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Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora 7 KVM Virtualization How-To

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HowTos

Fedora 7 is still under heavy development, but premiering with Test 2 were improvements to libvirt and virt-manager. Libvirt and virt-manager originally were introduced with Fedora Core 5 to offer improved management and interaction with Xen. However, additions to libvirt and virt-manager now make it possible to use QEMU or KVM through this toolkit and virtual machine manager. While the steps are now similar to setting up a Xen-virtualized operating system with Fedora, in this article we will be covering the steps needed as well as some of our thoughts and what we ran into when virtualizing a few different operating systems.

Single Packet Authorization

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HowTos

Vulnerabilities have been discovered in all sorts of security software from firewalls to implementations of the Secure Shell (SSH) Protocol. opers in the world, and yet it occasionally contains a remotely exploitable vulnerability. This is an important fact to note because it seems to indicate that security is hard to achieve. This article explores the concept of Single Packet Authorization (SPA) as a next-generation passive authentication technology beyond port knocking.

When is a standard not a standard?

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Microsoft

I had a massive argument with my brother the other day over an IT issue close to my heart. What he was saying was that he, and the entire metropolitan police force, use Microsoft Word. He said they had "standardized" on Microsoft Office formats and did not see a problem with that.

Why freedom matters (and how to define it)

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OSS

An open source company is one that, as its core revenue-generating business, actively produces, distributes, and sells (or sells services around) software under an OSI-approved license.

Aaron J. Seigo: dolphin gets a treeview, krunner gets prettier

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KDE

peter penz committed a treeview for dolphin to svn today. in more happy news, krunner is getting prettier with transparency on the widgets, pretty buttons and the listview soon to be replaced by the "icon parade".

Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2

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Linux
Reviews
-s

Fedora 7 test 2 was announced yesterday and since they now put out livecds as well as their install images, I thought I'd take it for a little test drive. Fedora's always been a bit neglected around here, but there are good reasons for that. Honestly, I've never been a big Red Hat fan and Anaconda discriminating against my hard drives didn't help. So, Fedora being delivered in a livecd format gives Tuxmachines a welcomed opportunity to test it.

Blame Dell or Help Them?

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Linux

There is much anger and disappointment in the community this week, regarding the seemingly near-miss of a major U.S. hardware vendor finally announcing that they would pre-install Linux on their machines, only to turn around the next day that they were not pre-installing. Except that's not the way it happened. At all.

Money or nothing? Trade-offs in FOSS compensation

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OSS

What happens when a free and open source software (FOSS) project attempts to introduce compensation for its developers? Because FOSS remains based largely on volunteer work, many worry that payment might demotivate both those who receive it and those who do not. However, community leaders who have observed how payment interacts with the FOSS ethos suggest a more complicated picture.

Novell Loss Alarms Investors

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SUSE

Novell told investors Friday that preliminary results for the first quarter indicate that the networking software concern swung to a loss. The Waltham, Mass.-based company said it was confident that it remained on track for profitability, but traders and analysts weren't willing to wait around to see if those predictions panned out.

What is Open Source? The Q&A

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OSS

As justification for entries goes, “well, everyone else was doing it” probably isn’t going to win me any prizes, but that’s about the best I can do here. I’ve been assiduously avoiding the subject thus far, but I guess it’s time to jump off this particular bridge. Because, you know, everyone else is doing it.

GNOME readies 2.18 with final bugfix snapshot

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Software

The GNOME project released version 2.17.92 of its popular Linux desktop on Feb. 28. This is the last unstable bugfix release prior to the 2.18.0 release, set for March 14, a project spokesperson said.

Why I don’t think open source Flash is necessary

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OSS

Ted Leung has a thought provoking post titled "Adobe wants to be the Microsoft of the web". From what I've been able to gather, Ted is a big open source advocate, so obviously he has some strong feelings about a platform that seems to be growing. For me, I like knowing that everyone's version of Flash player is exactly the same.

LinuxAsia 2007: Open-source event puts interoperability first

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Linux

This year’s event focussed on interoperability, the commercialisation of Open Source Software (OSS) technologies and the acceptance of OSS when it comes to running mission critical applications.

A Modest Proposal for Michael Dell

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Linux

If Dell were to create a separate organisation to serve the open source community, one that was not obliged to adopt all the established procedures that have made Dell so successful in the world of proprietary systems, I believe it could tap into the pent-up demand for pre-installed GNU/Linux systems to create a vibrant and profitable new business division.

UK trumps Europe on Linux streaming

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OSS

When the European Commission launched a streaming video service last year which excluded Linux users, large swathes of the open source community became deeply angry. Now, a Surrey local council has shown that open source operating systems can be included in such programmes.

Microsoft’s Linux foray props up Novell

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SUSE

Microsoft's deal with Novell to resell SUSE Linux may be controversial, but it's looking like a boon for Novell. In fact, it's just about the only bright spot the Novell has right now.

Microsoft playing three card monte with XML conversion

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Microsoft

Gary Edwards of the Open Document Foundation, a leading member of its technical committee, says Microsoft is playing proprietary games aimed at controlling XML file formats and preventing the Open Document Format from gaining a foothold.

Linux OS Vs. Distribution OS?

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Linux

While I tried to gather information about software installation and Linux I also discussed this topic with several people. One argument I found rather strange was based on the statement that there is no Linux OS - but that every distribution is its own operating system. This is something I cannot agree with.

Review: Inkscape 0.45 is the best yet

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Software

Open source software's preeminent vector graphics package, Inkscape, made a new stable release last month. Inkscape 0.45 packs in new features, speed, and usability enhancements, and offers a tempting look at where the package is headed.

Slashdot revamps tech news aggregation site

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Web

Slashdot.org released on Thursday a new feature designed to give more participation in the selection of articles to its users, who submit links to stories and comments about them to the site.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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