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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat introduces business resource planner for enterprises Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:48am
Story Fedora 22 Is an Excellent Choice for Running Linux in the Cloud Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:37am
Story Intel Compute Stick now available: $149 for Windows version, $110 for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:23am
Story Why Ubuntu Keeps the Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:09am
Story ONLYOFFICE Document Server 3.0 Release and Other News for Open Source Community Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:07am
Story Cortex-A9 Sitara EVM gains Android KitKat BSP Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:50pm
Story GIMP's Porting To GTK3 Continues Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:42pm
Story Eight Ways to Use Open Source for More Effective Data Protection Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:39pm
Story The NHS must embrace open source to improve Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Is OpenOffice Dying? Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:28pm

Is cloud computing a threat to open source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: Why the demise of proprietary software is creating a vacuum which is about to be filled... and we may not like it.

Android 1.5 "Early Look" SDK available

h-online.com: The Google Android Developers have announced the release of an "early look" of the Software Development Kit (SDK) for Android version 1.5. The new SDK provides a preview of the cupcake branch of the open source mobile platform and is based on the 2.6.27 Linux kernel.

Cooliris Now Available for Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Truth be told, I'm not sure I really get Cooliris, the browser plugin designed to enhance your photo and video browsing experience. Don't get me wrong, it's really cool, and fun, and now that it is officially available for Linux, I've spent way too much time fiddling around with it.

Book Review: Beginning Ubuntu LTS Server Administration

Filed under
Ubuntu

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Beginning Ubuntu LTS Server Administration From Novice to Professional aims to teach all you need to know to begin administering Ubuntu Server. The book covers installing, configuring and the systems administration tasks for Ubuntu Server Edition.

Your Distro is Insecure: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-mag.com: Ubuntu Server has one of the cleanest and easiest Linux distribution installers. However, in many cases, its designers choose to ignore security in favor of ease-of-use. The result? An install that is not secure by default.

Parsing the nuances of OS decisions

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: Perhaps the headline should be that Vista, Windows 7 and OS X are in decline—for Ubuntu.

SME Server: The Linux solution for growing businesses

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: f you’re running a small business and you’re in the market for server, you might want to consider SME Server, a Linux distribution customised specifically for the small and medium sized business environment.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • People of openSUSE: jean-daniel-dodin

  • Firewall Builder: an interview with Vadim Kurland
  • Open Source and Cloud: A Curse or Blessing
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Server Edition: What to Expect
  • Debian Lenny, Mighty Debian
  • Ubuntu 9.04 'Jaunty Jackalope' release on April 23
  • April tribute to the Fedora Project art team
  • Smolt in Mandriva
  • Will Linux overtake Windows on netbooks?
  • Bug Tracker Helps Mop Up Linux Kernel
  • Linux Foundation puts work into groups
  • Panelists ponder the kernel at Linux Collaboration Summit
  • Benchmarking On Fedora Is Very Easy
  • Driving Linux-based Benchmarking With Sandtorg
  • Grabbing Steaming Audio
  • Sacred: Gold Edition Available
  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 1
  • Ubuntu Wastes My Time and Money
  • Microsoft: Sorry, you can't use these vouchers to learn Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Scheduling Commands with crontab

  • Manage Sony Reader in Linux
  • Surveillance video under Linux using ZoneMinder
  • How to block DDOS attacks in Linux
  • Dodge the challenges of a dual-head display setup with Fedora 10
  • Death to Processes
  • Compiling Perl into Binary Code
  • How to add a directory to the path
  • Debian Lenny AMD64 Install Tutorial
  • Ubuntu 9.04: Installing Landscape on the Server
  • KVM in Ubuntu - Setup and Virtual Machine Creation Guide

Enter gNewSense - the free Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: The project gNewSense started with the goal of creating a GNU/Linux distribution whose first priority is users’ freedom - even if this limits user comfort and hardware support. As a starting point Ubuntu’s operating system is used.

Firefox Extensions Guide

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Extensions Guide: Extend Your Experience

  • 15 Firefox add-ons for Web developers
  • Lifehacker's Favorite Firefox Extensions--Plus a Few of Our Own
  • Firefox New Tab: Visual Update

What Price Cool? Mac vs. PC

Filed under
OS

pcmag.com: There are two major platforms: Apple and Windows, and Macs generally cost more than PCs. Thus ends the latest propagandistic report. But what about Linux?

My PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Desktop

Filed under
PCLOS

penguiniplanetblog.blogspot: Not too long ago PCLinuxOS released two versions of the PCLOS 2009 distribution. One uses KDE 3.5, the Other uses Gnome 2.24.3. So, I was faced with a decision. Which would I choose?

3 Easy Ways to Test-Drive Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Microsoft wants you to believe that their products are all you should ever have. Apple has been around as long as Microsoft, and are known for making elegant, stylish, user-friendly computers and other products. There is a third option, and that is the one that I prefer-- nice friendly, stout Linux desktop systems.

Distro Review - Arch Linux 2009.02

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: The Arch fans are always really passionate and enthusiastic in describing it to me; so I figured it was high time I found out for myself. After many broken promises and much procrastination, I finally made it onto Arch Linux and that’s where I’ve been for the past couple of weeks now.

N280 netbook has optional TV tuner

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: MSI has announced a netbook that uses Intel's 1.66GHz Atom N280 processor and offers an optional TV tuner. The "Wind U123" has a 10-inch display, 80GB, 120GB, or 160GB hard disk drives, "EasyFace" security software, and available HSDPA.

Browser wars 2009: Firefox, Chrome, & Internet Explorer

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

blogs.computerworld: Over the last weeks, I've been working a lot with all three of the major Web browsers, and I've come to some conclusions.

Review: Sandisk Sansa Clip w/ Linux

Filed under
Hardware

montanalinux.org: I have always wanted a good quality audio player that works well with Linux and plays Ogg Vorbis files. Even though the Sansa Clip was originally released in 2007, I somehow missed it.

10 Expert Ubuntu Tricks

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

pcworld.com: Recently I started work on a new Ubuntu tips book that will partner my existing title, Ubuntu Kung Fu. The new book is still being planned and won't be published until next year, but I thought I'd share 10 tips that are on my list to be included.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.