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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first development build for Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn has been released. While Ubuntu has tagged development builds as Colonies, Knots, and Flights in the past, this time around the development versions will be Herds: Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Herd 1, Feisty Fawn Herd 2, etc... Featured in Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 1 is GNOME 2.17, new disk analyzer, Linux 2.6.19 kernel, and a massive package merge from Debian. Screenshots @ Phoronix.

Gaming PCs Surpass New Consoles

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Featuring water-cooled microprocessors, beefy graphics cards and gigabytes of memory, current high-end gaming PCs are light years ahead of the latest consoles from Microsoft Corp., Nintendo Co. or Sony Corp. However, they come at a hefty price, however.

Free Tennis - Tennis simulation game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Free Tennis is a free software tennis simulation game for Linux. According to the site, The most notable features of Free Tennis are: More Here.

Richard Stallman in Guayaquil

Filed under
OSS

Yesterday at 18:30, I had a first-hand opportunity to see Richard Stallman live. He came to Guayaquil, Ecuador for the first time ever to give a series of talks on Free Software. The first talk was on Free Software and the ethics and values of the movement. The second talk, due today in the morning, was about the dangers of patents in the field of software.

Speaking UNIX, Part 5: Data, data everywhere

Filed under
Linux

One of the most common problems of managing large numbers of computers is how to keep so many systems up-to-date and consistent. Take a look at several techniques that illustrate how to move files among systems and how to keep such far-flung data in sync. In Part 5 of this series, let's look at a handful of techniques that can help keep explosions of files under control.

Edgy Woes During Monitor Upgrade

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve had some good things to report on Ubuntu Edgy 6.10 recently. So when I recently purchased a new Dell 1907FP LCD monitor to replace my old CRT monitor I was expecting a fairly painless exercise. After all, I was just replacing a monitor. Surely it couldn’t be that difficult with Ubuntu Edgy, could it? Maybe it was my turn at last to experience some Edgy woes.

How to include "My Computer” or “My Documents” icon on your Desktop : Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

For those of you that recently came from the wonderful world of windows you might prefer to have quick access to “My Computer”, “My Documents” and “Trash” right there on the desktop. This tutorial will outline how to have those icons included (or removed).

Better Beryl beats vanquished vista

Filed under
Microsoft

Even though I am quite at home on the command line and tend to use it quite a bit I am still an eye candy junkie. I suppose it is from my windows background but still I can't help it. If I am going to stare at a screen all day it may as well look pretty. I had heard all the hype about the new windows vista and its fantastic new eye candy enhancements that just makes your time at the computer so pleasing you won't want to leave it. I was mildly interested in seeing what they have done but I wasn't going to immediately rush out and buy a copy. From my past experiences from win95 onwards each new version of windows is just the same'ol'samo with a bit more icing on the top.

IBM votes against Microsoft document standard

Filed under
Misc

IBM voted against the certification of Microsoft Office document formats as an international standard at a general assembly of Ecma International on Thursday.

Making a distribution secure

Filed under
Linux

There's no dearth of Linux distributions to choose from. With so many to choose from, one might think it's as easy as picking up the Linux kernel, throwing in a few applications, setting up respositories, making ISOs and you've got a shiny new Linux distro. Well, there's more to a Linux distro than assembling applications and making sure everything works. A lot of time and effort, at least for major distros, is spent on making the distribution secure and getting updates out in a timely fashion.

Crop Circling Firefox With Asa Dotzler

Filed under
Moz/FF

The man behind SpreadFirefox.com told WebProNews the story of the Firefox Crop Circle, and how a bunch of students pulled off a memorable feat through hard work, persistence, and a nudge from Lady Luck.

Microsoft Office lock-in and the deal with Novell

Filed under
Microsoft

I can't urge you strongly enough to read the article entitled How Vista Lets Microsoft Lock Users In. This is perhaps one of the biggest hidden weapons Microsoft has in its arsenal that could sabotage Linux and OpenOffice.org if Microsoft succeeds in its attempt to plug SUSE and all Novell's "interoperability" bonuses.

New LPI policy is certifiably bad

Filed under
OSS

When the Linux Professional Institute was formed, the mantra was "vendor neutral" Linux certifications that don't arbitrarily expire. I bought into the LPI, now it is biting me.

Template contest results show off capabilities of OOo

Filed under
OOo

The contest resulted in some superior and innovative work. "Some of
the templates show just how advanced and flexible Openoffice.org's
Opendocument Format is as both a Word and Spreadsheet ODF processor.
The winning templates and many others breaks a myth that
Openoffice.org cannot do advanced editing functions like Microsoft

Directory services made easy with Fedora Directory Server

Filed under
HowTos

Directory services play a vital part in today's networks by helping administrators manage network users and resources. Now Fedora Directory Server (FDS), Red Hat's open source LDAP server, makes setting up an enterprise directory server on Linux simple. I decided to give FDS a try to implement single sign-on for a network of Linux computers.

Opening the door to interoperability

Filed under
Interviews

Should open source developers feel uneasy about the recent deal struck by Microsoft and Novell to make their operating systems work with each other? Bill Hilf and Roger Levy spoke to Computer Weekly about how the alliance will benefit users.

Manage Linux init or startup scripts

Filed under
HowTos

Init scripts are small shell programs that usually control services, also known as daemons. Other applications for init scripts involve simply controlling the state of something such as hdparm (HDD sleep timeouts), iptables (loading firewall rule-sets into the kernel) and setserial (COM port configuration).The /etc/init.d directory contains the scripts executed by init at boot time and when the init state.

screen: Keep Your Processes Running Despite A Dropped Connection

Filed under
HowTos

I guess you all know this: you are connected to your server with SSH and in the middle of compiling some software (e.g. a new kernel) or doing some other task which takes lots of time, and suddenly your connection drops for some reason, and you lose your labour.

It's Official: Release of openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
SUSE

After lot of work, we proudly announce the availability of openSUSE 10.2 formerly know as SUSE Linux 10.x. Product highlights include: Available for i386, x86_64 and PowerPC architectures, Linux kernel 2.6.18.2, using only SMP kernels, and both KDE and GNOME feature improved start menus.

Postfix with dkfilter (DomainKeys Implementation)

Filed under
HowTos

DomainKeys is an anti-spam software application in development at Yahoo that uses a form of public key cryptography to authenticate the sender's domain. dkfilter is an SMTP-proxy designed for Postfix. It implements DomainKeys message signing and verification. It comprises two separate filters, an outbound filter for signing outgoing email on port 587, and an inbound filter for verifying signatures of incoming email on port 25. This document shows step-by-step how to install dkfilter for Postfix to deploy DomainKeys signing and verification.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more