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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story uCLinux SBC for IoT runs WiFi and Bluetooth at 400mW Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 7:43pm
Story Red Hat's Acquisition-Fueled Climb to the Cloud Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Alpine Linux 3.0.1 Is a Linux OS for People Who Love the Terminal Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 7:33pm
Story Razer teases Android TV-based microconsole Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 4:15pm
Story Raspberry Pi NOOBS 1.3.8: Get it, try it, and have fun Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 4:12pm
Story MIT scientists create 36-core chip speed demon Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 3:33pm
Story What's Next For Fedora? Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 3:31pm
Story With Android L, Google makes pitch for enterprise users Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:50am
Story New Features Coming For Qt 5.4 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:45am
Story Why Raspberry Pi is still the white knight of education Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:21am

Ubuntu 8.04 on an ASUS EEEPC 900

Filed under
Ubuntu

tuxvaio.blogspot: A worthy successor to the 701 series, the ASUS EEEPC 900 runs well under Ubuntu 8.04 or Hardy Heron. Though the following do not function as they did not also function in 7.04 and 7.10:

Can XO 2 reignite OLPC?

Filed under
OLPC
  • Can XO 2 reignite OLPC?

  • Negroponte’s big lie
  • OLPC outlines XO-2; Can it deliver?

Five Extensions You Won't Need with Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Five Extensions You Won't Need with Firefox 3

  • Mozilla Launches Firefox 3.0 RC1, and It's Great
  • Firefox developers tinker with new security protections (finally)
  • Mozilla Developer News May 20
  • Mozilla considers tracking Firefox browsing habits

Are Google and Amazon the Next Great Hope for the (Linux) Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

There was a time when I thought the Linux desktop was going to take a market share at least equal to Apple’s. Maybe even 5% or 10% of the total desktop market. I had high hopes that the One Laptop Per Child Initiative would put Linux laptops in the hands of impressionable young minds who would never have the chance to become dependent on Windows. Though that plan has fallen through the cracks. I don’t hate Microsoft Windows I just don’t have a desire to see any operating system dominate the market in such a way that the lack of competition stifles innovation and forces users into an endless upgrade cycle, offering progressively smaller incremental value.

Read more at Socialized Software

Switching, literally, with Ulteo Virtual Desktop

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: We are a little bit disturbed. Not in a "We just watched a David Lynch movie" sort of way, but still, it is a little unnerving to think that our last post on Ulteo hinted at a world domination plot... and now it seems that goal is within their reach.

Also: Run your Linux apps on Windows without virtualization

Is Open Source Threatening the Status Quo?

Filed under
OSS

advancedtrading.com: A new software upstart Marketcetera contends that its open source platform for building automated trading systems is an alternative to the likes of EMS providers Portware and Flextrade. I doubt that the emergence of an open-source trading platform is going to encroach upon the success of Portware and FlexTrade anytime soon, but it could offer firms more freedom to do things on their own at a lower price point.

Also: New Open Source DNS Server Released Today

Chicks Love Linux

Filed under
Humor

reallylinux.com: There I was standing around the LUG booth at the annual Linux expo when I realised that unlike years past, there were considerable numbers of female attendants. No, I am not referring exclusively to those female models hired to promote an OS (I won't mention which one) wearing skimpy demon costumes.

World's cheapest Linux-based laptop?

Filed under
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: A Hong Kong-based manufacturer is shipping a Linux-based ultra-mini PC (UMPC) laptop for only $250 ($180 in volume), which appears to give it the lowest price yet for a Linux laptop. Bestlink's Alpha 400 offers a 400MHz CPU and a 7-inch, truecolor display.

Heron's not so hardy after all

Filed under
Ubuntu

community.zdnet: Is Ubuntu's Hardy Heron resting on its laurels? Ubuntu 8.04LTS - for Long Term Support - was widely expected to continue the platform's long, steady march towards impeccable reliability and usability. But instead of a shot on goal, it's looking more like a foul each day.

Fedora 9.0 Linux distribution review

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor.co.uk: For many of us, our first painful introduction to old-school Linux installs came from installing early versions of Red Hat. Like most early Linux installs, it was a highly technical, highly finicky process that was best left to the experts. Well, times have changed.

OLPC unveils first prototype of XO 2.0

Filed under
OLPC
  • OLPC unveils first prototype of XO 2.0

  • OLPC Announces Next-Gen XO-2 $75 Laptop
  • Negroponte Unveils 2nd Generation OLPC Laptop: It’s an E-Book

Battle Of The IM’s

Filed under
Software

linuxowns.wordpress: Today I’m having a look at most Instant Messengers that can handle the MSN protocol. I’ll take a better look at 7 IM’s and rate them according to my biased opinion.

