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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 26 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Fears of Windows Lock-out Here Now Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 9:06am
Story Linux-based COMs gain WiFi AP and BLE 4.1 functions Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 9:02am
Story 4 reasons why people should stop associating open source with a lack of security Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 4:01am
Story KWinception Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:45am
Story Some cool Plasma tips and tricks Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:42am
Story GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.16.0 Released Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:40am
Story Fedora 22 Alpha Gnome Edition : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:32am
Story More eBPF Tracing Work Being Readied For Linux 4.1 Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:26am
Story 2015 – The Year Of The GNU/Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:18am
Story Ubuntu MATE 14.04.2 LTS Officially Released with Backported Features from Ubuntu MATE 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 12:01am

KDE 4.2.1 provides the "Cream" on top of KDE

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: It has been a little more than a month since you were able to install the latest and greatest KDE on release day. Today is another one of those with KDE 4.2.1 (codenamed "Cream") hitting the shelves.

Looking back at Linux.com

Filed under
Linux
Web

brucebyfield.wordpress: Quite simply, the old Linux.com site and its sister-site NewsForge were the largest source of original news in the FOSS community. That is not just bias, but objective fact. Mny people don’t seem to recognize what’s been lost.

Also: Journey to the New Linux.com

Bad update! BAD!

Filed under
SUSE

marcelgagne.com: On Monday evening, just before calling it a night, I decided to attend to that little 'updates available my OpenSUSE 11.1 notebook. There were half a dozen updates, one of them being a kernel update, which doesn't happen too often.

Firefox 3 Gains Ground on Microsoft Internet Explorer

Filed under
Moz/FF

sys-con.com: Mozilla Firefox 3 overtook Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 6 for the first time in February in the Internet browser wars according to monthly data from StatCounter Global Stats.

Red Hat's JBoss Software Draws Patent Suit

Filed under
Legal

informationweek.com: A small software company on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against open source distributor Red Hat and several vendors that sell Red Hat products, claiming that Red Hat's JBoss middleware violates one of its patents.

The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 2: Installation

Filed under
Linux

maximumpc.com: In part one of our guide, we walked you through the process of finding a distro that is right for you. This chapter is going to walk you through downloading and burning a CD image of your chosen distro(s), the traditional way of partitioning and setting up a dual-boot system, and another way to dual-boot without repartitioning.

Dream Linux 3.5 - An Excellent New Release

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet/blog: I got interested in the new release of Dream Linux (3.5) because it is supposed to make it easy to create your own customised ISO boot image. I thought that if I could get it set up and configured on the HP 2133, and then make an ISO of that, that would be really useful.

Open Source, it is not just for Linux anymore

linuxjournal.com: I was involved in an email discussion the other day with a fellow Amateur Radio operator about a program called UI-View. I was informed that the source code had been destroyed on the author’s death, at his request. This made me pause.

HOW TO: choose the best version of Linux

Filed under
Linux

apcmag.com: What's the best Linux distribution? It's one of the most commonly asked questions from people who are new to Linux. The answer? Well, there isn't really a simple answer.

Quick look around XFCE 4.6

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: I went for lightweight and speedy. That meant, of course, Arch, but also ext4 and the latest XFCE. Yes, XFCE isn’t the lightest solution I could have gone for. It’s no awesome, or evilwm, or even Openbox, but I was curious about the new 4.6 release, and I wanted to keep things relatively easy.

4 Great Tools to Find Files Quickly

Filed under
Software

gaarai.com: As is true with most things in Linux, there are great desktop tools, but more power can be found in Terminal than any streamlined desktop tool can match. Today, I’d like to introduce you to a few tools.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • For Fans of Drupal, a time to meet and talk code

