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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Benchmarking Linux 3.16 File-Systems On An SSD Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 6:39am
Story Jolla unveils Sailfish Launcher for Android Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 5:17am
Story PCLinuxOS Magazine: July 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 4:22am
Story Google L’s ‘HeadsUp’ already (unofficially) available on Google Play Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 12:37am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 11:28pm
Story Korea: The government says, “we will break away from OS dependency with open source software by 2020” Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 11:21pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 9:48pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 9:46pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 9:46pm
Story SEC docs reveal Red Hat's $28.9M fundraise Roy Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 9:28pm

Fedora 9 tools demystify installation and upgrades

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Fedora project has always offered installation options. The best known of these options are the Fedora spins -- roll-your-own install images that emphasize a particular desktop or purpose, such as providing the distribution's complete repository on DVD. With Fedora 9, the project has expanded its traditional emphasis with two new tools: LiveUSB Creator, a Windows application for producing live Fedora flash drives, and PreUpgrade, a wizard to help existing users move from one release to another.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 23

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #23 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Announcing openSUSE 11.0 Beta 3, People of openSUSE: Wolfgang Koller, and Status Updates.

Two Hidden Features New in Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

sitepoint.com/blog: Firefox 3 Release Candidate 1 was revealed to the world last week, which means the final release is only about a month away. If you haven’t yet checked that your site works smoothly in the new browser, now’s the time!

Also: about:addons - AMO changes, Future of add-ons, Bundling components & more

Flock draws $15 million for social browsing

Filed under
Moz/FF

cnet.com: Flock, a Firefox-based Web browser that plays up social networking online, has raised $15 million in a fourth round of funding led by Fidelity Ventures. Flock, which was built on Firefox code, caters to people who want to stay on top of services like Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, and Flickr with features that make it easier to broadcast messages to your network.

Asus EeePC, Part Four: A miscellany of Tips and Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Since the first three parts of this series came out, (One, Two and Three) the beginning of May has seen the launch of the new EeePC 900 series. Yes, the E900 series has a larger screen but you make as well make the most of every available seven or nine inches. Other tips and tricks aimed at boosting performance should also apply.

Microsoft and ODF: Has Hades Gone Sub-Zero?

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: As I've written elsewhere, I see increasing signs of new Microsoft approach to open source, which involves loving applications to death, while undermining GNU/Linux. The idea might be to lull the wider free software community into a false sense of security while digging away at the foundations, so that one day open sources apps find themselves running mostly on Windows, with Microsoft in the driving seat.

Also: Should We Fear the (Redmond) Geeks Bearing Gifts?

30 days without Windows, and with Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron"

  • 30 days without Windows, and with Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron"

  • Linux after one year

What Freezes the System: Firefox or ext3?

Filed under
Moz/FF

softpedia.com: A few days ago, the first Release Candidate for Firefox 3 was launched but some problems still remained unfixed, like the one that caused the browser (and sometimes the entire system) to freeze.

Debian's worst nightmare - and how it came about

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian's worst nightmare - and how it came about

  • After Debian's epic SSL blunder, a world of hurt for security pros
  • Stand By Your Debian

Comparing Linux USB flash disk distros

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The recent success of the ASUS Eee PC has shown that running Linux from flash memory is now commercially viable in the consumer market. If you don't have an Eee PC, you can still run Linux from a humble USB flash disk, which will hold not only Linux but also your data. Several Linux distributions run from flash; here's how some of them compare.

QGtkStyle makes KDE apps fit in with GNOME

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Trolltech developer Jens Bache-Wiig is working on a new style engine for Qt that can leverage the user's default GTK+ theme. This will make it possible for Qt applications to optionally share the GNOME look and feel when they are running in the GNOME desktop environment.

Mozilla to release Firefox 3.1 this year

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Although Mozilla hasn't even released the final version of Firefox 3.0, its developers are already hammering out plans for the next edition, which may come as soon as late 2008, according to posts written by company executives.

Microsoft Supporting ODF? -- Close, But No Cigar

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: I wish I could wholeheartedly applaud the Microsoft announcement about native support for ODF, but I can't. Of course, it's better to have native support for ODF, no matter what motives may have influenced Microsoft's announcement, and I'm glad about that for the sake of end users. But it hasn't happened yet. Was the word 'vaporware' not coined for Microsoft?

How big is the open source funding pipeline?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: Venture Capital Journal has published an interesting article analyzing the state of venture capital funding in open source software. While some of the data is somewhat lacking* the article makes up for it with insight from the likes of Robin Vasan, Peter Fenton, Amit Pandey, Cameron Lester, Harold Goldberg, Larry Augustin, Lisa Lambert and Leo Spiegel.

X.Org 7.4 Creeps Closer To Release

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we had shared the progress of X.Org 7.4 with the features slated to be included in this next X release, what features have been postponed, and the repeated delays that always seem to plague the X.Org development community. Since then there still has yet to be any official update on its status, but the Wiki continues to claim a May 2008 release.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu, women, men, children, and the digital divide

  • Ubuntu Linux Boot CD - don’t leave home without it
  • Embedded Mandriva Linux in Samsung Network Printers?
  • 50 Reasons Why I Love Linux
  • Mal-what? Firefox 3 vs. Bad People
  • Firefox 3 will release with system-killing performance problem
  • ET: Quake Wars v1.5 Released
  • Becta: The Story Continues....
  • ODF Alliance sceptical of Microsoft supporting ODF dropping ISO OOXML
  • Marketing Linux in libraries
  • Multipointer X for “Minority Report” XO-2
  • New Drupal Book: Learning Drupal 6 Module Development
  • Microsoft can’t support Open XML
  • Are there in this world any examples of successful usage of GPL in business?

Puppy Linux 4.0 on a Dell Inspiron 1150 Review

Filed under
Linux

penguinway.net: I got a chance to check out the latest Puppy release this week. I booted the Puppy 4.0 “Dingo” CD on my trusty Dell Inspiron 1150 notebook. The system has a Pentium 4 2.4 Ghz Celeron, 1 gig of memory, and a 80 gigabyte hard drive.

Review: Everex gPCmini with gOS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Everex's gPC mini is a small, quiet, powerful $500 computer with a hip Linux-based operating system designed for MySpace users and others who appreciate the entertainment value of PCs. With a few simple hardware tweaks, the gPC is sure to delight fun-loving PC users of all ages.

open graphics card available for preorder

Filed under
Hardware

hackaday.com: the open graphics project has started accepting preorders for their ogd1, a graphics card with a completely open source design. this initial release is billed as a high-end fpga prototyping kit specifically designed to test computer graphics architectures.

42 of the Best Free Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

linuxlinks.com: "Can I game on it" is a frequently asked question we hear from Windows users toying with the idea of trying Linux for the first time. Well, the simple answer is yes! To demonstrate the level of sophistication available, we have put together a list of 42 high quality Linux games that all have the virtue of being free to play.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.