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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Chasing the wrong problems Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2014 - 8:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2014 - 12:46am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2014 - 12:46am
Story The Linux 3.18 Kernel Brings Many Great Changes Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 10:35pm
Story Separating The Opportunities From The Obstacles In Open-Source Networking Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 9:35pm
Story 11 open source tools to make the most of machine learning Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 8:51pm
Story PuzzlePhone: An open-source Project Ara challenger appears Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 8:38pm
Story A Week in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 8:34pm
Story Open-source tools will benefit military and Wisconsin vehicle makers Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 8:27pm
Story A huge leak may have just revealed the Galaxy S6’s monster specs Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2014 - 6:37pm

few for ubuntu fans

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 1 day with Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • 8 Reasons to try UBUNTU
  • Multimedia Support in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 44

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #44 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Less than 50 days to openSUSE 11.1, Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election, and OpenOffice.org 3.0 final.

Faces behind Popular Programming Languages

Filed under
Software

yabblog.com: It’s quite fascinating to become familiar with the faces behind these programming languages, in which we spend hours learning or using it. Although the list may not be comprehensive but it contains almost all the popular programming language used in modern times.

A Visual Desktop Tour of 9 Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu, undoubtedly today's most popular Linux distribution has been around for 4 years. Its first official version was released in October of 2004. In the span of four years, Ubuntu has already unleashed 9 stable versions including the recently released Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex". Let's take a visual desktop tour of Ubuntu starting from its inaugural version:

Ubuntu 8.10 is here. And it rocks!

Filed under
Ubuntu

I downloaded Ubuntu 8.10 "Interbid Ibex" today and i am currently using it as a Live-CD. Everything seems to be working perfectly until now, so i will install it tomorrow and suggest it to all my friends & colleagues if no serious problem arises. What did i like the first 2 hours of use?

Fedora 10 Cambridge - Review & Tutorial

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I love RedHat-based distros. My favorite "server" distro is CentOS. Fedora is a community-developed distro, RPM-based, derived from RedHat when it turned into an enterprise product. CentOS branched off to mimic the enterprise releases as the server distro and Fedora became a household item. Fedora 10 Cambridge is the latest.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to use KDB in the openSUSE installation system

  • Install Puppy Linux in Ubuntu
  • Create avatars with MeMaker in Ubuntu
  • Fun with Linux Commands-III - Being productive
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Install using the built in USB Installer
  • The Linux Support Call HOWNOTTO

Compiz Fusion and X.org MPX and Input Redirection Patches are now out

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: I figured that I should publish these before murphy’s law ensures that I either have a 1% chance of living the next day, or that the Australian Government censors me.

How To Upgrade Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) To 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) (Desktop & Server)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Today the new Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) has been released. This guide shows how you can upgrade your Ubuntu 8.04 desktop and server installations to Ubuntu 8.10.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Operating System

  • Too Late For Halloween - Almost Linux/Unix Humor
  • Building Online Success With Drupal
  • BBC prepares to stream content free to Linux users
  • Interview: Chris Morgan on Jopr
  • GDM 2.24 aka SMB (Shoot Me Bloody)
  • Selected Ibex Bugs
  • Linux to out ship Windows by next year … maybe not!
  • Four True Tech Horror Stories
  • Windows 7: Microsoft's Linux killer?
  • New beta version of Google's Chrome browser

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install KDE 4.1 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Controlling fanspeeds in Linux on PWM motherboards, Thinkpads and ASUS Eee PC
  • How to properly start compiz in Gnome
  • Restoring Data from rdiff-backup
  • Create a LAN for Virtual Servers with KVM and VDE
  • Installing Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer in openSUSE with Crossover
  • Free Memory by dropping caches
  • Using Calc to manage schedules
  • Transparent compression of files on optical media
  • How To Easily Add A Custom Search Engine To Your Firefox Search Bar

A Halloween blog of open source fog

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I like to write a Halloween-theme article or blog every year, and this year, there is no shortage of costuming and character portrayal from vendors turning up in places you’d never expect them.

Does Linux Deliver For Small Businesses?

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: The answer is Yes, it does, though with some qualifications. The short answer: it's all in the implementation. The long answer starts with taking a look at Canonical's successes in opening new doors for Linux deployments.

OpenSUSE Starts Steering its Own Course

Filed under
SUSE

linuxplanet.com: It's not easy for a Linux company to let go the reins of control over its community Linux distribution. Just ask Red Hat, which started to let go of Fedora and then decided to keep managing it (Red Hat keeps its grip on Fedora). But, now Novell is loosening its apron strings on its community Linux openSUSE.

Also: RealPlayer dropped from openSUSE, here’s why
And: Status update for openSUSE 11.1 beta 4

more ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Call of Cthubuntu

  • Ubuntu 8.10 Charges Up the Mountain
  • First Look: Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Edition, Intrepid Ibex
  • Ubuntu 8.10: Canonical Improves Marketing And PR Focus
  • 10 Things To Do After You Install Ubuntu Linux

Using Your Linux Computer As A Media Server (Part 2)

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Previously, I have discussed how you can use your Linux computer as a media center. Now, if you are not in front of your Linux machine most of the time, but still want to access all your media files from any internet connected devices such as your smart phone, workplace computer, PDA or even PS3, the only option is to set up your Linux computer as a media server and stream your multimedia content to wherever you are over the internet.

'Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Review : A Mixed Bag'

Filed under
MDV

techenclave.com: Mandriva 2009.0 features latest Desktop Environments, tools and application to attract more and more users .. Tagged the most user friendly distro , Mandriva 2009.0 try to live up to the expectations … Mandriva 2009.0 packs in a lot of changes including the inclusion of the latest gun of Open Source community.

20+ Firefox 3 Security and Privacy Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

mashable.com: While Firefox is considered a safe browser by most people, it can never hurt to add more layers of security in this day and age. And while you’re at it, there are a number of ways to increase your privacy online. Here are over 20.

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Funny FireFox Ads

  • Linux Journal Live - Horror Stories
  • Linux Basement - Episode 30 - Season Finale and OLF

How Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS, Ever

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

oreilly.com: Kroah-Hartman is a longtime developer of the Linux kernel, known for his work maintaining USB drivers as well as for packaging the SUSE kernel at Novell. O'Reilly Media recently interviewed Greg about his claim that the Linux kernel now supports more devices than any other operating system ever.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.