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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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write a message to login users through terminal

Filed under
HowTos

To write a message to users that have login, you can using the command write. But before that, you need to check who is login, and which terminal he is login to, use command who.

Last.fm + Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

When I’m coding I MUST listen to music. It helps me tune out and concentrate. Tonight I was messing around on Last.fm and noticed they had a client download and was amazed to see they had a Linux version!

The Next Hurdle for Desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux

We just passed a quiet milestone at the beginning of the month. And while the milestone does not seem to effect Linux, it could be mark the beginning of the worst assault on desktop Linux to date. As of March 1, it seems, all televisions sold in the US are to be HDTV ready.

Top 10 Ubuntu Tips

Filed under
HowTos

1) How to restart GNOME without rebooting computer
A) Press ‘Ctrl + Alt + Backspace’
or
Cool sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart

Living in the command line, for linux: Making it Possible

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux distributions install to have 7 virtual consoles, generally #7 (F7) is used by Xorg/X11. Though working entirely from the command line does involve a better knowledge of some things, it can be a quicker and more practical work environment for some who are running commands or scripts or writing programs most of their day.

Expect More Downtime

Filed under
Site News

If you are a regular to tuxmachines, you have probably noticed the unusual amount of downtime the past 18 hours. I've known for several weeks that a change in server system was imminent and it appears I can no longer delay the upgrade. Expect tuxmachines to be down on and off over the next couple of days beginning tonight.

Stable kernel 2.6.20.2 Released

Filed under
Linux

The second stable update to the 2.6.20 kernel is out. "It contains a metric buttload of bugfixes and security updates, so all 2.6.20 users are recommended to upgrade." They are not joking: there's about 100 patches in this update.

More Here.

Firefox Password Flaw Still Open?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Is a flaw in the Firefox browser fixed or not? A security research claims that it's not. Mozilla says it is. Mozilla claimed that it fixed the flaw in its most recent Firefox 2.0.0.2 update. Chapin doesn't quite agree.

Publishing Writer documents on the Web

Filed under
HowTos

Although OpenOffice.org has an HTML/XHTML export feature, it is not up to the snuff when it comes to turning Writer documents into clean HTML files. Instead, this feature turns even the simplest Writer documents into HTML gobbledygook. So what options do you have if you want to convert your Writer documents into tidy HTML pages or wiki-formatted text files?

Open Source Means You Have to Be Better

Filed under
OSS

If you don't trust your customers and have to treat them like criminals and have to continually tighten the screws, if you have to keep everything a big secret, perhaps the problem is not them derned defective customers, but your approach to running a business.

The quest for a nice Gnome audio burning app

Filed under
Software

With a new version of Mandriva, 2007.1 Spring edition, coming out soon, I decided to take a look at the choice of default applications installed. One of the things a lot of people agreed about, was that the program gcdmaster (a front-end for cdrdao), probably was not the best choice as an audio burning application. For data CD and DVD burning, there is nautilus-cd-burner, but what would be the best choice for music CDs?

Joe Barr rips proprietary software vendor a new one

Filed under
OSS

It seems to be a trend among some proprietary software vendors: attacking open source with lies. The latest appears in this week's Network World's Face-off, which features a slop-bucket full of self-serving hogwash by Ipswitch's Roger Greene entitled "Don't trust your network to open source." If ignorance were a crime, Greene would be swinging from the gallows.

Hans Reiser to Stand Trial for Murder

Filed under
Reiser

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Julie Conger said Friday afternoon that there is sufficient evidence to order Oakland software developer Hans Reiser to stand trial on charges that he murdered his wife, Nina Reiser, last year.

California Bill Makes XML-based Documentation a Requirement for State Agencies

Filed under
OSS

Originally, reports stated that bill AB 1668 would require state agencies to use the open document format (ODF) spearheaded by the group responsible for OpenOffice, but this is not true.

Set up Logical Volume Manager in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

You can use the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) in Linux to create virtual drives, and when used with RAID, LVM provides redundancy. Vincent Danen's tip will show you how to create your first volume.

The preliminary hearing for Hans Reiser scheduled to resume this morning

Filed under
Reiser

The preliminary hearing for an Oakland man accused in the murder of his wife is set to continue this morning (9:00). A judge will decide whether there's enough evidence to try Hans Reiser for the murder of Nina Reiser.

Useful Commands For The Linux Command Line

Filed under
HowTos

This short guide shows some important commands for your daily work on the Linux command line. Some include arch, cat, cp, date, and df.

K3b enters new era with approaching 1.0 release

Filed under
Software

One of free software's premier applications, KDE's CD and DVD burning suite K3b, is about to hit the big 1-0. This milestone touts rewritten DVD video ripping and a refocused interface design. The new release represents a level of feature-completeness and stability that surpasses all previous K3b releases and, perhaps, all free software competitors.

Understanding your Linux daemons

Filed under
HowTos

A Unix daemon is a program that runs in the “background,” enabling you to do other work in the “foreground,” and is independent of control from a terminal. Daemons can either be started by a process, such as a system startup script, where there is no controlling terminal, or by a user at a terminal without “tying up” that terminal as the daemon runs. But which daemons can you safely play with? Which should you leave running?

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More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more