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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux in 2011: What a Great Year srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 4:35pm
Story 2012 Linux distributions reviews Gevorg Harutyunyan 03/01/2012 - 11:32am
Story Introducing Cinnamon srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 6:06am
Story Dreamlinux 5.0 Is Based on Debian 7 Wheezy srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 6:00am
Poll 2012 Will Be srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 2:04am
Story A Quaint and Curious Distro srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 2:03am
Story Bit for byte, Linux is still best value! srlinuxx 03/01/2012 - 1:51am
Story The Best Firefox Tips Of 2011 srlinuxx 02/01/2012 - 8:08pm
Story 10 Reasons to Switch to Linux in 2012 srlinuxx 02/01/2012 - 7:59pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 437 srlinuxx 02/01/2012 - 7:53pm

Java and Ubuntu

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OSS Watch: A great deal of noise has been made about feisty fawn, the latest version of Ubuntu, and better support for Java and the NetBeans Java development environment. Better support for Java is a good thing, even a very good thing.

Server Monitoring With munin And monit On Debian Etch

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In this article I will describe how you can monitor your Debian Etch server with munin and monit. munin produces nifty little graphics about nearly every aspect of your server (load average, memory usage, CPU usage, MySQL throughput, eth0 traffic, etc.) without much configuration, whereas monit checks the availability of services like Apache, MySQL, Postfix and takes the appropriate action such as a restart if it finds a service is not behaving as expected.

MOC — Console Audio Player for Linux

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polishlinux: MOC is a console-based (build on ncurses library) audio player for Linux/BSD. It’s very easy to use, fast and functional so basically it has all the features of a decent player except for a fancy GUI. What is more — it takes a fraction of system resources consumed by most popular GUI players but still plays all popular formats „out-of-the-box”.

Meeting on Future Mozilla Firefox Support Forums Held

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mozillaZine: The notes from the second meeting on the future of Mozilla Firefox support have been made available online. The telephone conference was organised by the Mozilla Corporation and took place on Thursday.

Also: Real time customization for Firefox with Personas
And: Raising Mozilla on Linux Runtime Requirements Proposed

Windows Vista review

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Software in Review: It's been more than 6 years since the last release of Microsoft's Windows desktop operating system. In that time, the operating system market has changed dramatically. No longer are there simple, standard PCs -- we now have tablets, handhelds, set-top boxes, and network appliances. We have low-end "email and Web" desktops, high-end gaming machines, and superpowered workstations. Having tested Windows Vista Ultimate Edition I have to wonder if the Microsoft software engineers have been paying attention.

Also: No end in sight for Vista's Long Goodbye

Behind enemy lines: A post from Ubuntu

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Ubuntu To think Ive spent 3 years trying to go back in time. Trying to get MS to see the errors it has made in regards to the main mistake of disbanding IP&Ts division. But now that Im here in Ubuntu - I can finally say that with conviction - as I am a Linux troll now!

Pocket-sized PC runs Linux

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LinuxDevices: Parisian startup Linutop has started shipping a compact, Linux-based computing appliance said to draw less than six Watts. Linutop's "Linutop" can serve as a standalone PC or Linux terminal, and targets web surfing kiosks in libraries, schools, offices, hotels, hospitals, Internet cafes, and family rooms.

Latest M$ Patent Headlines

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  • FSM Dead! Official!

  • Linux Foundation Prepares For Microsoft's Legal Action
  • Microsoft Wants to 'Kill' Open Source
  • Microsoft desperate, says patent target
  • Microsoft: Market Shrugs Off Linux Patent Claims
  • Microsoft’s Patent Play: The Q&A
  • Open-source users, companies scoff at Microsoft threats

RHEL 5: How's It Going?

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ITJungle: Commercial Linux distributor Red Hat hosted its eponymous customer and partner summit last week, and among the many announcements that the company made, including raising the curtain a little on its desktop strategy, partnering with IBM for Linux support on mainframes (more on that in next week's issue), and launching the Red Hat Exchange, the company's executives were obviously keen on talking about Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, which was launched two months ago.

KOffice ODF Sprint Report

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KDE; The two days of the KOffice ODF sprint were very productive. Most time was spent on group discussions, and designing specific parts of KOffice in smaller groups. Of course, code was written as well, and for an overview of what happened, read on!

Open Source Can Make Money

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lockergnome: John Locke expressed the importance of making sure you fully understand two very important things regarding potential customers: they generally don’t care about software licensing, and they simply need everything to work with as little cost as possible. Based on this foundation of understanding, John then clearly outlined, step-by-step, how to get this done.

Microsoft Patent Violation Headlines

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  • Microsoft Won't Sue Linux Users, Company Exec Says

  • Author of Linux Patent Study Says Ballmer Got It Wrong
  • "Microsoft takes on the free world", and loses
  • What Does Microsoft Want From the Free World?
  • Novell Open PR: Fortune Magazine article
  • Microsoft vs. Linux: setting the battle lines
  • Microsoft Patent Claims Hint at Internal Issues
  • Why Microsoft Won’t ID Patent Violations…

Put The Power of Linux Into Your Business

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LinuxPlanet: Do you realize how much value is packed into each and every distribution of Linux? A Linux machine can help you solve problems that simply are too time consuming, complex, or expensive to solve with other operating systems. Mr. Small- and Medium-Businessman, what's holding you up?

Icculus Interview!

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Gaming Our very own curmudgeon, Matt Matthews, had the opportunity to interview Linux gaming luminary Ryan "icculus" Gordon about various topics last week:

Is the desktop dead?

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FreeSoftware Mag: Red Hat’s, Brian Stevens, claims that the desktop is dead. This may seem a trifle premature, but from my own perspective, that has already been the case for several years.

Microsoft reignites its war on Linux

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Linux-Watch: "Even the founder of the Free Software Foundation, Richard Stallman, noted last year that Linux infringes well over 200 patents from multiple companies The real question is not whether there exist substantial patent infringement issues, but what to do about them."

Going political and Linux the Ubuntu way

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Life of Riley: I've posted here before some announcements about the fact that Venezuela was shifting to Linux as their preferred operating system in sync with Cuba who has made a major re-commitment to Linux in an .attempt to grow its open source community and steer further away from tech dependencies on imperialism.

Also: Ubuntu, Craft, and iTunes

Enhancing eBay with Firefox extensions

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Moz/FF eBay is a great way to acquire hard-to-find collectibles. Trouble is, the best deals are often found in auctions that end in the middle of the night. When that happens, the Biet-O-Zilla (BOZ) extension for Firefox can help you, by tracking auctions and scheduling bids in advance.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.