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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jolicloud 1.1 - Very good, but impolite srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 8:47pm
Story Humble Bundle #2 Breaches $900k, On Way To $1M USD srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 8:45pm
Story Developer defends claims of backdoors in OpenBSD srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 6:00pm
Story Opera 11 Benchmarked srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 5:56pm
Story Pimp My PIM! srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 5:51pm
Story Realtek gigabit network performance in Linux sucks srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 5:49pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 5:22am
Story 5 Notes-Taking Applications for Linux Chris7mas 18/12/2010 - 4:33am
Story New EU Software Rules Give FOSS the Inside Track srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 12:43am
Story Valve's Alien Swarm Game For Linux? srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 12:40am

Best Open Source CMS Final Five Announced!

After six weeks and registering almost twelve thousand nominations, the Open Source CMS Award finalists have been revealed.

Get your network's weather from Weathermap4RRD

Filed under
Software

When I was investigating the Abilene/Internet2 network sometime back, I found its "network weather map," which graphically shows the load on network segments, to be an interesting tool. I thought something similar could be helpful on our network. Today, we're using Weathermap4RRD to show a high-level graphical representation of our network.

Book Review : Beginning Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax

Filed under
Reviews

Ask me what is one of the most useful feature on the net which will remain popular for times immemorial, come what may, and I will without an iota of doubt tell you that it is maps. A one of a kind book I have come across in recent times is the Google Maps Applications with PHP and Ajax from Novice to Professional.

Linux Newbies - Finding your way around your hard drive

Filed under
HowTos

So you’ve got yourself a fancy Linux install now and you want to know a bit more about your hard drive? Here are a few simple commands that can show you what you have, and where it is.

ComputerWorld Gets OSS Mud on its Face?

Filed under
OSS

Articles like this one are so misguided. ComputerWorld shows mud on its face while pretending they're subject matter experts. I'll show you below how this article was written by a ignorant journalist.

The Challenges of Open Source in Non-Profits

Filed under
OSS

Open source seems to present a number of obstacles to those making technical purchasing decisions in those businesses that are classified non-profit. The interesting facet of this discussion, however, is that the same business needs exist in not-for-profit institutions as it does in for-profit ones. This article attempts to survey some of those issues facing open source in the not-for-profit sector of the business world.

Half a century of hard drives

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives radically changed the way the world stores data. Hard drives have come a long way since debuting 50 years ago this week. Do they still have room to shrink?

Debian Etch is not ready for release

Filed under
Linux

I'm scared by Debian etch. It'll probably become the worst Debian release ever. It's going to hurt our reputation.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth is polishing his image: Reuter's has a story which says «Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft», and Mark's own blog addresses the Debian/Ubuntu conflictual relationship: «Conflicting goals create tension in communities». I couldn't possibly trust these sayings.

Moving to freedom, one step at a time

Filed under
Linux

Time to get on with the move. Giving up Windows is like kicking a drug habit. It’s easier to take the path of least resistance and keep using. If quitting proprietary software was a twelve step program—although, let’s not push the analogy too far.

Debian Etch Beta3 Graphical-mode installation With screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Etch is the codename for the upcoming release of Debian, which will also be known as Debian GNU/Linux 4.0. Etch has been the testing “release” of the Debian distribution since the release of the current stable version, 3.1 (codenamed Sarge), on June 6th 2005. The project is currently aiming at a December 4 2006 release date.I have created easy debian etch installation process with nearly 50 images.You need to click on thumbnail image to view full image size.

Xgl and Compiz bling for Dapper

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

By now, if you haven't seen Compiz and Xgl in action, you probably have heard of it. You may even be wanting to set it up yourself. If so, this guide is here for you.

Embracing Unix and Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

Unix and Linux clients can do quite well on a Windows network. Microsoft, in fact, released its own Services for Unix, which provides some basic cross-compatibility features for Unix clients accessing Windows servers. Other, more robust interoperability solutions are also available for various network services. Fortunately, Unix has been using TCP/IP for longer than Windows, so the two operating systems at least have a networking protocol in common.

Computing systems for business: Linux or Mac?

Filed under
OS

Is there an alternative for original Microsoft Windows to substitute the pirated Microsoft Windows and Office on your office computers?

Hire company charges ahead with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Kennards Hire is ready to replace Windows server with Linux at 90 branches, to accompany 400 desktops already running the open source operating system.

CLI Magic: Kismet sniffs out Wi-Fi access

Filed under
HowTos

Today, Wi-Fi access points everywhere, and users becoming increasingly more sophisticated in their wireless network knowledge. One good tool for discovering Wi-Fi access points is a command-line utility called Kismet. It can help with a range of issues, from diagnosing Wi-Fi interference problems to finding a particular network in a sea of airborne bits.

Microsoft will always beat Open Source

Filed under
OSS

OPEN SOURCE will always be a poor cousin to Microsoft, according to a report by boffins at Harvard Business School.

Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

South African magnate Mark Shuttleworth has already conquered space. Now he's set his sights on cyberspace where he hopes to challenge Microsoft.

An even better BitTorrent client for Linux!

Filed under
Software

Well, after all the problems with Transmission and popular trackers like OiNK and Demonoid I decided to try something else. I tried out Tribler, but it wasn't that good, so after snooping around the Ubuntu forums I found about this relatively new client called qBittorrent.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenStack Roundup

  • OpenStack Summit Returns to Austin With Much Fanfare
    Back in July 2010, 75 developers gathered at the Omni hotel here for the very first OpenStack Summit. At the time, OpenStack was in the earliest stages of development. In April 2016, OpenStack returned to Austin in triumph as the de facto standard for private cloud deployment and the platform of choice for a significant share of the Fortune 100 companies. About 7,500 people from companies of all sizes from all over the world attended the 2016 OpenStack Summit in Austin from April 25 to April 29. In 2010, there were no users, because there wasn't much code running, but in 2016, that has changed. Among the many OpenStack users speaking at the summit were executives from Verizon and Volkswagen Group. While the genesis of OpenStack was a joint effort between NASA and Rackspace, the 2016 summit was sponsored by some of the biggest names in technology today—including IBM, Cisco, Dell, EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some highlights of the 2016 OpenStack Summit.
  • A Look Into IBM's OpenStack Meritocracy
    Angel Diaz, IBM vice president of Cloud Architecture and Technology, discusses how Big Blue has earned its place in the OpenStack community.
  • OpenStack cloud’s “killer use case”: Telcos and NFV
    Today, 114 petabytes of data traverse AT&T's network daily, and the carrier predicts a 10x increase in traffic by 2020. To help manage this, AT&T is transitioning from purpose-built appliances to white boxes running open source software. And according to AT&T Senior Vice President of Software Development and Engineering Sarabh Saxena, OpenStack has been a key part of this shift.

Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend. Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing

Yes we skip 10.2 for 10.3 since was FreeBSD 10.3 was coming we thought we should wait for 10.3. This is the first ALPHA development release for testing and debugging for GhostBSD 10.3, only as MATE been released yet which is available on SourceForge and for the amd64 and i386 architectures. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.