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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Internet 2008 in numbers

Filed under
Web

royal.pingdom.com: What happened with the Internet in 2008? How many websites were added? How many emails were sent? How many blog posts were published? This post will answer those questions and many others.

All the Lightweight Web servers of the world

Filed under
Linux

This article surveys all the Special-purpose Lightweight HTTP Web servers.

KDE 4.2 Review From Inside Out. Part 2: Applications

Filed under
KDE

adymo.blogspot: Right now I desperately need to tell the world about KDE4, or to be precise, soon to be released KDE 4.2. This is going to be the first "real" release targeted not only at KDE developers and enthusiasts, but at general public.

Being Anti-Linux is bad for your business' health

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Remember today's date: January 22, 2009. It may go down in business history as the day that it became clear that proprietary software had been broken by Linux and open-source software.

5 Reasons Why Linux is Recession Proof

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: What's more stable than a rock, faster than a spinning disk, more powerful than a Windows system twice its size, and able to leap platforms like no other operating system? Surprise! It's Linux. It's also recession proof.

Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The third annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit will take place from the 8th to the 10th of April in San Francisco, California at the Hotel Kabuki.

Why Google open-sources code: 'Fuzzy feelings'

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: Google's desktop team has put together a short list of the reasons that Google open-sources software. The reasons may surprise you:

Open Solutions Alliance - not off-course for open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I read a fairly critical blog about Gold and the OSA from Glyn Moody. I believe that Moody raises some valid points and offers Gold the opportunity to clarify the OSA’s dedication to truly open standards and openness in enterprise software later in the comments. However, I must disagree.

It's time to customize the OS

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Mass customization -- the process of customizing a product to meet individual needs while leveraging mass production efficiency -- is commonplace in manufacturing everything from cars to laptops. Yet the operating system has remained monolithic. Ironically, Linux is modular and designed to be customized.

Brilliant scripting with Guile

Filed under
Linux

Guile isn't just another extension language: it's the official extension language of the GNU project. Guile makes Scheme embeddable, which makes the interpreter ideal for embedded scripting and more.

LCA2009: It's a Linux conference - but there's Macs aplenty

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: One thing that has been increasing exponentially at the Australian national Linux conference is that shiny, steel-grey laptop - or, at times, the sleek white one.

"In the Middle of Difficulty Lies Opportunity"

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxfoundation.org/blog-entry: Today's surprising news of 5,000 Microsoft jobs cut might be good news or bad for Linux, depending on how you look at it. As a Linux advocate, it's very easy to sit here and start spouting off that this is what Microsoft deserves, after running big and bloated for so long.

Does Windows 7 Threaten Mac OS and Linux?

Filed under
OS

earthweb.com: Does a good OS from Microsoft put the pressure back on Apple and the Linux development community? After all, both the Mac OS and Linux have benefitted from the fact that early adopters of Vista experienced declared the OS a lemon, with the worldwide market share in both OSes climbing significantly over the past couple of years.

The Netbook Newbie's Guide to Linux

Filed under
Linux

reghardware.co.uk: True to its name, a netbook makes a very decent ebook reader. Here's the freely-downloadable Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, complete with original Tenniel illustrations, as it appears on the MSI Wind:

Darwin at 200 and Linux at 20

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: This post is about things that look like other things but really are very different in origin and structure. For example desktop interfaces now look pretty similar to me.

LCA2009: Why ODF should be the chosen one

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: It is difficult to know whether Louis Suarez-Potts, community manager at OpenOffice.org, was conscious at any point today of the irony of criticising proprietary software while making a presentation using a MacBook.

Ext4 to be standard for Fedora 11, Btrfs also included

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: According to current plans, version 11 of Fedora, which is expected to arrive in late May, will use Ext4 as its standard file system. That's what the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo) recently decided, following a heated discussion in an IRC meeting.

Cloning Linux Systems With CloneZilla Server Edition (CloneZilla SE)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can clone Linux systems with CloneZilla SE. This is useful for copying one Linux installation to multiple computers without losing much time, e.g. in a classroom, or also for creating an image-based backup of a system.

Hidden Linux : More secure deletion tools

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Last time I introduced a couple of open source tools to securely delete files, folders or whole hard drives. Naturally Linux has more!

GNU/Linux races for Best Desktop

Filed under
Linux

norsetto.890m: La Repubblica, one of the two major Italian newspapers, has opened a competition for the most beautiful, original personal desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Red Hat Women’s Leadership Community Luncheon, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 Beta, Stratis and More

KDE at FOSS-North and Cutelyst 2.2.0 Release

  • KDE at FOSS-North
    Over the weekend, while some KDE people were in Toulouse improving Akonadi, and other KDE people were in Berlin improving Plasma, I was in Goteborg at FOSS-North showing off some KDE things. Anyone who saw our FOSDEM booth knows the setup. We still had the same blue table (thanks, Sune) and selection of low-power ARM blinkenlights, the Pine64 and a Pinebook. I still think that “hey, Plasma runs fine on an overpowered x86 laptop” is not particularly interesting, but that “the past six months have seen serious work on reducing Plasma’s resource usage aimed specifically at this kind of device” is. Different from FOSDEM is that I could now run one of the just-released Netrunner images for the Pinebook.
  • Cutelyst 2.2.0 is out
    Thanks to the release of Virtlyst – a web manager for virtual machines, several bugs were found and fixed in Cutelyst, the most important one in this release is the WebSockets implementation that broke due the addition of HTTP/2 to cutelyst-wsgi2. Fixing this was quite interesting as when I fixed the issue the first time, it started to make deleteLater() calls on null objects which didn’t crash but since Qt warn’s you about that it was hurting performance. Then I fixed the deleteLater() calls and WebSockets broke again