  • HAL: new keys to match kernel version
  • Tempers Flare as Recession Creeps into Tech Industry
  • 15 Years Linux: Past and Future
  • More on Open Source Conversion Rate Myths
  • Open Source Media Center Apps Are Growing Up
  • Comux 001010
  • Linux stack and tools vendor launches community site
  • End of life for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1
  • Rule #3: Divide and conquer
  • Take Me Out to Ubuntu
  • The SFLS: Episode 0x08: Selecting a FLOSS License
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 61
  • Asking the wrong questions on open-source adoption
  • Asus Eee brings in anorexic computing
  • Mozilla Developer New 03/03
  • Time for open source to loosen up
  • Open Sources Episode 6: Open source in the enterprise
  • ZYpp 6.2.1, no mirror will stop you
  • Hive Five Winner for Best Home Server Software: Ubuntu Server Edition
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 1 Episode 3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Vim Cheatsheet Revisited

  • Boosting your Kernel on Gentoo
  • Playing Restricted Media When Using Ubuntu
  • Opera add / increase the number of speed dials (9.x and 10)
  • Boost Your Disk Performance by Using Journal Data Writeback Mode of Ext3
  • VirtualBox, Virtual Networking
  • Flegita: Gnome Scan - A Simple Scanning Alternative to XSane
  • StarCraft on Linux
  • My code is compiling
  • The Ultimate Guide To Manage Your Audio/Video Files In Linux

Evidence-Based Open Source Adoption

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com: I mentioned to a friend of mine the other day how I was replacing Word with OpenOffice in the long run. He replied that they use OO exclusively at his place of work.

Microsoft to Release Windows Linux!

Filed under
Humor

linugadgetech.blogspot: I was looking today at the packaging of my new Sabrent 3.5" internal card reader and noticed something very interesting on the front of the box. Do you see what I see? That's right, it lists Windows Linux.

Red Hat and Novell: Heading In Opposite Directions?

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: When Red Hat announces quarterly results March 25, the news may confirm what Wall Street has suspected since November 2008: Despite Novell’s continued momentum with SUSE Linux, the smarter money remains on Red Hat’s open source strategy. Here’s why:

Inside the Linux Foundation Purchase of Linux.com

Filed under
Linux
Web

earthweb.com: Two months after SourceForge’s Linux.com site stopped publishing new stories, the reason has finally been made public: The site has been acquired by the Linux Foundation.

linux too f*@King easy to install

Filed under
Linux

noronha.id.au: Ok I have a computer it generally stays on 24/7. it does important work like download files during off-peak download periods. It also is my svn server. samba etc… Ok so the short of the story is my computer got reformatted.

Tell Them It’s Linux!!

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: I saw an interesting video a few days ago. I found it amusing that most people thought KDE 4 was Windows 7 but hardly that surprising if I’m honest. But as I watched one thought screamed louder and louder inside my head, “for god’s sake tell them it’s Linux!!!”.

Linux the cool factor

Filed under
Linux

handlewithlinux.com: I have a bunch of designers at my job, and they all carry around an apple. No not the fruit, you know the vastly overpriced and over-hyped electronics brand. These guys think they are so cool. While Linux is actually a lot cooler then apple, it's not perceived by enough people as being cool.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, Radeon, Mir, Vulkan

