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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Secure email servers from scratch with FreeBSD 6 (Part 2)

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HowTos

In the last article we parted ways after configuring a base FreeBSD system, enabling it with upgrades via cvsup and portsupgrade, and securing it with a simple ipfw2 firewall. The previous article created a solid foundation which this article will build on, covering the configuration of Postfix, amavisd-new, ClamAV, SpamAssassin, MySQL and finally SquirrelMail for web mail. The final setup will have all the bells and whistles of a high end-mail setup.

Debian: server yes, desktop no

Filed under
Linux

I recently decided to retire Red Hat 7 after seven years of loyal service as a firewall/router-OS on my home LAN. Like a red-headed stepchild grown old, it had become cranky from extended neglect, and no longer would even shutdown or reboot without issuing nasty messages. So, after downloading/burning the latest Debian 3.1 R4 net install CD, I popped it into the K6 box's CD drive and booted her up.

Tip of the Trade: Recovery Is Possible

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Linux

Recovery is Possible (RIP) sounds like a 12-step program, or some kind of self-help regime. RIP is (yet another) specialized Linux rescue distribution. RIP is for experienced admins who do not need a lot of handholding, or all the bells and whistles of a Jabba-sized live CD Linux, like Knoppix.

Book Review: PHP and MySQL by Example

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Reviews

You can't really call it the Holy Trinity of open source because there are four of them, but Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP, also known as LAMP, are what Free and Open Source software world revolves around. If you want to learn PHP quickly and efficiently, Ellie Quigley's book is the one to pick up.

A first look at Firefox 3.0

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Moz/FF

Mozilla has officially released the first public alpha build of Firefox 3.0. Codenamed Gran Paradiso, Firefox 3 includes the new Gecko 1.9 rendering engine which leverages the open source Cairo rendering framework and features heavily refactored reflow algorithms that improve Firefox layout functionality and resolve some long-standing CSS bugs.

A Review: A week with KDE Applications, Round 1

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KDE

I like many love KDE, but like many I’ve also complained about most of the KDE apps. Personally i loathe the naming of most Linux apps. It’s gnu this and K that and gtk this and qt that. Overall i just want nice look and feel. For a week, I’ve dedicated myself to KDE applications in their native environment.

My own private Microsoft-Novell survey

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SUSE

Shockingly (Shockingly!!!) a Microsoft-Novell-commissioned survey reports that the world would end tomorrow but for the pact. Never mind, as Matthew Aslett notes, that one-third of the respondents had never even heard of the deal.

Developing KDE 4 Inside a KDE 3 Session

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HowTos

When I started to get a full blown KDE 4 environment running, I found it very inconvenient to constantly switch screens. On the other hand, Xnest was not bearable. Lucky enough, there is Xephyr.

one laptop + video conferencing = hotness

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OLPC

Robert McQueen has posted a web log entry about getting video teleconferencing from the OLPC XO machine. This is pretty damn hot and I’m very excited about it. It basically sells itself.

How cool would it be to be able to video conference from a laptop that only costs around $100 or so?

More Here.

Configuration: the forgotten side of security

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Security
HowTos

When the average computer user thinks about security, they usually think about reactive measures like anti-virus programs or security patches -- responses to a specific threat. A more efficient approach is to configure a system securely from the start.

Mother of Hans Reiser testifies during preliminary hearing today

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Reiser

Palmer testified during a preliminary hearing in Alameda County Superior Court in Oakland for Hans Reiser, 42, charged with murdering his estranged wife. Says son never called anyone about wife's disappearance.

Open Addict is having a Hardware Contest

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Hardware

Ok guys and gals, the underground Open Addict office mega-complex is being overwhelmed with spare hardware. Well, not really but I've got some spare stuff that I'd like to give away. What better way to do it than hold a (insert radio announcer voice) December Spare Hardware Giveaway(tm)!!

How to use Konqueror as an FTP client on KDE

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HowTos

Several FTP clients for KDE have been either discontinued or their development has been stalled. But the good news is that the most famous FTP client is under constant development and its name is Konqueror. Using Konqueror as an FTP client is a good idea because you can have remote files inside your file manager, as if your files were on your HDD.

Getting Text out of Other File Formats

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HowTos

A common problem is that you receive a file in a format that you cannot easily read because you don’t have an appropriate application. The most common case of this problem is that you want to retrieve the text from a Microsoft Word file. It’s not always obvious how to retrieve the text.

Password Management Concerns with IE and Firefox

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Security

This two-part paper presents an analysis of the security mechanisms, risks, attacks, and defenses of the two most commonly used password management systems for web browsers, found in Internet Explorer and Firefox.

Review: Mandriva Flash delivers Linux to go

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MDV
Reviews

Mandriva Flash is a 2GB Dane-Elec USB key loaded with Mandriva Linux 2007. It gets points for style: the key is an attractive deep blue surrounded by a sturdy metal fence that leaves room on both ends to attach the key to a lanyard or keychain. The release notes say that the operating system and related files only take up half the space on the USB drive, leaving 1GB for my own files. This little powerhouse packs a lot of punch, once you get it up and running.

Unix maintenance costs spur Ohio EPA's Linux adoption

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Linux

As a state run agency, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency couldn't afford a drastic increase in maintenance costs for its data center. So it was with the aim of saving money that Holler forged a testing and development relationship with Red Hat Inc. in 2003.

Ubuntu reflects current state of Linux art

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Ubuntu

The month of October has been, at least to this writer, one of discovery. The technical one was by far the easier of the two: changing Linux distributions. I ended up installing a version of Ubuntu.

Isolate and resolve memory leaks using MALLOCDEBUG on AIX Version 5.3

Filed under
Linux

Memory leaks can be tough and costly problems to solve, so it makes sense to use good tools to clearly point out and understand where the leaks are coming from. This article outlines an approach you can use while tackling memory leaks, and it discusses how to take advantage of the MALLOCDEBUG tool that is supplied with AIX.

How to gracefully reboot your Ubuntu/Debian system if all else fails

Filed under
HowTos

There you are, staring at a crashed Gnome session, CTRL-ALT-BKSPC does nothing. ALT-CTRL-F1 won’t bring you to a terminal where you could cd to /etc/init.d and restart gdm. In short, your choices seem to be limited to holding down the power button and chancing file system corruption or nothing. But wait!

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.

Hadoop and Spark

Openwashing