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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Knoppix 6.0: Perfect Distro (also for Netbooks)

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: Knoppix has always been regarded as one of the most versatile Linux distros out there, but the latest version of the venerable Live CD Linux distribution has got yet another trick up its sleeve.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Transparent GTK Themes

  • How To Edit Your Screensaver Settings In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Automate Linux with Cron and Anacron
  • How to install curl for PHP5 under Ubuntu/Debian
  • HOWTO : Convert existing ext3 to ext4

sidux 2008-04 Pontos - Not for the faint-hearted

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Some time ago, a fellow user in one of the forums suggested I try sidux. Why I asked? Well, he said, sidux is Debian-based, it's light, stable and fast. After reading online a bit, I found overall positive impressions, I decided to follow suit and test sidux.

Resurrect your old PC

Filed under
Linux
Software

tuxradar.com: Rather than throw old hardware away because it can't cope with Vista's bloat, we show you how to put it to good use - read on to learn how to transform your old computer into a mail server, a fileserver, a web server, a spam blocker, a PC for kids and more!

QEMU 0.10.0 Release To Bring Many Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: QEMU, the popular open-source processor emulator that can be run as a user-space program and also has found its way into use by the KVM and VirtualBox projects, will soon reach version 0.10.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • You Can Now Play UT3 On Linux, Sort Of

  • Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Debian Lenny on the Samsung NC10
  • Jaunty Alpha 5 Ramblings
  • Is Open Source Ready To Get The Message?
  • 10 Gnome Action Movies
  • When purists become pragmatists
  • Power Management: ATI Catalyst vs. Open-Source ATI Driver
  • Application Installing (II)
  • math: Windows 7 + netbook = failure - GNU/Linux as remaining winner!
  • New CEO, New Drupal CMS Offerings for Acquia
  • Michael Jackson using Drupal
  • Nokia puts out help wanted sign on Qt
  • Linux loses more netbook market share
  • Do Open Source Eyeballs Really Work?
  • Tightening purse strings will turn many businesses on to Open Source Software
  • When open source moves from evangelism to implementation
  • Cisco's PostPath to Linux powered hosted email
  • Worker: new version on 10th anniversary
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.03.06
  • User Friendly Comic Strip
  • Sacred Gold On Linux Has Gone Gold
  • SCO files appeal in dispute over computer code
  • Free Video Editors for Ubuntu
  • FOSS Debates, Part 1: Kernel Truths

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • KDE 4.2 on Gentoo - Part 1: The Preparation

  • How to Install KDE 4.2 on Ubuntu 8.10
  • From Chapter Four: The Unix and Open source Culture
  • Remove duplicate files
  • Encrypted Debian Live USB key
  • Cork Board With The GIMP
  • Plain Authentication for sendmail with SASL
  • Save time with Gedit snippets
  • Virtual Hosting in Sendmail
  • How To Transfer Files Easily Among Linux Machines
  • Vim: master the basics
  • 6 Ways To Connect Linux to the Outside World That Are Not Wireless, Bluetooth, or Ethernet
  • HowTo force remote devices (routers/switches) to refresh their arp cache entry for a machine

Amarok vs Songbird

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Most migrants from other operating systems will seek out a Linux alternative to the ubiquitous iTunes, and chances are they'll come across Amarok 2.0 and Songbird 1.0. Which one is right for you?

Linux : the cool factor - part 2

Filed under
Linux

handlewithlinux.com: Last time I mentioned compiz, which gave very different responses. Some people think it's great others hate it. Today I'll throw in something completely different.

Top Five Geek-Style Distros

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: Here are a list of some of the distros that really appeal to the geeks, though they are not LIMITED to geek use:

Review: The Hauppauge HD-PVR

Filed under
Hardware

raiden.net: Hauppauge's HD-PVR is a video/audio capture device that samples "YPrPb" component video at HD resolutions. HD-PVR has attracted a lot of attention since it is able to bypass all digitial content controls and take advantage of the "analog hole", while doing so at a very affordable price.

What you really should know about Linux

Filed under
Linux

themysticbird.com: A lot of folks have heard of Linux and many more have even been interested enough to check it out. Thing is, a lot of what is spread around the ‘net about Linux unfortunately is giving people the wrong impression. Let me help dispel the rumours.

Microsoft Should Take a Cue from Red Hat in Desktop Virtualization

Filed under
Software

eweek.com: Microsoft's dismissive attitude of VDI, or virtual desktop infrastructure, calls to mind Red Hat's stance toward the desktop as a viable Linux commercial offering. With its recent desktop virtualization agreement with Microsoft and other work it's done, Red Hat may soon be offering VDI capabilities.

More Linux tips every geek should know

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

tuxradar.com: We asked our followers on Identi.ca and Twitter what kind of articles they wanted us to put up. KeithWatson1 responded with "I would love to see desktop tip articles", so here goes:

Free 3D Video Drivers needed to spread the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

gnuski.blogspot: Desktop use of GNU/Linux is on the rise, and one of the factors leading people towards its use is videos such as these, showing off the newest effects. However, to get these effects on a KDE or Gnome desktop, you must* use a 3D-accelerating hardware driver for your video card.

Google CEO hints Google/Linux netbooks may be coming

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: On March 3rd, though, Google CEO Eric Schmidt said, What's particularly interesting about netbooks is the price point. Eventually, it will make sense for operators and so forth to subsidize the use of netbooks so they can make services revenue and advertising revenue on the consumption. That's another new model that's coming."

OpenOffice extensions - When good gets better

Filed under
Software
OOo

dedoimedo.com: Firefox has extensions - and so does OpenOffice. OpenOffice extensions allow you to ... extend the basic functionality of the software and make it more suited to your needs, better looking and more productive.

World of Goo

Filed under
Gaming

tuxradar.com: Two whizz-kid programmers exit EA, decide to create a game to enter the Independent Games Festival, snatch awards for design innovation and technical excellence, and Linux gets a cracking new game as a result.

EXT4 is improving the Linux experience

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: It’s a universal truth that all PCs are slow. All of them, no matter the hardware, no matter the OS, they’re slow. The faster it goes, the faster we want it to go. It’s never enough.

Handy binary packages

Filed under
OSS

polishlinux.org: On distribution of Linux programs. In response to the painful article, I’d like to touch the topic of a handy and easy way to install programs under Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.