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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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AntiX "Lysistrata", 7.0 Version Released

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has announced the "Lysistrata" release of antiX, a lightweight derivative of SimplyMEPIS 7.0. AntiX is built and maintained by MEPIS community member anticapitalista, as a free version of MEPIS for very old 32 bit PC hardware.

Fedora 8 Werewolf Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: As a sneak peak at the final release of Fedora 8, taken from the Fedora 2007-10-24 Rawhide spin we have screenshots of the improvements to the Fedora Firstboot, the Fedora 8 GNOME desktop, and also the KDE version of Fedora 8.

PCWorld First Looks: Ubuntu & openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu
  • First Look: OpenSUSE 10.3 Desktop Linux

  • First Look: Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop Linux

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 226

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A look at Ubuntu and Kubuntu 7.10

  • News: FreeBSD release engineering team back in action, Mandriva updates,
  • Ubuntu "Hardy Heron" features, ALT Linux interview, GIMP 2.4

  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 1.1 "Professional", Damn Small Linux 4.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 9, FreeBSD 6.3 and 7.0
  • Site news: User agent statistics
  • New additions: Comfusion

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Get a fresh desktop distro: Linux Mint 4

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Linux Mint 4.0, codenamed Daryana, was released on Friday. Based on the Ubuntu Gutsy packages, this distro appears to fulfil the the development team's stated goal to "produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution".

Negroponte: Windows key to OLPC philosophy

Filed under
OLPC

zdnet: While the news that Microsoft is developing a version of Windows for the so-called "$100 laptop" has caused some consternation, the head of the One Laptop per Child project has said the scheme could not promote openness if it blocked Windows.

3 Days with gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

silentcoder: So I finally made my choice of new distros. I opted for gentoo. I actually tried archlinux first but it annoyed me insanely within ten minutes. Now I last used Gentoo a good 3 years ago, so a lot has changed, here then, a short review after my first 3 days, as we speak - I just loaded up my first functional KDE desktop.

this morning's ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • One Wild Week with Ubuntu Linux

  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron Roadmap
  • Edubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) Screenshots
  • Ubuntu Georgia US 7.10 Release Party
  • Get better sound in Ubuntu with the Brand new OSS 4!
  • Why I Switched (Ubuntu vs Gentoo)

GIMP tricks: Liquid rescaling by example

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Have you ever taken a picture which would be just great only if you could remove that strange unwanted object that showed up in the middle of nowhere and now kills the whole effect? Or perhaps you just want to get rid of your ex-girlfriend and keep the photo with a fantastic landscape alone? Whatever your secret plans are, GIMP Liquid rescale plugin is there for you. Just use it!

Analyse Linux networks through the ethereal world of Wireshark

Filed under
Software

iTWire: What’s happening on your network? Tools exist to display raw data but you still need to put work in to uncover real information. Here’s where a network analyser comes in: it will separate the AIM chatter from the MSN; it will divide RPC from SMB. And the best open-source network analyser is Wireshark.

Reverse Linux Compatibility List

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This is a list of hardware that does not have support on Linux and needs Linux kernel drivers written for them.

Making Linux application user interfaces richer with OpenGL

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica: One fascinating session (and one that shows how FOSSCamp works and why it's so productive) was given by Mirco Müller, who discussed using OpenGL in GTK applications. Müller talked about the state of OpenGL support in desktop applications and described various techniques that developers can use to make OpenGL content integrate better with conventional GTK user interfaces.

some ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hello Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu vs. Yellowdog on the PS3
  • Ubuntu Studio 7.10 Gutsy

deb blogs

Filed under
Linux
  • Another Day Another Distro – Part 5 – Debian 4.0 Etch

  • Lenny became Etch: It’s time to settle down
  • Debbie is still running

few shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • KDE Quickies: Radio Amarok, 12 KDE Tips, Asus' KDE Laptop

  • Lancelot is … launching?
  • kde4 krush days: saturday!
  • Mandriva 2008.1 Spring Ideas

Mint, Ubuntu, and OpenSUSE

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Linux

Steve Carl: I had taken my Dell D620, configured with Mint 3.1. It was reliable and trouble free. What was left over from that trip was an issue from the previous post about OpenSUSE 10.3. It was troublesome enough on the D620 hardware that I ejected it at the last minute in favor of Mint 3.1. I had two days back in the office between trips, and spent one evening after everyone left setting up a new set of Linux test systems.

Virtualization: Ubuntu server + KDE/Xfce - Part I

Filed under
Ubuntu

jon-reagan.blogspot: The Ubuntu server CD is great for virtualization: it's fast, and it also allows for personalization. I decided to use Ubuntu 7.04 as the host system, since VMware Server is included in the repositories.

Mepis Updates KDE and the kernel

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Linux

mepis.org: For MEPIS 7.0, KDE has been updated to version 3.5.8 and the kernel has been updated to 2.6.22-10. The nvidia driver has been updated to 100.14.19.

Linux: The Little Operating System That Really Can

Filed under
Linux

lockergnome blogs: I began what I like to think of as my “Linux Adventure”, in February of 2006 on a short, much-frazzled shoestring. Recently, through the generosity of a friend, I was able to acquire several identical 600 MHz Celeron systems. What follows is my own, purely subjective, personal opinion of several distributions I’ve tried in the last two weeks.

My PCLinuxOS “WOW” moment

Filed under
PCLOS

mckooiker.byethost5: Last week I changed computer and since my “new” computer (Pentium4, 3.2GHz processor, 512Mb RAM) came with a bigger hard-disk I have more space to try new software and operating systems. The first distribution I installed was PCLinuxOS, and after one week of trying I will make a preliminary judgment today.

Also: PCLinuxOS Bounces Back on Distrowatch

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension

Historically, data replication has been available only piecemeal through proprietary vendors. In a quest to remediate history, SUSE and partner LINBIT announced a solution that promises to change the economics of data replication. The two companies' collaborative effort is the headliner in the updated SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, which now includes LINBIT's integrated geo-clustering technology. Read more

Tizen and Android

Open source is mission critical for Europe’s air traffic

It is entirely possible to use open source in a highly regulated environment such as air traffic control, says Dr Gerolf Ziegenhain, Head of Linux Competence & Service Centre (LCSC) in Mainz (Germany). Open source service providers can shield an organisation from the wide variety of development processes in the open source community. Read more

today's leftovers

  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)
    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.
  • GUADEC accommodation
    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.
  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal
    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.
  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW
    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.