who cares?" To Astor, there are really two broad categories of companies with respect to their relationship to open-source code. Some are users. Others are joiners.

An open letter: from a consumer to the distributions

Filed under
Linux

My name is Adam Posey, I'm a resident of Elkins, West Virginia and a GNU/Linux user. I do not run a server nor I do not own a business. What I do have is considerable influence over the buying decisions of other people around me because I am knowledgeable in technology. I have grown very weary of the current state of Linux for the home user.

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

Filed under
Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

An Update On Server/Site Move

Filed under
Site News

Well, I guess we'll go with this debian install. I still haven't worked out all the kinks yet cuz my gran'babies came over today and I didn't get a chance to work on things. I took the opportunity to upgrade drupal as you may have noticed too, and it was a much easier upgrade this time.

Linux Mint: Taking Ubuntu to the Next Level

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the last several years, Ubuntu has been providing a superb desktop operating system consisting of open-source software. It has done a great job, but the philosophy behind Ubuntu prevents proprietary software from being included out of the box. This is where Linux Mint comes in.

Home networking Linux and Windows

Filed under
Linux

Lately I've been working on enabling network shares on most of the systems that run in my house. They're the various computers that have shown up over the years and are now parked in corners of rooms around my house. With the exception of the iMac and europa, every one came with Windows pre-installed. If they run Linux, it was installed well after the fact.

Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care

Filed under
OSS

My first planel for South by Southwest was titled, "Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care." Four advocates discussed the reasons for using open source. Pleasantly, there was almost no Microsoft-bashing, and only a little discussion of using open source because it's socially the right thing to do.

Open source can be very `benefit-driven'

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Over the last five years, the IT community has seen a consuming increase in the usage of open-source technologies and acknowledged the role Sun Microsystems played in the process. eWorld spoke to Matt Thomson of Sun Microsystems Inc at Sun Tech Days.

Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box