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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Changes I Made When Installing Fedora 21 On My New Ultrabook Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 9:11am
Story Ubuntu phone: theorising without data is a big mistake Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 9:04am
Story Fed up with systemd and Linux? Why not try PC-BSD? Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 9:02am
Story Linux 3.19 Kernel Released Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 8:46am
Story Answering the Call for Werner Koch’s Everywhere Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 8:40am
Story GNU Health patchset 2.8.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2015 - 12:50am
Story LXQt 0.9 Released, Now Requires Qt5 & KDE Frameworks 5 Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 9:34pm
Story The Best Changes & Features Of The Linux 3.19 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 9:29pm
Story Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 9:23pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 5:49pm

Open source developers ride the cloud

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Nearly half of developers working on open source projects plan to offer applications as Web services offerings using cloud providers, according to results of an Evans Data open source development survey being released on Tuesday.

DVCS Round-Up: One System to Rule Them All?--Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxfoundation.org: In this review, we will take a look at six different revision control systems. Namely these are git, Mercurial, darcs, Monotone, Bazaar (which is used by the Ubuntu project), and SVK (which is based upon Subversion). All six systems are distributed, and we will take a look at the different workflows supported (or enforced) by them.

Mozilla Wants to Start Watching Where You Click

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.wired.com: In an effort to better understand how people use the web, Mozilla has launched a new data gathering project for usability studies called Test Pilot. It's still just a concept, but as an aggregation model, it shows great promise.

Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

thestreet.com: There are a number of netbooks on the market, but I wanted to get my hands on one loaded with the Linux operating system, Ubuntu.

Netbooks Poised to Be the New OS Battleground?

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In 2009, it won’t be the “year of the desktop” for any operating system–instead, the coveted trophy seems to be “year of the netbook.”

Apple, Linux Miss Golden Opportunity to Snag Desktop Market Share

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: Top-dog OS on the enterprise desktop? Linux and Apple had a golden chance to grab that title, and boy did they blow it!

Like the Pre? Wait Until It's Actually Finished

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

internetnews.com: Palm is taking a page from Apple's iPhone strategy book when it comes to keeping things quiet regarding its newly-announced Pre smartphone and webOS mobile platform.

KDE Voted Free Software Project of the Year

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Linux Format magazine has unveiled its annual Reader Awards for 2008 and KDE won a 'landslide' victory in the category of Free Software Project of the year in recognition of the 'incredible' work done with KDE 4.

Follow up : On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

linux-wizard.net: Adam on his latest blog named On Linux security is 100% right when he's saying that Linux users should not have a false sense of security and impunity when using Linux. The only ways to be protected against theses kinds of issues are:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available (PR)

  • Enterprise Linux 5.2 to 5.3 risk report
  • Red Hat revs Enterprise Linux distro
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3
  • Virtualization gets a boost in RHEL 5.3

Looking for Linux, but sold out

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.the451group: I had an interesting time scouring the Internet for the right netbook for my wife. The biggest hangup was trying to find an Acer Aspire One netbook with Linux on it. It’s not that they aren’t made by the manufacturer, it’s that all the Linux netbooks seem to be getting gobbled up.

It’s All About Community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: When I think of Linux, I think of community. There is lots more to Linux, but it is community that springs to my mind. That is probably because it is like a Second Life for me. I spend much time out there, in the Linux community. But when I think of community, I think of only one thing, Ubuntu.

Songbird - Sleek , Simple and Feature rich cross-platform Music Player

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: I had reviewed Songbird close to two years back , and at that time Songbird was impressive but was bug ridden, lacked important features and certain degree of polishing which was expected from an application intended to be used on Desktops. Songbird 1.0 is an entirely different story altogether.

What this Firefox user misses about Chrome

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: Call me fickle, but I switched my default browser back to Firefox for the time being. In doing so, I discovered the features I really miss about Chrome.

New Features in OpenOffice.org 3.1, an Early Look

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: OpenOffice.org 3.1 is 65 days away, and developers are finishing up more than 1000 issues targeted for this Microsoft-Office-killer packing an army of new features, enhancements, and bug fixes.

Opera 10 Alpha - Preview

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Opera 10 is the next generation of the popular, closed-source web browser built in Qt, and available on UNIX (including both Linux and FreeBSD), Mac and Windows platforms.

What’s new in KDE 4.2? A Review:

Filed under
KDE

meldroc.com: Sometime around the end of the month, the KDE developers will unleash the official 4.2 release upon the world, and it will be picked up by your distro creator of choice sometime soon afterwards. At any rate, KDE 4.2 will include a bunch of new features, and some sorely needed bug-fixes. So, how does it hold up so far?

Setting Up the Ideal Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: After years of authorized and -- I admit -- the occasional unauthorized but non-tampering snooping, I'm overdue to offer reciprocity. I'm not naive enough to throw open my machine for everyone to examine online, but, over the years, I have developed several pages of hard-earned notes that I follow and revise whenever I buy and set up a new computer.

On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: People seem to believe Linux has some kind of special sauce that keeps them super-safe from malware. The problem is, no, no it doesn’t.

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More in Tux Machines

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
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Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments. Read more Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module