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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 215

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Stephan Kulow, openSUSE Project Manager

  • Statistics: DistroWatch in Asia
  • News: Development release galore, openSUSE updates, Daniel Robbins on Gentoo's
  • Portage, DragonFly BSD interview

  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 3.4e, Freespire 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Pioneer Explorer 1.0, Parsix GNU/Linux 0.90r1
  • New additions: MidnightBSD
  • New distributions: IGOS Nusantara, March Linux, S-M-S
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux Newbie’s Survival Guide - Ubuntu Edition

Filed under
HowTos

linuxbraindump.org: I wrote this document for new Ubuntu Linux users who are trying it for the first time solo, that is, without a friend or colleague who is experienced with setting up and supporting Ubuntu Linux.

Linux: Better than sliced bread

Filed under
Linux

Canllaith.org: I had some pretty stringent requirements for this machine. It needed to be able to be docked and undocked many times a day from a docking station with very little fuss, preferably being able to switch between dual monitor and single without needing to restart Xorg.

Book Review: Ubuntu for Non-Geeks

Filed under
Reviews

eriksherman.com: The book Ubuntu for Non-Geeks (2nd. edition) claims to be "a hands-on, project-based, take-it-slow guidebook for those interested in - but nervous about - switching to the Linux operating system."

Linux for Parents - A Beginners Guide to Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

simplehelp.net: Recently I upgraded my mum from Windows XP to Ubuntu. This page will serve as a central location for all of the beginner-to-intermediate Ubuntu “how-to” tutorials that I create.

Absolute Linux 12.0.2 Review

Filed under
Linux

According to Absolute website "Assembled to make installation and maintenance of Slackware easier. Built for speed, stability, security, ease of use and development (if you are so inclined.) I am as confident in it's stability as a stock Slackware box -- and that is saying something"

An offline wiki for your desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Zim looks, feels, and almost works like a common text editor, but it mixes editing features like spell checking with the page cataloging features of wikis.

SCO speaks

groklaw: With the loopy bravado of Monty Python's Black Knight, they list all the things they didn't lose. And they are exploring their options. Here they are, at last, with a statement.

Linux is Unix

Filed under
Linux

paul murphy: Two weeks ago frequent contributors p_msac and bportlock challenged me to see Linux as not Unix and to discuss the consequences of that difference. The reality here is simple.

Exaile:The best Media player!

Filed under
Software

tuxenclave.wordpress.com: Exaile is a music player aiming to be similar to KDE’s Amarok, but for GTK+ and written in Python. It incorporates many of the cool things from Amarok (and other media players).

LinuxWorld Draws Both Open-Source Devotees and Curious Tire-Kickers

Filed under
Linux

computerworld: Last week’s LinuxWorld Conference & Expo drew a broad cross section of users, from cautious onlookers trying to gauge how Linux and other open-source software could fit into their organizations to converts hoping to expand their use of such technologies.

New user interface features added to latest Firefox 3 nightly build

Filed under
Fluxbox
Moz/FF

arstechnica: The latest Firefox 3 nightly build includes a revised interface for the download manager, which features search functionality and grouping for active and completed downloads.

(K)Ubuntu On An E1505

Filed under
Ubuntu

raycosm.wordpress.com: I’m using an old Dell Inspiron E1505/6400, although it only says E1505 on the actual computer. It’s from around March 2006. I recently installed Kubuntu via Wubi.

Painting Programs for Linux

Filed under
Software

thedarkmaster: Are you an artist, graphic designer or something like that? Well, then you maybe know, if you use Linux, that there’s no really professional program in this category of software… sadly. Sure, there’s the Gimp but can it be compared with photoshop?

A new dock on the Block

Filed under
Software

The Linux Movement: There is this new dock, like application which seems nice if you have loads of launchers. It seems that you just use your mouse scroll wheel and you just wheel the launchers around....looks like fun.

Freespire On; Freespire Off

Filed under
Linux

Linux Today: I've been waiting for months for the release of Freespire 2.0. Over the past two years I've downloaded and tried many distros but had been saving the "best for last." I'd heard so much about Freespire and Linspire; especially the new CNR program installer/remover.

Chromium: An addictive vertical scrolling shooting game!

Filed under
Gaming

tuxtoday: Basically, it’s a game about blowing stuff up until you get to the boss, and then blow that one up too. You collect powerups in the form of skulls and tux-logos, which will get you new weapons and supershields.

Linux Foundation Reinforcing its Legal Defenses

Filed under
Linux

sys-con.com: There's been a change in legal style and personnel over at the Linux Foundation.

openSUSE 10.3 Beta 1 Live CDs

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Stephan Kulow has created and uploaded Live CDs of the 1-CD installations for your pleasure: GNOME Live ISO, KDE Live ISO. He writes: “Please put ‘live CD’ into the summary of bug reports, so we don’t confuse them with the installation CDs. The Live CDs are still very early in development, but we would like to hear your feedback in general.“

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: Greatly Improved Boot Time

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: openSUSE 10.3 is going to be filled with new improvements and exciting technologies. To allow you to discover exactly what the developers have been working hard on behind the scenes over the last few months, we bring you a little series: Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3. Today we are looking at the great new improvements to boot time in openSUSE.

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today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.