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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Ubuntu Phone Flash Sale Confirmed for March 26 Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 8:28pm
Story Former Tesla Intern Releases $60 Full Open Source Car Hacking Kit For The Masses Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 7:46pm
Story Intro to Grace: an open source educational programming language Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 7:41pm
Story GNOME 3.16 Has Been Officially Released, Here’s What’s New Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 6:56pm
Story LibreOffice in the browser, revealed in 2011, finally close to reality Rianne Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 6:45pm
Story How to create QR Codes easily in Gentoo Linux Fitzcarraldo 25/03/2015 - 6:02pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 5:26pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 5:26pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 5:25pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/03/2015 - 5:24pm

10 reasons why GNOME is better than KDE

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: A new battle is playing out in the Linux desktop arena. See why Jack Wallen believes that today’s GNOME has pulled ahead of today’s KDE in terms of design, stability, and usability.

Novell's SUSE Linux futures

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.computerworld: Novell is in trouble. As Novell CFO Dana Russell said during the recent earnings call, "Our Linux business is dependent on large deals, which may result in some fluctuations of our quarterly invoicing. Moving ahead, Novell plans on reducing the prices of its products.

Frets on Fire Confirms I Am Better at Compiling Than Playing Guitar

Filed under
Gaming

ostatic.com/blog: Late last year I broke down and picked up Rock Band for the resident game console, a Nintendo Wii. Given the humbling experience Rock Band (continues) to be for me, I wasn't exactly eager to try out the open source rhythm game, Frets on Fire. However,

10 Reasons You Should Not Switch To Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Not a single week passes by without me bumping in to yet another blog post giving you 10 – 25 or even 100 reasons you should switch to Linux right now. I say bah humbug to them. If you need someone to give you 100 reasons to switch your current OS of choice, you are better of sticking with it.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 293

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: An introduction to Logical Volume Management

  • News: openSUSE releases trademark guidelines, Ubuntu delivers mainline kernel, Debian elects new project leader, ULTILEX live CD
  • Released last week: Zenwalk Linux 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.2 and beyond, Ubuntu 9.10 release schedule
  • New additions: Damn Vulnerable Linux, Parslinux, Tiny Core Linux, wattOS
  • New distributions: ArchPwn, Ultra X Linux, VoIP on CD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Im worried about Gnome

Filed under
Software

hyperfish.org: Gnome has been doing some worrying things recently, firstly we have the whole new notifications debacle, it shows the rifts that can be caused by one little thing in gnome, I hold the opinion that its “only notifications” and am worried how easily the little things get turned into big issues.

The rush to Ext4: What's the hurry?

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: This is somewhat of a simple observation on my part, but one of the things I've noticed of late is how the cry for Ext4 is growing, and fast. Sure, recent benchmarks make it look like the ultimate solution. But I don't recommend moving to the Ext4 file system just yet.

Xfig: a classic program for diagram editing

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Just as there are “classic” cars that never seem to go out of style, there are some classic pieces of software that remain useful long after most of their contemporaries. One of those programs is Xfig.

Another Look at Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: I recently downloaded Ubuntu 9.04 alpha 5, “Jaunty Jackalope,” to see for myself what’s in the works for the next release of Ubuntu, set to come out in stable form on April 23. Following are some observations, with screenshots.

Opinion: Google's Android OS is coming to the desktop this year

Filed under
OS

computerworld.com: It's not news that Microsoft will get Windows 7 out as fast as possible this year. What is news is that Google will have its own contender for desktop operating system king: Android.

29 Music-making Apps for Linux

Filed under
Software

Last week we looked at why Linux deserves some consideration when choosing an operating system for your digital recording studio. But even the worthiest operating system is useless without useable apps.Fortunately, there is a long list of excellent music applications available for Linux.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Mandriva Assembly Cooker Chef for Translation Says “Hi!”

  • All in one Peer-to-Peer File-Sharing Program for OpenSuse
  • DBAN via PXE: Automagically Wipe a Drive via Network Boot
  • PAM configuration files
  • Get your machines IP address
  • PIDA: the Python Integrated Development Application
  • Vector rendering with Blender in Ubuntu
  • New KDE Four Live-CDs
  • Easy live upgrade from 11.0 to 11.1
  • German Dell Shop with Strange Ubuntu Logo
  • Fixing a Firefox user profile, and Foxmarks
  • My experience with Linux, especially Ubuntu
  • Remove Bluetooth from Ubuntu
  • VIDE (Vim with Qt Creator’s Quick Browse and more…)
  • Mdadm Cheat Sheet
  • The Linux killer 10 inch netbook

Linux saves the day: why every good toolkit should have Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: No matter if you're exclusively a Windows shop, every good IT technician needs Linux in their toolkit. A bootable Linux CD has saved my bacon more than once.

Hands-on with Mozilla Labs' new tab prototypes

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla Labs has released an experimental Firefox extension that brings new functionality to blank tab pages.

Plymouth Packages For Ubuntu Are Now Available

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last November we learned that Plymouth would replace USplash in Ubuntu. However, for those not interested in trying out Fedora to see Red Hat's Plymouth, there is a package repository of Plymouth packages for Ubuntu available.

Getting Things Gnome! 0.1 - "Just 5 minutes more"

Filed under
Software

frimouvy.org: Bertrand and I are very proud to announce you the first release of Getting Thing Gnome!, a personal organizer and todo list manager for the GNOME desktop.

'Firefox Web Developer' is a hidden security gem

Filed under
Moz/FF

techtarget.com.au: Have you ever come across a situation where you've needed a tool but didn't think you had the right one to get the job done? Like when you're trying to change a smoke detector battery or tighten a loose door knob -- it seems as if the tool you need is never handy.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #132

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #132 for the week of March 1st- March 7th, 2009 is now available.

Where Are All The Linux Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: I've read almost a dozen articles in the past week about Netbook computers and am sorely disappointed with some of the news about them. The general consensus is that Windows dominates the Netbook space.

How Linux Can Finally Rise Above Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently I had a chat with another member of the Linux media about what Linux really needs to do in order to finally reach the masses. The conclusion?

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more