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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Reinventing Simple srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 5:10pm
Story Selecting a distribution is a personal decision srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 5:09pm
Story Review: SolydXK 2013.04.06 srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 5:06pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 6:20am
Story GNOME 3.10 to Bring New Features srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:12am
Story Woe is Linux. Woe is Me. srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:10am
Story Move Aside, GTX 680: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 Review srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:00am
Story aseigo: App stores, vivaldi, & themes srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 3:59am
Story Shuttleworth gives up dream of Ubuntu toppling Windows srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 1:03am
Story Getting Started With Fedora srlinuxx 30/05/2013 - 10:22pm

Jury selection starts in trial of Han Reiser

Filed under
Reiser

mercurynews.com (AP): Lawyers on Wednesday began questioning potential jurors in the trial of a software engineer charged with killing his estranged wife, who went missing about a year ago.

NVIDIA 100.14.19 + 8800GTS 640MB

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Tuesday NVIDIA finally delivered an updated Linux and Solaris display driver (100.14.19). This new software release does, however, contain a number of fixes especially for the GeForce 8 series. We benchmarked a GeForce 8800GTS 640MB with the previous 100.14.11 display driver and then the new 100.14.19 driver release. The performance regression fix is very apparent!

Also: Black Window Bug Fixed?

Why Linux Is Already A Success

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: Anyone who reads InformationWeek regularly probably knows by now that my colleague Alexander Wolfe has more than a few pithy things to say about Linux with his piece 7 Reasons Why Linux Won’t Succeed on the Desktop. After reading it, I thought: Does Linux really need to succeed on the desktop? Maybe the truth is that Linux is already a success.

GNOME 2.20 shows significant improvement

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GNOME 2.20 was released yesterday. Even though I use GNOME regularly, I normally don't get excited over new releases. This time, though, GNOME has a solid list of new features and upgrades. It's worth taking a look at even if you aren't a fan of this desktop environment.

Also: Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: SUSE-Polished GNOME 2.20

What fun things can you do with Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

tuxtoday: So, you are thinking about installing Linux, but you’re a bit worried about getting bored? What about games? Good News! There are a lot of awesome games for Linux.

Divining from the Entrails of Ubuntu's Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

datamation: According to the 2007 DesktopLinux.com survey, Ubuntu is the distribution of choice for 30% of GNU/Linux users. The exact figure is questionable, but Ubuntu's dominance is not. At times, I wondered whether the popularity might be preventing Ubuntu from finishing some rough edges.

KDE and Xorg, Fonts and DPI

Filed under
HowTos

yalb: Today, I’d like to share a tip I found out while working with a beta release for a distribution of Linux with KDE’s 3.5.7 version. So let’s take a look at how you can force KDE to run at the correct DPI for your monitor which will, in turn, make your fonts look MUCH better.

PC-BSD Day 15: PAMP your website

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: One application that always finds its way to my desktop is Apache-MySQL-PHP in one of its incarnations. MAMP for Mac OSX, XAMPP for Windows XP and my portable USB drive and LAMP for my Ubuntu box. In the latter case -and on *BSD- it shouldn’t be necessary to work with an *AMP package. Installing the various component via the software repositories or packages is a matter of entering the proper commands.

My *buntu won't update!

Filed under
Ubuntu

ittoolbox blogs: In terms of updating and upgrading your operating system and all other installed programs Linux (and BSD) would have to be about the best thing since sliced bread. Sometimes for unknown reasons or known reasons the packages fail.

The overestimated Death of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

blog of Gentoo: For the last couple of days I've been reading about the so called Death of the Linux Desktop. What I cannot understand is, how so Linux desktop can be dead if it never existed?

Xen With Graphical User Interface On A Fedora 7 Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up Xen on Fedora 7. Xen enables the paravirtualization of your hardware for its virtual machines if you have a CPU with Vanderpool (Intel) or Pacifica (AMD) technology.

Commercial Software Will Include Open Source, Gartner Says

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: At least 80 percent of all commercial software products will include elements of open-source code by 2010, according to Mark Driver, vice president of research at Gartner. IT organizations will have to manage open-source software along with commercial software.

Forking Linux: Shoot the Messenger?

Filed under
Linux

infoworld blogs: As a professional journalist for over 20 years, I’ve taken my share of below-the-belt hits and personal attacks. After all, when you write about a topic – OS design and implementation – that’s near and dear to so many, you’re bound to bring out the zealots from time to time. However, nothing prepared me for the degree of vitriol hurled my way by the true believers in the Linux community.

Stretch your battery life with Powertop

Filed under
HowTos

tectonic: Getting longer battery life out laptop PCs is the holy grail of mobile computing. Powertop is a Linux tool to eek out those precious minutes of battery life by eliminating unnecessary power wasting processes.

Adding a basket tool to OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: No matter whether you are working on an article, an academic paper, or a novel, research is a crucial part of the writing process. And as with any research, you need a place to save your notes, ideas, relevant links, and text snippets. While there are tools like Basket Note Pads and the Zotero Firefox extension, wouldn't it be nice if you could store and manage your stuff directly from within OpenOffice.org?

Groklaw continues its bad old ways

Filed under
Web

blogbeebe: I'm no friend of Pamela Jones, owner and proprietress of Groklaw. From time to time over the years I've stumbled upon the odd post and thread that, for whatever reason, would disappear over time, expunged by She Who Must Be Obeyed.

Internecine Envy in Linuxland?

Filed under
Linux

networkworld: Reacting to what must be nothing short of unbridled envy at the recent uptick in the fortunes of other Linux distros such as SLED and Ubuntu, M. Spevack is asking why Red RHAT’s version wasn’t chosen instead in surveys taken by the hardware manufacturers Dell and Lenovo.

Linux Browser Review Roundup

Filed under
Software

OSWeekly: Many of you may not realize this if you are new to the Linux world, but there are other browsers out there beside Firefox. It's a powerful browser, yet with it becoming more and more popular, exploits are sure to begin turning up. Today, we will be looking at alternative browsers that are for Linux only.

OLPC machine may cause an education revolution

Filed under
OLPC

computerworld: If the One Laptop Project keeps its promises, the small green US$100 laptop could very well revolutionise teaching in developing nations. Computerworld Denmark asked Jan Soelberg, an expert from the school of education at the University of Aarhus, to try the computer.

Also: Danish school kid's verdict on the OLPC laptop: It's cool!

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more