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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenSUSE May Finally Pull In Plymouth srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:31am
Story Can Mozilla Unify Open Source? srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:27am
Story OLPC XO-3 Tablet To Be Shown At CES srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:24am
Story From Zero to Drupal in 30 Minutes srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 5:07am
Story Revisiting Ubuntu Design srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 5:04am
Story 2012 to be year of Linux domination srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 1:12am
Story Some FOSS-Related Predictions for 2012 srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 1:08am
Story Linux Mint 12 Lisa Review srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 12:57am
Story The 7 Best Servers for Linux srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 11:59pm
Story Red Hat picks Raleigh as global headquarters srlinuxx 06/01/2012 - 11:56pm

Open source vendors fight back against Microsoft patent claims

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ComputerWorld: "They want open-source software companies to like them and tell everyone what a good friend to open-source software Microsoft is," said Dave Rosenberg, CEO of MuleSource, an open-source middleware vendor. "But it's clear that the goal is not to embrace but to destroy."

Book Review: Beginning C: From Novice to Professional

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Unix Review: Ivor Horton is a beginner's best friend (Beginning C++ 6, Beginning Ansi C++, Beginning Java 2). And his Beginning C text is definitely no stranger to this forum as I reviewed the 3rd Edition in October 2004. What's new with the 4th Edition, and do you need it?

Help! My Linux won't start.

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itToolbox blogs: At one stage of our Linux adventure we have all come across this situation. Here you are happily exploring and tweaking your system when all of a sudden it doesn't start any more. There are many things that could have been done from changing screen resolutions to a script or runlevel gone bad.

Google Keeps Close Eye on Open Source

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eWeek: Q&A: Chris DiBona, a programs manager for Google, talks about how the company uses open-source software and what it contributes to the open-source community.

Review: Motorola's Linux Powered ROKR Z6

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Linux It has been a very long time in coming, but Motorola is finally starting to put out devices based on its new Linux platform. The Motorola ROKR Z6 is among the initial handset designs that Motorola has built on this new platform.

Secure Websites Using SSL And Certificates

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This article will guide you through the entire process of setting up a secure website using SSL and digital certificates. This guide assumes that you already have a fully functional (and configured) server running Apache, BIND, and OpenSSL.

Hacking the Ubuntu Installation

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Extreme Tech: This is the first chapter in the ExtremeTech book Hacking Ubuntu: Serious Hacks Mods and Customizations. This feature explores options for installing and configuring devices in Ubuntu's installation process, including where to install Ubuntu, which variation to install, and what options to select that will impact system usability.

Group Collaboration With Screen

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ubuntu-tutorials: This week I’m teaching out in Portland, OR in a Linux Fundamentals class. A small part of one of this weeks chapter is on screen.

And: The Ultimate Linux Reference Guide for Newbies
&: Using “tee” to write to files and the terminal

What Does GPL3 Mean for the Enterprise?

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ServerWatch: The discussion and debate over the wording of GPL3 has crept into the mainstream tech news, which is a bit surprising. After all, it's just a software license. There are hundreds of software licenses, and in my opinion the ones that should be making the news and generating outrage are the standard EULAs (End-User License Agreements) that infest commercial, closed-sourced software.

The unemployment myth and open source

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Dana Blankenhorn: Got work? If you program with open source chances are the answer to that question is yes.

Tux500 crash!

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Penguin Pete's: Congratulations to the Tux500 team. Along with your reckless destruction of Linux, your insane pressure on a driver to carry out your mad scheme has driven him to the breaking point. He's now hospitalized with back pain. Considering the reaction by helios and gang is to JOKE about it.

A Feisty Tale - Ubuntu Upgrade and Install Issues

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Beyond Caffeine: I have been an adamant Ubuntu supporter since I was ‘converted’ to it - but I have been quite disappointed with Feisty (AKA: Version 7.04). Not Feisty itself, but the process.

LogFS: A new way of thinking about flash filesystems

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Software Storage manufacturers are getting ready to start shipping solid state disks, and Linux-based devices like One Laptop per Child's XO and Intel's Classmate don't contain standard hard disks. To improve performance on the wide array of flash memory storage devices now available, project leader Jërn Engel has announced LogFS, a scalable filesystem specifically for flash devices.

Speed up application launches with prelink

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FOSSwire: Application start up times can be annoying if they are really really slow. Part of this latency is a process where before the executable can run, the OS needs to work out which libraries it needs to kick into action.

Linux Mint 3.0 "Cassandra"

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linuxondesktop: Ubuntu because of many licensing restrictions , and nature of open source products dosn't include many codecs , applications that a windows refugee would look in a Desktop Linux Distribution . Linux Mint takes a step in addressing this problem .

Hand Grenade Jounalists - We Have Inspired The Best (Tux500)

Helios: Mr. Chastain however, comes from a more refined environment. When he embraced the Linux Community and welcomed us into his endeavor, it was with the idea that we were a sincere, civilized group who were of one mind and focus. He was happy he could help us gain the attention we seek. Unfortunately, that is not what he experienced.

And: "Marketers! Marketers! Marketers!"

People Behind KDE: Troy Unrau

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Interviews For the next interview in the fortnightly People Behind KDE series we travel to North America for the first time this series to talk to an IRC veteran and the author of ground-shaking, in-depth promotional articles on the interesting road towards KDE 4 - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Troy Unrau.

