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Saturday, 27 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Beep: a Chromecast like streamer for your speakers Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 11:49am
Story KDE Plasma at the movies Rianne Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 11:39am
Story Top 10 Uses For Linux (Even If Your Main PC Runs Windows) Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 9:09am
Story Chromium Browser Is Running Great On Wayland Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2014 - 9:02am
Story Leveraging the Power of Choice Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 8:45pm
Story Introducing Netrunner 13.12 Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 8:35pm
Story A Look At The New Firefox UI On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 6:37pm
Blog entry Justice Rianne Schestowitz 2 08/02/2014 - 6:33pm
Story LXLE 12.04.4 officially released. Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 5:16pm
Story Another Init System: Sinit - The Suckless Init System Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2014 - 4:22pm

The Linux Desktop Paradox

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: Nearly every year for the last decade I've heard some pundit or vendor proclaim from the rooftops: This is the year of the Linux desktop. Yet, year in and year out, the proclamations don't materialize.

Find the items you want with GNOME Do

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Blacktree software's free Quicksilver Mac OS X utility won over users by letting them start typing the name of the file or app they need, and popping up the best matches in a launcher. Quicksilver went open source recently, but you don't have to wait for a port to start using it on your Linux machines. Two clones already exist: Katapult for KDE and the newest competitor, GNOME Do.

KDE Control Centre

Filed under
KDE

Linux Journal: Setting your desktop's wallpaper is only the beginning. The KDE team has cleverly used a Konqueror-style window for the Control Centre with a navigation panel on the left-hand side, giving you access to the various modules.

some more kde 4

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE 4 is available: First impressions

  • KDE 4 Brings Improvements Galore to the Linux Desktop
  • KDE 4.0 - The Official Release
  • KDE 4.0 released: rough, but ready for action

People of openSUSE: James Tremblay

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: openSUSE Education founder James Tremblay was caught up by ‘People of openSUSE’ to an interesting interview.

Here come the open source IPOs

Filed under
OSS

Matthew Aslett: Fortune magazine has published a list of its hot IPO tips for 2008. Three out of the five - MySQL, Ingres and SugarCRM - are open source companies, while another - Parallels - is an open source project sponsor. Here’s a look.

More KDE 4 Stuff

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE 4: A New Dawn for the Linux Desktop?

  • KDE 4.0 Screenshots Tour
  • Howto Install KDE 4.0 in Ubuntu Gutsy
  • Goodbye Vista, KDE 4.0 Has Arrived!
  • KDE 4.0 is out - a look back
  • cashews for x.org

KDE 4.0 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community is thrilled to announce the immediate availability of KDE 4.0. This significant release marks both the end of the long and intensive development cycle leading up to KDE 4.0 and the beginning of the KDE 4 era.

Ubuntu Readers get an "A", Cnet blogger an "F"

Filed under
Ubuntu

c|net blog: The first thing you learn when you write about technology is that the people who read your stuff are smarter than you'll ever be. So let me start by saying "Thank you" to all the Linux users who responded to last Friday's post on my travails trying to get Ubuntu 7.10, or "Gutsy Gibbon," to recognize my Linksys WPC300N wireless adapter.

MIB Live Games

Filed under
Gaming

fareast.linuxdiary: MIB Live Games is a treasure trove for Linux gamers; at last count over 100 games, 48 in arcade alone. As it is based on Mandriva 2008 and to say that everything is included out of the box on this remaster of Mandriva 2008 ‘One’ would be an understatement indeed.

Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Fedora Linux without a system reinstall

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Cross-grading to the 64-bit variant of your Linux distribution can help you use your resources more wisely. ver the years, I've talked to Fedora enthusiasts and Red Hat employees at Linux conferences about doing a cross-grade to 64-bit. I generally heard one solution: reinstall. However, I wanted to see if a cross-grade was feasible at a whole distribution level.

How Do You Install Linux Applications?

