Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 5:04am
Story Blender 2.61 Released srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 4:09am
Story Open source is not a dumping ground srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:46am
Story Researchers accuse Google of plotting to undercut Firefox srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:38am
Story Linux Mint Agree Amazon Revenue Share srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:19am
Blog entry Subsonic Media Streamer 4.6: The Proper Review fieldyweb 14/12/2011 - 11:06pm
Story Ubuntu-related Xmas Gift Ideas srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:40pm
Story Plasma Active Two Released srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:26pm
Story CentOS vs. Oracle vs. Scientific Linux 6.1 Performance srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:24pm
Story Can open source save the planet? srlinuxx 14/12/2011 - 10:22pm

Enchanting Pictures with ImageMagick

Filed under

polishlinux: Since digital still cameras hit mainstream, we’ve all become flooded with hundreds of photos. Luckily there are some free magicians available, who can answer our call for help and automate all processes causing them take minutes instead of days.

Also: Managing Photos on your Desktop Linux Installation

Gentoo's Graphical Installer is Unnecessary

Filed under

daniweb: Gentoo has long been a distribution aimed towards the power Linux user. With this year's first Gentoo release, 2007.0, comes an updated LiveCD featuring a completely rewritten GTK+ based installer. The bigger question is, why provide a GTK+ based installer in the first place?

Also: Ubuntu User on Installing Gentoo

KDE tip - taking screenshots

Filed under

FOSSwire: In GNOME, it’s really easy to take a screenshot of your system, you just hit Print Screen and a handy window pops up where you can save it. For some reason, this functionality doesn’t work with KDE out of the box, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take screenshots.

Microsoft is not the boss, we are

Filed under
Microsoft After celebrations over Dell announcing that it will soon be selling GNU/Linux Ubuntu desktops and laptops we are seeing a bit of an uproar after, just a week later, Microsoft announced it's partnership with Dell akin to the one it made with Novell last November.

A Day Without Open Source

Filed under

bmc blogs: I was at a conference when two techies walked into the open bar, one an open source supporter and one staunchly anti. They got into it a bit after a few drinks, and Mr. Anti commented loudly, “I wish open source would just go away! It causes more trouble than it's worth.”

Why Is Dell Buying SLES certificates from Microsoft, Not Novell?

Filed under

Groklaw: According to sources, Dell will be selling SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server) certificates, which it will obtain from Microsoft. As part of the Novell/Microsoft deal, Microsoft received 75,000 SLES licenses. From Microsoft? The Direct2Dell blog confirms that indeed Dell will buy the certificates from Microsoft, not from Novell. Why? Why not directly from Novell?

How secure are Linux, Window and Mac OS?

Filed under
Security How secure is your favorite operating system? In a time where OS fanatics battle each other on what OS is the best, security is often one of the turning points of discussion. In this article I will be comparing the vulnerabilities listed on Secunia and assessing how serious they are.

Also: What about Linux spyware?

Red Hat, red hat, RED HAT

Filed under

  • Summit 2007: The calm before the storm

  • Overheard at the Red Hat Summit
  • Xerox SA switches to Red Hat on Dell
  • Talking security with Red Hat's Mark Cox
  • Redhat securely mount remote Linux file system using SSHFS
  • Red Hat Summit 2007 opens strong
  • Red Hat Summit: "The Desktop Paradigm is Dead"
  • Red Hat CEO Dismisses Novell, Ubuntu Threats
  • Summit 2007: Day zero, blog two
  • Red Hat Summit: ...But They'll Sell a Desktop Anyway
  • Red Hat's New Global Desktop Is Ready to Run
  • Red Hat Rolls at Home And Abroad

Linux Still a Hit in China

Filed under
Linux A new report from Beijing-based CCID Consulting pegs Linux operating sales revenues up by nearly 31 percent in the first quarter of 2007 to 31 million Yuan (just over US$4 million), as compared to the same period a year prior.

Red Hat boss claims digital divide contributes to terrorism

Filed under

ZDNet: The first keynote of the Red Hat conference here in San Diego kicked off with a passionate speech from chief executive Matthew Szulik who asserted that some of the blame for the terrorist threat that many developed nations are facing, lies with the fact many developing countries have been left behind when it comes to the digital revolution – particularly when it comes to education.

Also: Learning as easy as pie

A firefox hack you can live without

Filed under

webworkerdaily: Vancouver-based developer Doug Schmidt has come up with one of the silliest (yet most amusing) browser hacks to come down the pike in a while: DryerFox.

Open-source wants open-wheel exposure

Filed under

indystar: It's not just big companies, with their household names and logos and equally big advertising budgets, that sponsor cars in the Indianapolis 500. Ordinary geeks do it, too.

Ahead of the Bell: Red Hat

Filed under
Linux Red Hat Inc.'s analyst day on Wednesday may be a chance for the budding Linux provider to swing the sentiment on Wall Street after recently posting disappointing fiscal fourth-quarter results.

