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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SnapRAID Yields A New RAID Kernel Library For Linux Rianne Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 6:53pm
Story Raspberry Pi: RaspBMC and OpenELEC Rianne Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 6:45pm
Story In Mobile, GNU and Linux Victories Are Everywhere, So Microsoft Tries to Interject Itself Into Linux Rianne Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 6:40pm
Story Summary of 2013 and New Year's list Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:28am
Story What to expect from Ubuntu in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:25am
Story Belkin shows Linux powered smart slow cooker at CES 2014 Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:20am
Story Why Acer's new Android desktops are a game-changer Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:10am
Story Ubuntu 13.10 - The "Marmite" Linux Operating System Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:08am
Story Is Microsoft Grasping at Straws? Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:06am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 12:06am

What I hate about Linux

Filed under
Linux

crunchgear.com: There is no direction. No singular standards. No cohesion between applications. No interoperability. The entire OS is built upon several groups of people working in their own little world on their own little projects.

some howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Moblock: Peerguardian for Linux

  • TIP: Gentoo libexpat.so error simple fix
  • Linux Bash tutorial 4: The power of regular expressions
  • Short Tip: Convert Ogg Vorbis file to MP3
  • Print to PDF using PCLinuxOS/Kubuntu any KDE distro
  • HowTo: Move Multiple Files Recursively
  • Get more e-mail flexibility with Fetchmail
  • OS X-Like Widgets with Screenlets on Ubuntu (Update)
  • HowTo: Single Step VirtualBox Installation on Fedora 8

Linux Gazette December 2007 (#145) Ready

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is online and ready to enjoy. Highlights include New Use for Old Hardware: Network RAID Backup, Review: User Interface Design for Mere Mortals, and Linux on an ARM based Single Board Computer.

Hans Reiser's Mom Tells Jurors One Thing, Police Another

Filed under
Reiser

wired: Hans Reiser's mother took the witness stand at her son's murder trial Monday, offering a different explanation about what she thought happened to her daughter in law than what she told police days after Nina Reiser vanished last year.

In-depth review of Mandriva Linux 2008

Filed under
MDV

The community site Mandriva Linux tips for free has posted a very in-depth and detailed review of Mandriva Linux 2008 that looks at all the important areas of setup, configuration, compatibility and software choice on a variety of hardware here.

Living With Daryna for One Week

Filed under
Linux

softpedia: Ok, ok... I know it's a little too late for a review of Linux Mint 4.0 (codename Daryna), but I was "dating" her sisters and I thought: "Why not give Daryna a chance, too?". This review has been written during an entire week, starting the 26th and ending the 30th of November.

Review: Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

smh.com.au: "PSST. You wanna buy a laptop for $500? Brand new, mate, still in the box and got a year's warranty. It's got wireless internet, it's got the works, mate." You'd expect to hear this line from some dodgy-looking guy in the pub. But Australia's cheapest laptop is now on sale.

10 More Games from the Ubuntu Universe

Filed under
Gaming

jonathancarter.co.za: Previously, I blogged about 10 games that’s available in the Ubuntu Universe that I found interesting. Since then, the Ubuntu MOTU Games team has merged with the Debian games team, and the amount of packaged games have increased.

Mozilla scoffs at vulnerability study rating IE superior to Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica: Jeffrey Jones recently posted a report (PDF format) that was featured in the CSO online magazine. Jones came to the conclusion that, contrary to popular belief, Internet Explorer has experienced fewer security vulnerabilities than Firefox over the same periods of time.

KMyMoney - KDE finance management

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Money management. It’s generally not very fun, but it’s something we all have to deal with. There are several open source applications for finance management. Over on the KDE specific side, we have KMyMoney.

HotHardware Interview on Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Interviews

dot.kde.org: The new Asus Eee PC has been released to many positive reviews and great consumer interest. HotHardware.com was one of the very first sites to review the Asus Eee and report back on this new device. Read on for an interview with Editor-in-Chief Dave Altavilla and his thoughts on the Asus Eee PC and its value proposition.

When is half a loaf enough for open source?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: The last month has seen several attempts to give open source advocates half of what they have been asking for. In all these cases, and more we see bows to the open source concept from vendors still demanding the control open source resists.

All about Linux swap space

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: When your computer needs to run programs that are bigger than your available physical memory, most modern operating systems use a technique called swapping, in which chunks of memory are temporarily stored on the hard disk while other data is moved into physical memory space. Here are some techniques that may help you better manage swapping on Linux systems and get the best performance from the Linux swapping subsystem.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 231

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: A grand overview of popular desktop distributions

  • News: Ubuntu "Hardy Heron", openSUSE Weekly News, Mandriva Flash and Linutop,
  • Fedora release history, interview with Eric Sandall from Source Mage, Foresight 2.0 plans

  • Released last week: CentOS 5.1, Damn Small Linux 4.1
  • Upcoming releases: Frugalware Linux 0.8 Pre 1
  • Donations: MEPIS receives US$300
  • New additions: Vixta.org
  • New distributions: Jazz Linux, Pendrive Linux, ZXMameCD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Apache gains market share

Filed under
Software

liquidat: After Apache’s market share was shrinking month after month for more than a year it grew again a bit according to Netcraft. There are no reasons given but it is simply good to see that the fall of Apache was at least stopped for this month.

Linux Media Player Roundup - Part 6

Filed under
Software

Raiden's Realm: Welcome to part 6 of our series. Today we'll be bringing you Rythmbox, Songbird, Totem and one of our previously missed media players, Aqualung.

Back Up Your Files With Pybackpack On Fedora 8

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up, configure and use Pybackpack on Fedora 8.

Vocalize Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Two recently released text-to-speech extensions can transform Firefox into a talking Web browser suitable for users with visual impairments -- and anyone else who can use a speech interface to the Web.

some shorts / howtos

Filed under
News
  • Auto Shutdown with KShutdown

  • Howto Install Avant Window Navgator in ubuntu gutsy gibbon
  • Setting up Quanta Plus to edit files on your web server

Network-Manager-GNOME vs. Wicd Reviewed

Filed under
Software

OSWeekly: Having spent the last few days really examining what Gutsy has to offer on the wireless front, I have been content with improvements made to the network-manager for GNOME. Having thoroughly tested my RT2500 and RT61 Ralink wireless cards, I was impressed with the new wireless stack and network-manager's ability to handle the wireless cards with zero hassle.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.