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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Planetary Annihilation begins its Linux onslaught! srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 7:16pm
Story Review: Zorin OS 7 Core srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 6:44pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 4:46pm
Story Mir Will Have Legacy Driver Support srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 4:38pm
Story Super Test – RSS feed readers srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 2:24am
Story Linux Extremism: Puts a Hurt on Linux and Nothing Else srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 2:23am
Story GNOME Files 3.9.3 Release srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 2:21am
Story Linux continues to rule supercomputers srlinuxx 19/06/2013 - 1:16am
Story Free and Commercial Game Engines srlinuxx 18/06/2013 - 11:43pm
Story Anne Nicolas: Mageia project is a viable and mature srlinuxx 18/06/2013 - 11:41pm

My Linux Broke -- Is It My Fault?

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: One of the adages about Linux that gets passed around a lot goes something like, "It's a great system, but you really have to know what you're doing.” The other day, I got a firsthand example of that -- I got bitten by a bug in a package that's readily available in Ubuntu's software repository.

Thunderbird New Mail Notifier

Filed under
Moz/FF

movingtofreedom.org: When I switched to using Mozilla Thunderbird on Ubuntu GNU/Linux, it was a very easy switch, but I missed my little tray notifier. So I was pleased recently to find the Mozilla New Mail Icon extension, or, “Biff”.

Linux Compatible Hardware has a Market

Filed under
Hardware

nosrednaekim.wordpress: After about 5 minutes of searching I found this card, a TRENDnet TEW-443. Reading the reviews, I realized I needn’t have bothered with the ubuntu compatibility page. Over half of the reviews were from people with Linux who had bought it because it was Linux compatible.

NASA administrator Griffin predicts humans on Mars by 2037

Filed under
Sci/Tech

iTWire: At the 58th International Aeronautical Congress (IAC-2007), being held from September 24-28, 2007, NASA administrator Michael Griffin says “Our long-term game-plan is to put man on Mars by 2037”

TuxGames.com makes repository for Loki goodness

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: With the demise of many pages for old Loki Games software, TuxGames.com has posted up a repository containing the demo's and a updates for the ageing games.

some howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing A Linux Distro to An USB Drive

  • Configuring ndiswrapper in SLED
  • How-To Recover password under Ubuntu
  • How to: Upgrade VMWARE Server under Linux
  • Taking notes with Tomboy

How worried should Microsoft be about open source?

Filed under
Microsoft

zdnet blogs: It may well be true that desktop Linux is going nowhere fast in the U.S. Microsoft’s willingness to let users back-off upgrades and stick with XP may have stopped the potential rot in its market share. But it is taking enormous effort for Microsoft to hold its server market share against Linux’ inroads in the enterprise.

Also: The Microsoft millstone around our necks
And: Revised WinXP policy dooms Linux desktop prospects without real OEM marketing efforts

Red Hat Reports Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2008 Results

Filed under
Linux

tradingmarkets.com: Red Hat today announced financial results for its second fiscal quarter ended August 31, 2007. Total revenue for the quarter was $127.3 million, an increase of 28% from the year ago quarter and 7% from the prior quarter.

Also: Red Hat Appoints Two New Financial Executives

The state of Linux

Filed under
Linux

blog-of-gentoo: We often talk about how Linux is ready (or not), it's on Desktop (I even wrote a peace about that as well), or on server, and how its better than Windows because ....... (fill in your favorite), and how its more open than MacOS, etc. What I'm saying, its this: Linux is ( and already for some time) ready.

KDE 4 beta 3 delayed one week

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: It has just been decided that the Beta 3 will be out one week latet than originally planned. This is mainly due to some changes in how plasma work that we'd like to see in the new Beta.

First US GPL case is not settled

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Contrary to yesterday's report, the lawsuit against Monsoon Multimedia for violating the GNU General Public License (GPL) in its distribution of BusyBox may not be headed for a quick settlement. Nor will the settlement necessarily be out-of-court.

Kind of fond of FaunOS

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: FaunOS offers a full KDE desktop system with a comprehensive set of applications as either a live DVD or a live USB flash drive. The USB format is the distro's primary focus. FaunOS is based upon Arch Linux, and ships with Arch's package management system. The more I tested FaunOS, the more impressed I was.

How to change boot order of Ubuntu and Windows

Filed under
HowTos

mathijs.jurresip.nl: This is for people who have a dual boot installation of Ubuntu and Window (XP or Vista). If you want to change the default OS or change the order in which the present OSes are listed, this is what you do…

Kernel Markers Aiming for 2.6.24

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Mathieu Desnoyers posted an updated version of his Linux Kernel Markers patchset explaining, "following Christoph Hellwig's suggestion, aiming at a Linux Kernel Markers inclusion for 2.6.24, I made a simplified version of the Linux Kernel Markers."

Also: 2.6.23-rc8, "Getting Close"

The best desktop Linux for Windows users: Xandros 4

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: What's the best desktop Linux? For me, it's SimplyMEPIS 6.5, soon to be replaced by 7.0. But this is both a dumb question and a dumb answer. The real question is what is the best desktop operating system for you?

Installing Debian, XP and… Windows Vista in Vmware

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: In the first part of this article (Vmware Server Console - Introduction to Virtualization) learned how to set up Vmware for a LiveCD system. Now I’m going to show you how to install Debian, Windows XP and… Windows Vista under Vmware.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: 1-CD Installation & Multimedia support

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: openSUSE 10.3 has seen a lot of changes with the media selection; the most prominent one being the new 1-CD installation for KDE, and 1-CD installtion for GNOME. Multimedia support in the distribution has also been improved, with MP3 support out-of-the-box for Banshee and Amarok. Today we bring you a special double-bill covering these two stories, and we’ll be talking to Michael Loeffler, the Product Manager of openSUSE, to give us a little more insight.

Install Gentoo Portage on non-Gentoo Distribution

Filed under
HowTos

xanda.org: Requires Python >= 2.2.x and Development Packages (gcc, binutils, automake, autoconf, libtool, gawk, mawk, bison). Make sure your current distro installed with above packages. If not, use apt-get or yum to install it. Make sure you have enough space in /.

I Now Recommend PCLinuxOS & DreamLinux

Filed under
Linux

stephencuyos.com: Two weeks ago I facilitated a five-day workshop on Linux. The participants found PCLinuxOS to be the easiest to use, DreamLinux as the most beautiful, and Ubuntu as the hardest to master.

Linux DDR3 Synthetic Benchmarks

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: We have several DDR3 related articles in the works, but in this article we will be looking just at the DDR3 system memory performance in the RAMspeed synthetic benchmark under Linux. The DDR3 memory we'll be using is the OCZ DDR3-1333 2GB Gold Kit with a part number of OCZ3G13332GK.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more