Filed under
Software

eWeek blogs: If you are a command line guru, you call upon your zypper, yum, conary, or apt-get from the terminal, and you awk sed grep your way to what you're after. For me, unless I know exactly what package I want--and I often don't--I typically turn to Synaptic.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sexy PlexyDesk on the way

  • Killer lasers menace Linux Thinkpads
  • KDE 4.0 in Debian and Ubuntu
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th January 2008
  • Snoop / View Other Linux Shell User Typescript of Terminal Session
  • Konsole as a Full Screen Terminal
  • Ubuntu Remote Desktop Sharing
  • OLPC hacked to run Amiga OS
  • Financial group trusts Linux platform to protect customers' assets
  • OOXML Questions Microsoft Cannot Answer in Geneva
  • NVIDIA Plotting Open-Source Strategy?

Can open source cut campaign costs?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Having followed computing and politics since 1996 I have long been fascinated with whether scaled Internet-based computing can, in fact, cut the cost of campaigning. This year represents the best test yet of that proposition.

The Fox And The Penguin

Filed under
Moz/FF

ventnorsblog.blogspot: I'm one of the people directly working on a lot of improvements to Firefox 3 especially on Linux and I would like to summarize in this post what I have done personally that you can all look forward to for Firefox 3.

The paradox of choice

Filed under
OLPC

radian.org: People were already making a fuss about Nicholas’ claim that we’re working with Microsoft on supporting dual-boot with Windows XP, and now Bruce Perens writes a lachrymal — if entirely misinformed — missive about OLPC selling out to Microsoft. Yes, we’ve been meeting with Microsoft about their XP port.

PCLinuxOS Day 6 - Start with the Control Center, Ending with Webmin

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminations: The next few days/articles I will spend time in the PCLinuxOS control center. It is a central hub for all kinds of system-related tasks, which at least means you need to have administrator rights.

Review: Asus EEE PC 701 4G notebook computer

Filed under
Hardware

vnunet.com: Although notebook computers are cheaper today than ever before, it's still rather unusual to see one for sale for less than £350. Asus's oddly-named Eee PC, then, is rather unusual. Not only is it a complete notebook computer that costs just £220 including VAT, but it's both tiny and portable.

Also: OLPC's XO: early hands-on

Lightzone: A Powerful Camera RAW Editor for Linux

Filed under
Software

wired blogs: If you're finding DigiKam or F-Spot, two of the many photo organization and editing tools for Linux, a bit limiting you may want to give Lightzone a try. The software isn't free, and curiously, isn't available for purchase either, but judging by the 20-day demo version currently available, it could end up a serious contender.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo install memcached from sources on Linux

  • Set up wireless broadband access with YaST
  • Stop Ubuntu / Debian Linux From Deleting /tmp Files on Boot
  • Don’t Let GNOME’s Text Editor Leave Hidden Files
  • How To Redesign Your GNOME Desktop The ‘WOW’ Way
  • Securing OpenSSH Server [Part 1]
  • How to Recover from a Linux Hang
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Debian and Devuan News

Gaming News

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • Samba flaw opens Linux systems to remote exploit

    A vulnerability in Samba, the standard Windows interoperability suite of programs for Linux and Unix, can be exploited remotely to gain access to Linux machines that have port 445 exposed.

  • UK cyber chief says directors are devolving responsibility for hacks {sic} [iophk: "a step towards banning Microsoft, yet the article closes with Microsoft talking points"]

    Ciaran Martin, the head of the agency's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), said it is unacceptable for boards to plead ignorance about the threat from cyber attacks.

  • Ransomware and the Internet of Things

    But it is a system that's going to fail in the "Internet of things": everyday devices like smart speakers, household appliances, toys, lighting systems, even cars, that are connected to the web. Many of the embedded networked systems in these devices that will pervade our lives don't have engineering teams on hand to write patches and may well last far longer than the companies that are supposed to keep the software safe from criminals. Some of them don't even have the ability to be patched.

    Fast forward five to 10 years, and the world is going to be filled with literally tens of billions of devices that hackers can attack. We're going to see ransomware against our cars. Our digital video recorders and web cameras will be taken over by botnets. The data that these devices collect about us will be stolen and used to commit fraud. And we're not going to be able to secure these devices.

  • Kodi 17.3 Security Update Patches Infamous Subtitle Hack, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Crash
    The second stable point release of the major Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center was launched the other day, on May 24, 2017, but it was missing some binary add-ons, so Martijn Kaijser announced today Kodi 17.3.
  • Samba vulnerability brings WannaCry fears to Linux/Unix