Security: Updates, Europol/DDOS, ZTE, F-Secure

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • EU cyber cops shut down 'world's biggest' DDoS-for-hire service

    The website's servers were seized at 11.30am in the Netherlands, the US and Germany, Europol said, effectively shutting down the service that had 136,000 registered users and enabled individuals with little or no technical knowledge to launch crippling cyber-attacks across the world for just $14.99.

  • ZTE router flaw put 400,000 Hyperoptic customers at hacking [sic] risk

    But security firm Context IS discovered that the devices contained "the combination of a hardcoded root account and a DNS rebinding vulnerability", which could have allowed an "internet-based attacker to compromise all customer routers of UK ISP Hyperoptic via a malicious webpage".

  • Researchers Spent 10 Years Creating This “Master Key” To Unlock Millions Of Hotel Rooms
    A team of security researchers at F-secure have created a device running custom software that can create a master key “out of thin air.” They’ve exploited vulnerabilities in the door lock software Vision by VingCard, developed by the Swedish company Assa Abloy. Their electronic door locking system is used in millions of hotel rooms across the globe.
  • F-Secure Researchers: Master Keys to Hotels Can be Created ‘Out of Thin Air’
    F-Secure researchers have found that global hotel chains and hotels worldwide are using an electronic lock system that could be exploited by an attacker to gain access to any room in the facility. The design flaws discovered in the lock system’s software, which is known as Vision by VingCard and used to secure millions of hotel rooms worldwide, have prompted the world’s largest lock manufacturer, Assa Abloy, to issue software updates with security fixes to mitigate the issue.
  • Hackers built a 'master key' for millions of hotel rooms
    Security researchers have built a master key that exploits a design flaw in a popular and widely used hotel electronic lock system, allowing unfettered access to every room in the building. The electronic lock system, known as Vision by VingCard and built by Swedish lock manufacturer Assa Abloy, is used in more than 42,000 properties in 166 countries, amounting to millions of hotel rooms -- as well as garages and storage units.

Mozilla: Localization, VR, WebAssembly and More

  • Localization Workshop in Kolkata (November 2017)
    Last November, Jeff, Peiying and I (flod) headed to Kolkata for the last of our planned localization workshops. The group of languages represented at the event included Bengali (both Bangladesh and India), Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Nepali, Odia, Tamil and Telugu. If you’re surprised by the number of languages, consider that India alone has 22 languages listed in the Indian Constitution, but that’s only the tip of the iceberg, with a much larger variety of languages spoken, and sometime officially recognized at the State level.
  • Making a Web Thing on the ESP8266
    Today I’m going to walk you through creating a simple Web Thing using an inexpensive off-the-shelf ESP8266 board. The power of web things comes from their ability to connect the digital world of web pages with the physical world of things. We recently released the Things Framework, a collection of software intended to make it easy to create new web things. The relevant library for this example is the webthing-esp8266 library, which makes easy it to connect Arduino-programmed ESP8266 boards with the Web of Things. We hope that this lowers the barrier to creating compelling experiences with our gateway and the Web Thing API.
  • Introducing Hubs: A new way to get together
    Today, we’re excited to share a preview release of Hubs by Mozilla, a new way to get together online within Mixed Reality, right in your browser. Hubs is the first experiment we’re releasing as part of our Social Mixed Reality efforts, and we think it showcases the potential for the web to become the best, most accessible platform to bring people together around the world in this new medium.
  • Enabling Social Experiences Using Mixed Reality and the Open Web
    Today, Mozilla is sharing an early preview of an experiment we are calling “Hubs by Mozilla”. Hubs is an immersive social experience that is delivered through the browser. You simply click on a web link to begin interacting with others inside virtual reality.
  • How does dynamic dispatch work in WebAssembly?
    WebAssembly is a stack-based virtual machine and instruction set, designed such that implementations can be fast and safe. It is a portable target for the compilation of languages like C, C++, and Rust. [...] But C, C++, and Rust all have some capability for dynamic dispatch: function pointers, virtual methods, and trait objects. On native targets like x86, all these forms compile down into a jump to a dynamic address. What do these forms compile down into when targeting WebAssembly?
  • BlinkOn 9: Working on the Web Platform from a cooperative
    Last week, I attended BlinkOn 9. I was very happy to spend some time with my colleagues working on Chromium, including a new developer who will join my team next week (to be announced soon!). This edition had the usual format with presentations, brainstorming, lightning talks and informal chats with Chromium developers. I attended several interesting presentations on web platform standardization, implementation and testing. It was also great to talk to Googlers in order to coordinate on some of Igalia’s projects such as the collaboration with AMP or MathML in Chromium.