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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 208

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: Localised distributions, Gutsy Gibbon features, product-creator module for YaST, PCLinuxOS Control Center, backporting kernel patches

  • Released last week: Mandriva Corporate Desktop 4.0, MoLinux 3.0
  • Upcoming releases: Alt Linux 4.0, Ubuntu 7.10 Alpha 2
  • New distribution: Hacao Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

One File System to Rule Them All

Filed under
Linux

Raiden's Realm: If there's one thing that drives me nuts about the current operating system models is that there is no one single file system that works across all operating systems, fills all the needs of everyone out there and is stable beyond mention to boot.

Linux becomes mature and achieves excellence

Filed under
Linux

People's Daily Online: In recent years, the world's leading software and hardware providers such as IBM and Intel are rushing to do compatibility testing and quality authentication with China's local Linux products.

3D desktops—Beryl, Compiz and more

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine: Some would say 3D desktops are useless fluff; some swear by them. This article gives you an overview of today’s 3D desktop options, and how they can help you be more productive.

Linux: Rewriting the Buffer Layer

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Posting a series of three patches, Nick Piggin announced that he was working on a rewrite of the buffer layer which he calls fsblock, "the name is fsblock because it basically ties the fs layer to the block layer." As to just what the buffer layer is, Nick explained.

Vista's failures explained

Filed under
Microsoft

the Inquirer: DEAR MICROSOFT, Please stop your whining, it is getting quite annoying. We do realise you have an OS called MeII (aka Vista) and it isn't selling. Please accept my sympathies but not my dollars, you lost me and all my clients as a customer. I am going Linux now.

Distribution Checklist: Part 1 of 3

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: As promised in a previous entry, here's the first half of a checklist I've been writing to help me evaluate other distributions. No doubt I think of more things when examining a distro, but here's a good start. For this first part of the series, I'll question the distribution's hardware support and its package manager.

Google and Linux Join Forces for Google OS

Filed under
Google

OSWeekly: In the past, we have explored the reality that, in many forms, the much anticipated "Google OS" has long since already arrived. But recently, there have been strong indicators that Google may be positioning for something more. And today, we will explore what this might look like if it were to actually happen.

Microsoft, Linux Distros Get Cozy: Let’s Get Scared

Filed under
Microsoft

OSWeekly: First we had Novell jumping onboard with Microsoft, and then came a cooperative deal with Xandros. Now we have Linspire following the trend and I’m left wondering: should we be worried? Many of you may point out that it is merely a handful of companies, but I see this differently. I see this as Microsoft trying to worm their way into the Linux market without making any real solid commitment to the users themselves.

The find and locate Commands Help You Uncover the Files You are Looking for

Filed under
HowTos

about.com: find is a powerful command line tool for identifying sets of files based on their names. With locate you can quickly find all files containing a given string.

openSUSE 10.2 - A Review

Filed under
SUSE

shift+backspace: Recently there has been plenty of news regarding the alpha releases of the next openSUSE release, 10.3. While I will be taking a look at the Alpha 5 or Alpha 6 release in the near future, many users have requested a review of openSUSE 10.2.

Fun with GStreamer Audio effects

Filed under
Software

gnomejournal: Stefan Kost describes GStreamer features that have been implemented and that are in the works, and he steps users through setting up an example with which to play.

The Guide to 100% Linux/KDE Desktop Success

Filed under
Linux

Peter P. Parker: This is a guide on how Linux and especially the KDE desktop could revolutionize the world of computers and operating systems and bring a major breakthrough so Linux would go mainstream.

Mark Shuttleworth’s Ubuntu perspective

Filed under
Ubuntu

Alan Zeichick Weblog: If the Linux community has a hero other than Linus Torvalds, it’s Mark Shuttleworth, a dot-com gazillionaire who started the Ubuntu Project, and who funds it out of his own pocket.

Free software wars re-ignite

Filed under
OSS

financialexpress: The world of corporate computing seems to be preparing for a paradigm shift. Free and open source software movement claims to be making fresh inroads into corporates. Microsoft has also upped its ante, claiming lower cost of ownership and the patents open source software violates.

Report from MTLC's 2nd Annual Open Source Summit in Boston

Filed under
OSS

Groklaw: A Groklaw member who attended last week's Second Annual Open Source Summit in Boston has written up a report for us. He describes what each panel or talk was about, so you will know which you want to listen to.

Gwenview progress

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: In case you missed it, Gwenview has moved to kdegraphics. The KDE4 port of Gwenview is more a rewrite than a port, at least from the user perspective. It's already usable in its current state.

Upgrading ALSA drivers, libraries and utilities on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

jonas.io: I have notebook with a Intel HDA soundchip, it was not fully supported by the alsa 1.0.13 drivers that came with openSuSE 10.2 and no updated RPM’s was available. so I manually had to upgrade them to 1.0.14.

Jupiter is born

Filed under
Linux

A week ago we announced our intention to pull together what we (in those ancient days), termed as “LASnix” (aka “Linux Action Show *nix”). We’ve also decided on an official name for the project, that being “Jupiter.”

Mandriva 2007 Spring on a Sony Vaio S4XP

Filed under
MDV

tuxvaio: As with the installation of SuSE 10.1, installing Mandriva 2007 was frightfully simple. All devices worked with the sole exception of the wireless functionality of the Centrino. This can be fixed by a software download or a inexpensive Linux compatible PC card wireless adapter.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.