Free/Open-source Statistical Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: If you are looking for a computer program that can help you get the results of standard statistical procedures and statistical significance tests without the need for low-level numerical programming, then a statistical package is what you need.

Fedora 9 "Sulphur" : It doesn't stink.

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Fedora is one of the top five most popular distributions on DistroWatch.com. It has a very large user base and its developers are both Redhat employees and volunteers. It has a reputation as being the first to try new things. This is both a good and bad thing.

How To Run Linux From A USB Flash Drive

Filed under
HowTos

informationweek.com: Most of the time, Linux is run from either an installation on a hard drive or a live CD/DVD distribution. Over the last few years, though, we've seen the emergence of something that combines the speed of a hard drive install with the convenience of a live CD: running Linux from a USB flash drive.

Compiz Fusion Community News for May 20, 2008

Filed under
Software

It’s time for another edition of the Compiz Fusion Community News, as I come to tell you all about the cool stuff that has been going on in the Compiz Fusion project since the last time I told you about all the cool stuff going on in the project! Highlights for this edition are new plugins - Moustrails, Ghost, Desktopclick.

What's the "Linux Tax" Worth to You?

Filed under
Linux

oreillynet.com/linux/blog: In When Do You Trade in Your Gibbon for a Heron?, I mentioned that I’m considering upgrading my System76 laptop from Gutsy Gibbon to Hardy Heron. A commenter named Scummy suggested that a similarly configured Dell system is cheaper: Dude - you just paid a $350 ‘Linux Tax’ by NOT going mainstream in your hardware…

Six Annoyances in Hardy Heron Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

mattcutts.com: I’m a huge fan of Ubuntu Linux. I’ve used many flavors of Linux over the years, and Ubuntu is my favorite by far. For my needs, Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) is worse than 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon). I cannot recommend Hardy Heron at this time.

New Ubuntu Version Fixes A Lot of Linux Problems

Filed under
Ubuntu

osweekly.com: Hardy Hero, a new version of Ubuntu, was announced a little while ago, and the features for this release of Ubuntu are actually rather compelling to me. Because Gutsy only wowed me on two levels - a better wireless stack and the inclusion of tracker by default, here’s some of what I would like to see with Heron.

Grandmom’s Guide to the Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Hardware

bloggernews.net: Well, my itsy bitsy teeny weenie seven inch Asus Eee PC finally arrived with the relatives visiting for fiesta season. I had bought it in the US six months ago, but it was backordered and not delibered on time. So my grandson Luke has been using it in the meanwhile.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

Red Hat News

OSS: Blockchain, Innersource, SQL and Clang

  • Banks are turning to open source for blockchain, says Google engineer
    Banks have historically developed all software in-house and maintained a fierce secrecy around their code, but more recently they’ve embraced open-source. They’re likely to use open source for one of the most hotly tipped technologies out there – blockchain.
  • Innersource: How to leverage open source in the enterprise
    Companies of varying sizes across many industries are implementing innersource programs to drive greater levels of development collaboration and reuse. They ultimately seek to increase innovation; reduce time to market; grow, retain, and attract talent; and of course, delight their customers. In this article, I'll introduce innersource and some of its key facets and examine some of the problems that it can help solve. I'll also discuss some components of an innersource program, including metrics.
  • Reflection on trip to Kiel
    On Sunday, I flew home from my trip to Kiel, Germany. I was there for the Kieler Open Source und LinuxTage, September 15 and 16. It was a great conference! I wanted to share a few details while they are still fresh in my mind: I gave a plenary keynote presentation about FreeDOS! I'll admit I was a little concerned that people wouldn't find "DOS" an interesting topic in 2017, but everyone was really engaged. I got a lot of questions—so many that we had to wrap up before I could answer all the questions.
  • A quick tour of MySQL 8.0 roles
    This year at the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference in Dublin, I'll be discussing a new feature introduced in MySQL 8.0: roles. This is a new security and administrative feature that allows database administrators to simplify user management and increases the security of multi-user environments. In database administration, users are granted privileges to access schemas, tables, or columns, depending on the business needs. When many different users require authorization for different sets of privileges, administrators have to repeat the process of granting privileges several times. This is both tedious and error-prone. Using roles, administrators can define sets of privileges for a user category, and then the user authorization becomes a single statement operation. Roles have been on the MySQL community's wish list for a long time. I remember several third-party solutions that tried to implement roles as a hack on top of the existing privileges granting system. I created my own solution many years ago when I had to administer a large set of users with different levels of access. Since then, anytime a new project promised to ease the roles problem, I gave it a try. None of them truly delivered a secure solution, until now.
  • MyDiamo Expands Open Source Database Encryption Offerings to Include PostgreSQL
  • Clang-Refactor Tool Lands In Clang Codebase
    The clang-refactor tool is now living within the LLVM Clang SVN/Git codebase.

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1