Also: IBM and Red Hat Announce Worldwide Enterprise Linux-On-Mainframe Program
And: Red Hat to build 'Online Desktop'

Extending Turning into a document conversion tool

Filed under
HowTos One of the less well-known features of is its ability to run as a service. You can put that ability to some clever use. For example, you can turn OpenOffice.og into a conversion engine and use it to convert documents from one format to another via a Web-based interface or a command-line tool. JODConverter can help you to unleash's file conversion capabilities.

Yoper vs Arch vs Slick vs openSUSE

Filed under

Open Source Toolbox: SML has Published an interesting review of Yoper 3 Beta (in Hebrew), in which he measured boot time and application start time across Yoper, Arch Linux, Slick (retired?) and openSUSE.

Linux: Large IO Commands

Filed under

kernelTRAP: Some people complain that Linux doesn't support really large IO commands. The main reason why we do not support infinitely sized IO is that we need to allocate a scatterlist to fill these elements into for dma mapping.

Also: Linux: Merging lguest

Google vs. Microsoft Office? NO: vs. Open Office (.org)!

Filed under

Donna Bogatin (ZDNet blogs): If we take Google CEO Eric Schmidt at his public words, Microsoft Office is welcome at the Google Apps table. But what about

Review: Elisa media center

Filed under
Software Fluendo's Elisa is a free software media center application that can play your DVDs, video files, music, and pictures. Since it is designed for extensibility, Elisa has the potential to do much more. It does not handle television or video recording functions, but it is a slick and promising project.

The simplest way to make databases in

Filed under

Free Software Mag: Do you need to make a database, but fear it’s too much of a pain or you don’t have the right tools? Don’t worry: it’s easy, free, and useful, too. Use the free office suite to get your data in shape for mail merges, queries, or useful analysis of your business data.

Linux is not Windows Lite

Filed under

Paul Murphy: I've said elsewhere, linux is not Windows and efforts to make it so are doomed to fail. Nobody gets to be a leader by following, and neither OpenOffice nor Linux are going to beat Microsoft at being Microsoft.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • i2pd 2.10 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses. I2P client is a software used for building and using anonymous I2P networks. Such networks are commonly used for anonymous peer-to-peer applications (filesharing, cryptocurrencies) and anonymous client-server applications (websites, instant messengers, chat-servers). I2P allows people from all around the world to communicate and share information without restrictions.
  • Pixeluvo Review | Photo Editor for Linux & Windows
    A review of Pixeluvo, a great photo editor available on Linux and Windows. Pixeluvo is not free or open source.
  • Blit, A Retrospective On My Largest Project Ever
    I’ve always been someone who’s liked art and programming. Especially combining the two. One of my favorite genres is pixel art, or sprites as they are also known. I’ve dabbled in making a few other art programs before, but nothing like this. Originally Blit supposed to be only a sprite animation tool that had a modern look and feel, but my ideas for it grew greater (*sigh* feature creep). There are many other sprinting tools out there like GrafX2, Aseprite, (and other 2D animation programs like TVPaint). I’m not saying that it’s wrong that they make their own GUI toolkit, but it feels kind of odd. I really wanted to bring these types of programs out of the days of the Amiga. After doing some initial research, I settled on using Qt.
  • An alert on the upcoming 7.51.0 release
    In two weeks time, on Wednesday November 2nd, we will release curl and libcurl 7.51.0 unless something earth shattering happens.
  • Desktop Gmail Client `WMail` 2.0.0 Stable Released
    WMail is a free, open source desktop client for Gmail and Google Inbox, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
  • SpaceView: Ubuntu File System Usage Indicator
  • FunYahoo++: New Yahoo Messenger Plugin For Pidgin / libpurple [PPA]
    Yahoo retired its old Messenger protocol in favor of a new one, breaking compatibility with third-party applications, such as Pidgin, Empathy, and so on. Eion Robb, the SkypeWeb and Hangouts developer, has created a replacement Yahoo prpl plugin, called FunYahoo++, that works with the new Yahoo Messenger protocol. Note that I tested the plugin with Pidgin, but it should work with other instant messaging applications that support libpurple, like BitlBee or Empathy.
  • GCC Lands Loop Splitting Optimization
    The latest GCC 7 development code has an optimization pass now for loop splitting.
  • GCC 7 To End Feature Development Next Month
    Friday's GCC 7 status report indicates the feature freeze is coming up in just a few weeks. Red Hat developer Jakub Jelinek wrote in the latest status report, "Trunk which will eventually become GCC 7 is still in Stage 1 but its end is near and we are planning to transition into Stage 3 starting Nov 13th end of day time zone of your choice. This means it is time to get things you want to have in GCC 7 finalized and reviewed. As usual there may be exceptions to late reviewed features but don't count on that. Likewise target specific features can sneak in during Stage 3 if maintainers ok them."
  • GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') released [stable]
    GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.
  • GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset released
    GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset has been released !
  • guile-ncurses 2.0 released
    I am pleased to announce the release of guile-ncurses 2.0 guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is a wrapper to the ncurses TUI library. It contains some basic text display and keyboard and mouse input functionality, as well as a menu widget and a form widget. It also has lower level terminfo and termios functionality.
  • Unifont 9.0.03 Released
    Unifont 9.0.03 is released. The main changes are the addition of the Pikto and Tonal ConScript Unicode Registry scripts.
  • PATHspider 1.0.0 released!
    In today’s Internet we see an increasing deployment of middleboxes. While middleboxes provide in-network functionality that is necessary to keep networks manageable and economically viable, any packet mangling — whether essential for the needed functionality or accidental as an unwanted side effect — makes it more and more difficult to deploy new protocols or extensions of existing protocols. For the evolution of the protocol stack, it is important to know which network impairments exist and potentially need to be worked around. While classical network measurement tools are often focused on absolute performance values, PATHspider performs A/B testing between two different protocols or different protocol extensions to perform controlled experiments of protocol-dependent connectivity problems as well as differential treatment.
  • The Domain Name System