The Big Ol' Ubuntu Security Resource

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ITsecurity: If you've recently switched from Windows to the Linux distribution Ubuntu, you've probably experienced a decrease in spyware -- and malware in general -- on your system. But although Ubuntu is billed as the ultra-secure solution, you should know that even though Ubuntu's default install has its flaws, like every other operating system.

Remembering Progeny

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LinuxJournal: Two weeks ago, I heard that Progeny Linux Systems of Indianapolis had closed its doors for the last time. The end was a long-time coming – in fact, six years longer than I predicted. All the same, I paused last week for a bit of nostalgia.

Linux: Testing PCLOS

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fareast's diary: My latest dual boot fun is with PCLinuxOS. If Ubuntu is the most solid of recent easy to set up distros, then PCLOS is the fastest and most complete out of the box.

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More in Tux Machines

What you can learn from GitHub's top 10 open source projects

Open source dominates big data. So much so, in fact, that Cloudera co-founder Mike Olson has declared, "No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form." He's right, as the vast majority of our best big data infrastructure (Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark, MongoDB, etc.) is open source. Read more


  • Managing OpenStack with Open Source Tools
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  • Databricks Weaves Deep Learning into Cloud-Based Spark Platform
    Databricks, a company founded by the creators of the popular open-source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, is a firm that we've been paying close attention to here at OStatic. We're fans of the company's online courses on Spark, and we recently caught up with Kavitha Mariappan, who is Vice President of Marketing at the company, for a guest post on open source tools and data science. Now, Databricks has announced the addition of deep learning support to its cloud-based Apache Spark platform. The company says this enhancement adds GPU support and integrates popular deep learning libraries to the Databricks' big data platform, extending its capabilities to enable the rapid development of deep learning models. "Data scientists looking to combine deep learning with big data -- whether it's recognizing handwriting, translating speech between languages, or distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors -- can now utilize Databricks for every stage of their workflow, from data wrangling to model tuning," the company reports, adding "Databricks is the first to integrate these diverse workloads in a fast, secure, and easy-to-use Apache Spark platform in the cloud."
  • OpenStack Building the Cloud for the Next 50 Years (and Beyond)
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  • The Myth of the Root Cause: How Complex Web Systems Fail
    Complex systems are intrinsically hazardous systems. While most web systems fortunately don’t put our lives at risk, failures can have serious consequences. Thus, we put countermeasures in place — backup systems, monitoring, DDoS protection, playbooks, GameDay exercises, etc. These measures are intended to provide a series of overlapping protections. Most failure trajectories are successfully blocked by these defenses, or by the system operators themselves.
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Security News

  • GNU Tar "Pointy Feather" Vulnerability Disclosed (CVE-2016-6321)
    Last week was the disclosure of the Linux kernel's Dirty COW vulnerability while the latest high-profile open-source project going public with a new security CVE is GNU's Tar. Tar CVE-2016-6321 is also called POINTYFEATHER according to the security researchers. The GNU Pointy Feather vulnerability comes down to a pathname bypass on the Tar extraction process. Regardless of the path-name(s) specified on the command-line, the attack allows for file and directory overwrite attacks using specially crafted tar archives.
  • Let’s Encrypt and The Ford Foundation Aim To Create a More Inclusive Web
    Let’s Encrypt was awarded a grant from The Ford Foundation as part of its efforts to financially support its growing operations. This is the first grant that has been awarded to the young nonprofit, a Linux Foundation project which provides free, automated and open SSL certificates to more than 13 million fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs). The grant will help Let’s Encrypt make several improvements, including increased capacity to issue and manage certificates. It also covers costs of work recently done to add support for Internationalized Domain Name certificates. “The people and organizations that Ford Foundation serves often find themselves on the short end of the stick when fighting for change using systems we take for granted, like the Internet,” Michael Brennan, Internet Freedom Program Officer at Ford Foundation, said. “Initiatives like Let’s Encrypt help ensure that all people have the opportunity to leverage the Internet as a force for change.”
  • How security flaws work: SQL injection
    Thirty-one-year-old Laurie Love is currently staring down the possibility of 99 years in prison. After being extradited to the US recently, he stands accused of attacking systems belonging to the US government. The attack was allegedly part of the #OpLastResort hack in 2013, which targeted the US Army, the US Federal Reserve, the FBI, NASA, and the Missile Defense Agency in retaliation over the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz as the hacktivist infamously awaited trial.
  • How To Build A Strong Security Awareness Program
    At the Security Awareness Summit this August in San Francisco, a video clip was shown that highlights the need to develop holistic security awareness. The segment showed an employee being interviewed as a subject matter expert in his office cubicle. Unfortunately, all his usernames and passwords were on sticky notes behind him, facing the camera and audience for all to see. I bring this story up not to pick on this poor chap but to highlight the fact that security awareness is about human behavior, first and foremost. Understand that point and you are well on your way to building a more secure culture and organization. My work as director of the Security Awareness Training program at the SANS Institute affords me a view across hundreds of organizations and hundreds of thousands of employees trying to build a more secure workforce and society. As we near the end of this year's National Cyber Security Awareness Month, here are two tips to incorporate robust security awareness training into your organization and daily work.

What comes after ‘iptables’? It’s successor, of course: `nftables`

Nftables is a new packet classification framework that aims to replace the existing iptables, ip6tables, arptables and ebtables facilities. It aims to resolve a lot of limitations that exist in the venerable ip/ip6tables tools. The most notable capabilities that nftables offers over the old iptables are: Read more