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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Book Review - The Apache Modules Book

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PCBurn: The first five chapters contain prepwork to answer any questions you might have on the background of Apache as it relates to modules. All of the specifics involved in coding up Apache modules, the various functionality on offer and ways to access it, are the domain of the rest of the book.

Extending Must-have extensions

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OOo As with Firefox, you can add new features and extend's functionality by installing extensions. Here some of the most useful ones to try.

Interview: Open-source advocate Eben Moglen

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ZDNet: The former general counsel to the Free Software Foundation, Eben Moglen, was at the Red Hat Summit in San Diego on Thursday to put his considerable oratorical skills to use, updating attendees around the soon-to-be-launched third instalment of the GNU General Public License — a set of rules and restrictions that underpins the use of a lot of open-source software.

Firefox isn't quite that popular, but …

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Network World: Although I do not follow Web browser market share numbers with the rapt attention of, say, the American League East standings (Sox up 7), I was still fairly certain that this blog headline was a crock: "Firefox has almost caught IE in browser share, now 33% of market!" It's a crock on both points, all right.

Ubuntu on Thinkpad X41 - Working With Amarok

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Shane O’Sullivan's Blog: This is one of a number of posts detailing how to install Ubuntu 6.10 (codename Edgy) on a Thinkpad X41. This post focuses on using the amazing music player Amarok.

Review: Gentoo 2007.0

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the pcspy: I'll freely admit that it has been a long time since I've used a pure version of Gentoo. By a long time, I mean I used my friend's broadband to download the "stage 1" Gentoo V1.0 installer. Some five years later, I'm quite excited to revisit an old flame.

Are the tux500 people really all THAT bad?

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Penguin Pete: In a comment appended to the last post, Richard Querin thoughtfully muses: "I'm not so sure they're as evil as you make them out to be." Nor am I. I actually thinks it's mostly stupidity and arrogance on their part.

Linux Wi-Fi: Supercharge a Buffalo

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enterprisenetworkingplanet: The popular DD-WRT project was initially an offshoot of the original Linksys firmware for the WRT54, but has since undergone a complete rewrite, and now uses the OpenWRT kernel. DD-WRT is a fine upgrade for your WRT54 wireless router, or any similar device under other brand names, and there are a lot of them.

Making waves with Audacity

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Free Software Mag: For me there is nothing quite as relaxing as the sounds of the beach. The slow crashing of waves and the gentle lapping of water in the tide pools really helps me find my inner calm. Of course, I could do without the smell of rotting fish carcasses, the constantly screeching gulls and the looming threat of melanoma. So I decided to create my own virtual beach experience using some free sound clips from the internet and the free software package called Audacity.

Dell Listens to GNU/Linux Community - Will It Pay Off?

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LXer: A scant two weeks after Michael Dell returned to the company he founded in 1997, to help repair it, Dell launched its IdeaStorm project and several others in an effort to listen to their customers. The GNU/Linux community has spoken loud and clear. Time will tell how well Dell is listening.

Red Hat and Sybase launch virtual appliance

ZDNEt: Sybase and Red Hat have announced an expansion of their partnership which will include the launch of a virtual software appliance that combines the business applications specialist's database product with Red Hat's Linux operating system.

Lintrack As A LAN Gateway And An OpenVPN Bridge

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This tutorial will guide you through the installation and configuration of Lintrack, a GNU/Linux distribution specialized in networking tasks. We will give two LANs access to the internet along with DHCP and DNS cache servers, and then we will connect our networks using OpenVPN in bridging mode. You should be running all these in well under an hour, thanks to the unified configuration interface of Lintrack.

Progeny's closure highlights problems of small FOSS companies

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OSS The reasons for the closure provide a case study of the problems that small FOSS companies face. They include difficulties in scaling, an inability to compete with large companies, and a lack of the funding needed to develop.

Howto: Use Oleo like … like … like … ?

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Motho ke motho ka botho: I spent two or three days with it, putting together basic spreadsheets and learning the way things work, and once you get into the swing of it, it’s every bit as functional as Gnumeric (Oleo’s GNU successor) or … or VisiCalc, for that matter.

Google Comes Clean on Microsoft

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Red Herring: Google today officially confirmed what many analysts have been saying for months: the Mountain View, California-based search leader is going after the software market in direct competition with Microsoft.

Linux starts making inroads

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Express Computer: Awareness and adoption among mid-sized businesses is high when it comes to open source. This is indicated by the fact that system vendors are increasingly bundling open source software with their products, ranging from PCs and notebooks to mid- and high-end servers in order to lower the cost of solutions for end-users.

Red Hat can learn from Milkha Singh

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iTWire: Some foolishness appears to be manifesting itself. Once again, Red Hat is making an effort to be all things to all people and this will end up in the dust.

Ubuntu Studio opens up

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Ubuntu is now open for business!! Yes all you crazy kids it's time. Come on in and get it. Smile

Firefox Dashboard

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SpreadFirefox: We've started a project to define and build a community dashboard to track Firefox adoption. The plan is to publish a full set of metrics and raw data so that everyone has as much information in their hands as possible, to assist with planning and decision making around driving adoption worldwide.

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More in Tux Machines

GParted Live 0.27.0-1 Disk Partitioning Live CD Out Now, Based on GParted 0.27.0

Just one day after announcing the release of the GParted 0.27.0 open-source partition editor software, Curtis Gedak is informing us about the availability of the GParted Live 0.27.0-1 stable release. Read more

Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon" Is Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8, KDE Plasma 5.7.5

Today, October 23, 2016, the development team behind the Debian-based Netrunner GNU/Linux distribution proudly announced the release of Netrunner Core 16.09 "Avalon." Read more

today's leftovers

  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart
    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10. One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.
  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels
    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and was a Linux computer. Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV. To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed
    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game. In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.
  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux
    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.
  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed :)
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root
    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.
  • "dnf update" considered harmful
    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.
  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian
    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.
  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System
    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.
  • Another Broken Nexus 5
    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement. Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.