  • Igalia Continues Working On Wayland & Accelerated Media Decode In Chromium On Linux
    Months ago we had reported on Igalia's efforts for improving hardware video/media acceleration on the Chromium browser stack for Linux and getting Chromium ready for Wayland but it's been relatively quiet since then with no status updates. Fortunately, a Phoronix reader pointed to a fresh round of ongoing work in this space. Igalia is working on supporting the V4L2 VDA (Video Decode Acceleration) on the Linux desktop for video/image decode of H.264, VP8, VP9, etc. Up to now the V4L2 VDA support was just used on ARM and under Chrome OS. This is part of the consulting firm's work on delivering first-rate Wayland support for Chromium -- it's a task they have been working on for quite some time.
  • Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2 Released With RenderDoc Interoperability
    AMD's GPUOpen group has announced the release of Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, it's open-source GPU performance profiler. What's significant about this release is initial interoperability with the popular RenderDoc debugger. Beginning with Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, there is beta support for allowing a profile be triggered from RenderDoc and for displaying data across the opposite tool along with synchronization between the two utilities.
  • Mir Is Running On Arch Linux; Mir Also Progressing With EGLStreams Support
    Prominent Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical has published his latest weekly update on the status of this Linux display server that continues working on supporting Wayland clients. First up, via the UBports community, Mir is now working on Arch Linux after some basic changes and packaging work. So similar to Ubuntu and Fedora and others, it's now easy to run Mir on Arch Linux if so desired.
  • VK9 - Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan - Hits 26th Milestone
    It's been a wild week for the various Direct3D-over-Vulkan projects with VKD3D 1.0 being released for the initial Direct3D 12 over Vulkan bits from the ongoing work in the Wine project to DXVK continuing to get better at its D3D11-over-VLK support. There's also an update on the VK9 front.
  • Wine-Staging 3.9 Fixes D3D 10/11 Gaming Performance Regressions
    One day after the exciting Wine 3.9 update with VKD3D work and more, the Wine-Staging code has been updated against this latest development release. While since the revival of Wine-Staging earlier this year there has been more than 900 out-of-tree/experimental patches against this Wine branch, with Wine-Staging 3.9 that patch count comes in at 895 patches. It's great to see with more of the changes working their way into upstream Wine after being vetted while other patches are no longer relevant. Also decided this week is that Wine-Staging developers will rely upon the WineHQ bug infrastructure for handling the submission of new Wine-Staging patches so that the work is much easier to track by users/developers in seeing the status and background on proposed patches for the staging tree.

Security: The Microsoft Cyber Attack, VPNFilter, Compliance, Docker

  • « The Microsoft Cyber Attack » : a German Documentary from the ARD on Relations Between Microsoft and Public Administration Now Available in English

    On February 19th, 2018, the German public broadcaster (ARD) aired a documentary on Microsoft relations with public administrations. Part of the inquiry is about the Open Bar agreement between Microsoft and the French ministry of Defense, including interviews of French Senator Joëlle Garriaud-Maylam, Leïla Miñano, a journalist, and Étienne Gonnu of April.

    The documentary is now available in English thanks to Deutsche Welle (DW), the German public international broadcaster, on its Youtube channel dedicated to documentaries : The Microsoft Cyber Attack. It should be noted that April considers itself as a Free software advocate, rather than open source, as the voice-over suggests.

  • VPNFilter UNIX Trojan – How to Remove It and Protect Your Network
    This article has been created to explain what exactly is the VPNFilter malware and how to secure your network against this massive infection by protecting your router as well as protecting your computers. A new malware, going by the name of VPNFilter has reportedly infected over 500 thousand router devices across most widely used brands such as Linksys, MikroTik, NETGEAR as well as TP-Link, mostly used in homes and offices. The cyber-sec researchers at Cisco Talos have reported that the threat is real and it is live, even thought the infected devices are under investigation at the moment. The malware reportedly has something to do with the BlackEnergy malware, which targeted multiple devices in Ukraine and Industrial Control Systems in the U.S.. If you want to learn more about the VPNFilter malware and learn how you can remove it from your network plus protect your network, we advise that you read this article.
  • FBI: Reboot Your Router Now To Fight Malware That Affected 500,000 Routers
  • Compliance is Not Synonymous With Security
    While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security. Along with the clear benefits to be gained from upholding the standards enforced by GDPR, PCI DSS, HIPAA, and other regulatory bodies often comes a shift toward a more compliance-centric security approach. But regardless of industry or regulatory body, achieving and maintaining compliance should never be the end goal of any security program. Here’s why:
  • Dialing up security for Docker containers
    Docker containers are a convenient way to run almost any service, but admins need to be aware of the need to address some important security issues. Container systems like Docker are a powerful tool for system administrators, but Docker poses some security issues you won't face with a conventional virtual machine (VM) environment. For example, containers have direct access to directories such as /proc, /dev, or /sys, which increases the risk of intrusion. This article offers some tips on how you can enhance the security of your Docker environment.

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

  • 11 Best Programming Fonts
    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!
  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty
    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines. [...] JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.
  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs
    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC. For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery. The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

today's howtos