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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Where KDE is going - Part 2 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:01am
Story Samsung announces Galaxy S5 mini, retains S5 gimmicks Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:34am
Story Will Bitcoin’s regulatory future resemble Linux? Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:21am
Story Quick Look: Peppermint Five Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:14am
Story Gluon Project Update Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:45am
Story 3 open source tools to make your presentations pop Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:40am
Story Automotive Grade Linux Released for Open Source Cars Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:32am
Story How to Use Parental Controls on Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:25am
Story Android Wear Review: Putting the Smartphone on Your Wrist Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:13am
Story Firefox and Gtk+ 3 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:04am

Windows XP SP3 vs. Ubuntu upgrade to 8.04

Filed under
OS

blogs.techrepublic.com: So a few friends of mine have all suffered from the Windows XP SP3 update plague that has rendered some machine in need of a complete re-install and some machines just acting as if they have been infected by some form of PC-west-nile. So instead of making fun of them for once again getting pimp-slapped by Microsoft, I thought I would try to suffer their same pain by updating my primary machine (currently running Ubuntu 7.10) to Hardy Herron 8.04.

Test Latest Builds With KDE4Daily 4.1

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: With the release of 4.1 on the horizon, and initiatives such as Krush days, recent call for help with documentation, and the perennial need for localisation it is very useful for end users to be able to easily get their hands on up-to-date builds of KDE4, preferably without having to wait for their chosen distro to provide packages. As was the case with the run up to KDE4.0, KDE4Daily VM aims to provide such a service.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • (easy) LVM on Gentoo

  • Linux Find SCSI Hard Disk Info
  • SELinux - Highly Secured Web Hosting for Python-based Web Applications
  • Trendnet - TEW55UB USB Wireless Adapter on Linux
  • Installing Opera 9.5 Beta 2 on Ubuntu Linux
  • Linux and the health of your disk

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 254

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A look at OpenSolaris 2008.05

  • News: openSUSE's final testing push, interviews with Paul Frields and Mark Shuttleworth, plans for upcoming Xubuntu and CentOS, Linux.com on Famelix and NimbleX, Zenwalk's new Netpkg
  • Released last week: Absolute Linux 12.1, Ultimate Linux 1.8, MiniMe 2008.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.0 RC1
  • New additions: Untangle Gateway
  • New distributions: Freezy Linux, Lapis Linux, PTS LiveCD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

GPL Project Watch List for Week of 05/23

Filed under
OSS

gpl3.blogspot: The GPL v3 Watch List is intended to give you a snapshot of the GPLv3/LGPLv3 adoption for May 17th through May 23rd, 2008. This Week: Interview With Marco Barulli on Their New AGPL Suite, GPL v3 Numbers, and New Projects.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fedora 9: Drumrolls with Linux Hydrogen

  • OpenSuse 11 and WiFi
  • Making the most of your browser screen real estate
  • KDE Tip - Switch NumLock On at Startup
  • OpenOffice automation for custom reports

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 26 May 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: The May issue of the Gentoo Monthly Newsletter has been released. In this month's issue: Gentoo Foundation status, Summer of Code interview, network monitoring, and more!

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 92

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #92 for the week May 18th - May 24th, 2008. In this issue we cover: Ubuntu Developer Summit Intrepid Ibex, Ubuntu Live canceled, new Ubuntu Membership Approval Boards to meet, new Ubuntu Universe Contributors, a new Launchpad podcast, and much, much more.

Firefox 3 Tip: Easily View Privacy And Security Information For Individual Sites

Filed under
Moz/FF

watchingthenet.com: One thing that frustrated me the most with Firefox 2 was trying to view security information for individual sites.

Mars Phoenix Lander - A Victory for Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

ostatic.com: Space agencies were some of the first places you could find open source software "in the wild". Being natural early adopters, cash-strapped and very inquisitive they naturally took to the concept.

AMD Releases Stream SDK For Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we announced that AMD would soon be releasing their Stream SDK for Linux, and just before the start of the weekend this inaugural release had occurred. The Linux release of the AMD Stream SDK v1.1 Beta brings both CAL and Brook+ for those using ATI/AMD graphics hardware. This v1.1 Beta release is also in tune with the new beta release for Microsoft Windows XP.

Making that old PC useful

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: I’ve recently upgraded my pc with new hardware, and I’ve been using it as a test machine ever since, something to try the new Ubuntu or Mandriva on. Both Mandriva and Ubuntu ran well on that old PC.

$200 computers

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

purinchu.net: Grandma goes to the store to see about replacing the computer with something inexpensive. Really inexpensive. After a bit more asking the clerk goes, “Well, we do have 1 machine in the back. Every store has only gotten one, but it’s only $200. Of course, it turned out that it runs Linux.

some bloggings:

Filed under
Linux
  • Transition to the GNU/Linux Ubuntu Operating System

  • Upgrade to Hardy Heron
  • Back to Windows
  • mutiny
  • TinyMe instilled new life to my HP Deskpro

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Create Screenshots via CLI with scrot

  • Using Bash Scripts in Web Applications
  • Fedora 9: All in One Kopete Messenger Installation
  • Wireless networking from the Crux live CD
  • How to get information about your file system in Ubuntu

Vista selling well!?

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: Whatever drugs Steve Ballmer is on they must be very, very good. That's the only explanation I can come up with for Ballmer telling the Australian press that he's "amazing pleased" with Vista sales.

DKMS support arrives at the common desktop

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: While today many kernel modules are shipped in the vanilla kernel and some missing ones (like uvc) are added later on by the distributors, some kernel modules are not shipped yet and might never be shipped with the mainline kernel. Now, several years after DKMS was first introduced to the world it finally starts to appear at different places.

Practical Linux home security

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Most all modern home computer users are switched on to the fact they have to protect their computer from nasties: anti-virus, anti-spam, firewalls have all entered the common vernacular. If you don’t use 'that' operating system from Redmond though does this still apply? And what packages should you use?

Lessons learned from Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

puppylinux.org/blogs: While wandering the Ubuntu site (www.ubuntu.com) to take a look at the new Hardy Heron / 8.04 LTS version, I went all philosophical and tried to think of any lessons that the Puppy Community could learn from that of Ubuntu.

Alternative distros and tools: Fluxbuntu, TinyMe, SliTaz

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: I wiped Gentoo off my old Toshiba laptop a couple of nights ago, and have been trying out binary distros with a smaller-is-better philosophy. I need a distro that is lightweight, mostly self-contained, yet also has a decent package repository for the edge cases. So far I've been through Fluxbuntu, TinyMe, and SliTaz.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.