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Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A tour through Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic: Last week the Ubuntu team released Ubuntu 7.10, codenamed Gutsy Gibbon, in one of the more hyped releases of the past couple of months. Tectonic joined every other Linux fan in the world in downloading a copy on the the day it was released. Then we spent the weekend working it over.

Little Ubuntu chipping away at mighty Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

nzherald.co.nz: If the battle between computer operating systems was won or lost on the basis of which has the cutest name, Ubuntu would surely reign supreme. Ubuntu is a version of Linux, the open-source OS that is chipping away at Microsoft's domination of the software market.

Also: Ubuntu Back on TOP

Free Finance Software for Windows & Linux

Filed under
Software

cybernet: Ever since we wrote about Mint, the free finance management site, we have received a few requests from those looking for good software to manage personal finances. I found exactly what I was looking for: Money Manager Ex. Not only is it free, but it is open source and available for both Windows and Linux!

Opera enters belly of the Valley

Filed under
Software

iTWire: Norway's Opera Software, intends to build on the market niche it has carved for its increasingly popular Web browser by setting up an office in the heart of Silicon Valley. Opera's new Mountain View office puts the company in close proximity to some the most important global Web players, including Google and Yahoo.

Mozilla: an open source success story

Filed under
Moz/FF

Matthew Aslett: Mitchell Baker has posted the details on Mozilla’s financial performance for 2006 and it is more good news. Revenue was up around 26% to $66.8m, while usage is also on the up.

The road to Ubuntu: Backup Hell

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: I've decided to see if Ubuntu can meet my needs, but recreating this backup regime under Gutsy Gibbon is proving quite a challenge. The people behind Handy Backup are working on a Linux version, but until it's available I'll have to come up with something else. I'm not prepared to start using Ubuntu for work until I get a satisfactory backup regime in place.

Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks - Part 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

infoworld blogs: I'm sorry, but it needs to be said: The new Ubuntu sucks - at least when compared to Windows Vista. Yes, it's free. And yes, it's better than the previous release, Ubuntu 7.04 "Fiesty Fawn" (Yawn?). However, at heart it's still just another Gnome-based Linux distribution and, as such, remains well behind the curve when it comes to desktop sophistication.

Interview with Mark Taylor, Pres. of UK Open Source Consortium

Filed under
Interviews

groklaw: We very much appreciate that you can take a little bit of time out of your very busy day -- I know that you're travelling today -- to speak with us. Maybe we could start, you could tell us a little bit about the Open Source Consortium? How long has it existed? What is its mission? What's the membership?

Fedora 8 renews tradition of innovations

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Not all major software versions carry the same weight. Consider the last two releases of the Fedora distribution. Fedora 7 offered little that was obvious to desktop users, despite some behind-the-scenes improvements and the opening of the release process to public scrutiny. By contrast, if Test 3 of Fedora 8 is any indication, the upcoming release, scheduled for next month, returns to the distribution's tradition of introducing a variety of innovations.

How To: Switch From Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld: Are you geek enough for Linux? If you're willing to take the plunge, getting started with Linux is a matter of a few easy steps. Once you're done, you should have a fully operational desktop system suitable for learning, experimentation, or even for replacing your current PC for day-to-day computing needs.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Flavor-specific Mandriva bugs

  • Compiz and Compiz Fusion Git
  • The AptURL Protocol Handler in Ubuntu 7.10
  • Is the Linux engine room overheating?
  • An Open-Source BIOS For ATI GPUs?
  • RadeonHD Mobility R500 & R600 Fixes
  • GPL v3: Was It Worth the Effort?
  • Freely rotate windows. New plugin I found
  • Savage 2 Linux Update
  • Going places with openSUSE's SCPM

Summary of new features in OpenOffice.org 2.3

Filed under
OOo

openoffice.org tips: Here’s a summary of the features from the 2.3 new features list that I considered the most useful or important to write about.

Also: OxygenOffice Pro 2.3 = OpenOffice with Clipart & Templates

The myth of the thousand updates for Linux, debunked

rudd-O: For the last six months, I’ve been reading article after article spewing the same bovine manure: Look at how many updates Distribution X issued! How can it be more secure than Windows? Let’s bury that stupidity under a ton of facts:

Devices Lacking Linux Support Needed

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman: It's been a few weeks since that announcement, and we now have over 300 different developers signed up to help create, and maintain Linux drivers! What we need now is more companies participating in the project, we have the developers, but not enough work to keep them busy.

kernel stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Caution and Latency

  • Security People Are Insane
  • Unloadable vs. Static

some distro stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Giving openSUSE a try

  • OpenSuse is Back! This time it works!
  • Ubuntu 7.10
  • Ubuntu 7.10
  • Mandriva Linux 2008
  • PCLinuxOS 2007.
  • Oracle Linux is no longer simply an RHEL clone
  • Kanotix: In praise of small Linux distros

Add TurboLinux to the Microsoft patent-protection roster

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

zdnet: It’s been a while since Microsoft signed up any more Linux distro vendors to participate as patent-protection partners. But on October 22, the Redmondians announced they’ve added TurboLinux to the fold.

Also: Microsoft drops EU fight, makes open-source concession

Sabayon Linux 3.4 Review - Almost Perfect

Filed under
Linux

cybernet: I managed to find a lot of time over the weekend to play with the new Ubuntu 7.10 that was released on Thursday. It took a little bit of extra work to get the restricted drivers installed, and then to enable Compiz Fusion, but it was well worth it.

Ripping and Encoding Audio Files in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Listening to the music played back from original audio CDs on a home computer creates clear discomfort — the CD drive is being blocked and the CDs have to be changed again and again (unless you have a home jukebox). Now it’s time we learn to rip (grab) our own audio collection and save it to a hard disk in the form of .mp3, .ogg, or .flack files.

Adding Avant Window Navigator to your Ubuntu install

Filed under
HowTos

arsgeek: Avant Window Navigator, or AWN is a neat little dock that sits at the base of your monitor and looks exceedingly nice. It’s a great addition to your compiz-fusion install (in fact, you need compiz or something like it running for AWN to work).

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.