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • Happy 20th birthday, KDE!
    KDE turned twenty recently, which seems significant in a world that seems to change so fast. Yet somehow we stay relevant, and excited to continue to build a better future. Lydia asked recently on the KDE-Community list what we were most proud of.
  • SETI – Week of Information Technology
  • KDevelop for Windows available on Chocolatey now
    Which is already great in itself! But now it's also possible to install it via the super popular Windows package manager for Windows, Chocolatey.
  • colord-kde 0.5.0 released!
    Last official stable release was done more than 3 years ago, it was based on Qt/KDE 4 tech, after that a few fixes got in what would be 0.4.0 but as I needed to change my priorities it was never released. Thanks to Lukáš Tinkl it was ported to KF5, on his port he increased the version number to 0.5.0, still without a proper release distros rely on a git checkout.
  • Call for attendees Lakademy 2017
    As many of you know, since 2012 we organize the Lakademy, a sort of Latin American Akademy. The event brings together KDE Latin American contributors in hacking sessions to work on their projects, promo meetings to think KDE dissemination strategies in the region and other activities.
  • Plasma 5 Desktop on FreeBSD Branding
    The FreeBSD packages of KDE software — the KDE 4 desktop, and soon KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications — have traditionally been shipped pretty much as delivered from the upstream source. We compile, we package, and there is very little customization we do as a “distro”. The KDE 4 packages came with a default wallpaper that was a smidgen different from the one shipped with several Linux distro’s. I think Ivan Cukic did that artwork originally. For Plasma 5 Desktop, we also wanted to do a tiny bit of branding — just the default wallpaper for new users, mind.
  • A bit on Tooling
    So on the weekend I also worked on updating Qt 5.6.1 to Qt 5.6.2 on FreeBSD, which involves using new and scary tools as well. Power tools, they can be really useful, or they can take off a finger if you’re not careful. In this case it was Phabricator, which is also used in KDE — but not everywhere in KDE. For FreeBSD, the tool is used to review updates to ports (the packaging instructions), so I did an update of Qt from 5.6.1 to 5.6.2 and we handled the review through FreeBSD’s Phab. The ports infrastructure is stored in SVN, so the review is relatively straightforward: update the ports-tree checkout, apply your changes, use arc to create or update a review request. I was amazed by how painless it was — somehow I’d been frightened. Using the tool once, properly, makes a big difference in self-confidence.
  • Krita 3.1 second beta.
    The Krita 3.1 beta come with a full features and fixes. The linux version to download your krita-3.0.91-x86_64.appimage.
  • Second Beta for Krita 3.1 Available
    We’re still fixing bugs like madmen… And working on some cool new features as well, but that’s for a later release. In any case, here is the second Krita 3.1 beta! Yes, you’re reading that correctly. Originally, we had planned to use 3.0.2 as the version for this release, but there is so much news in it that it merits a bigger version bump.


  • Consequences of the HACK CAMP 2016 FEDORA + GNOME
    I used to do install parties in order to promote the use of FEDORA and GNOME project since five years ago. As you can see more details in the Release Party FEDORA 17 for Fedora, and Linux Camp 2012, GNOME PERU 2013, GNOME PERU 2014...
  • GNOME Shell Making It Easy To Launch Apps/Games For Optimus / Dual GPU Systems
    With the GNOME 3.24 desktop that's currently in development the latest GNOME Shell code has support for easily letting the user launch an app on a dedicated GPU when applicable for handling NVIDIA Optimus use-cases of having integrated and discrete GPU laptops. When a dual-GPU system is detected, a menu item will be added to opt for "Launch using Dedicated Graphics Card", per this commit. The GNOME Shell change for supporting discrete GPUs was made and when the user opts to launch on the dedicated GPU, the DRI_PRIME=1 environment variable will automatically be set for that new program/game.