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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story With Android L, Google makes pitch for enterprise users Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:50am
Story New Features Coming For Qt 5.4 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:45am
Story Why Raspberry Pi is still the white knight of education Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:21am
Story Where KDE is going - Part 1 Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:49am
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r1 Is an Interesting Debian and GNOME 3.10 Mix Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:12am
Story The big takeaway from Google I/O: Linux everywhere Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:07am
Story OpenELEC 4.0.6 Is Now Based on Linux Kernel 3.14.8 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:53am
Story Ubuntu Touch Core App Hack Days Announced in Anticipation of RTM Version Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:45am
Story New Linus Interview, LinuxQuestions.org, and Floundering Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:20am
Story Native Android apps are coming to Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 1:00am

It's time to retire "ready for the desktop"

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Quite a few reviews of new Linux releases these days try to determine if a distribution is "ready for the desktop." I myself have probably been guilty of using that phrase, but I think it's time we officially retire this criterion.

25 Coolest and Funniest Tux Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: People just can't get enough of Tux, the world-renowned penguin mascot of Linux. I decided to give Tux lovers another treat by handing out my list of twenty coolest, funniest, and maybe cutest Tux wallpapers. So without any more delay, here they are:

Chapter 2: Project management and the GNU coding standards

Filed under
Software
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: In Chapter 1, I gave a brief overview of the Autotools and some of the resources that are currently available to help reduce the learning curve. In this chapter, we’re going to step back a little and examine project organization techniques that are applicable to all projects, not just those whose build system is managed by the Autotools.

gOS (Linux) Usability Review

Filed under
Linux

osweekly.com: As you might remember from my previous piece on gOS, some people have felt like the current gOS offering provided on Everex machines were simply not good enough for casual use. In this piece, I take it even further, with a full review on gOS' overall usability.

Firefox 3 RC 1 full review

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: A year and a half after the last major Firefox release, Firefox 3 Release Candidate 1 is here with a very long list of new features and improvements.

Also: 'Awesome Bar': Firefox's next killer feature?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • HOWTO: Passwordless Login using Gentoo’s Keychain

  • Keeping your SSH connections alive with autossh
  • Querying a database using open source voice control software
  • Really rough guide to ATI/FGLRX on openSUSE 11.0 Beta3 i586
  • Ignoring All Standard Characters Using Perl In Linux Or Unix
  • Installing Linux Without a CD: The Easy Process
  • FedEx using Drupal

  • Nice OpenSUSE Icons
  • Solving the famous “smart” case 2
  • Kernel hacker and Red Hat driver maintainer Jon Masters (video)
  • Nouveau Companion 39
  • OpenSSL Vulnerability Comic
  • A Linux Family Tragedy
  • How Open Is Microsoft?
  • Open Source in 2013

Comparison Between 5 Linux Web Browsers

Filed under
Software

50webs.org: The comparison includes the major five Linux browsers: Konqueror, Firefox, Opera, Epiphany and Galeon. I'm aware of others like Dillo or the older Mozilla, but decided to include only the big players at the moment.

Justifying Snort

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: I believe the majority of objections to the value of Snort stem from the fact that it's called an intrusion detection system (IDS). Looking closely at that label, we should assume that an IDS is a "system" that "detects" "intrusions." Upon hearing this, IDS salespeople rushed back to their engineers with requirements for an "IDS" that "prevented intrusions."

Firefox 3 Release Candidate now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: The first Firefox 3 Release Candidate is now available for download. This milestone is focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.

Nothing New Under the Sun. Or Red Hat, or FSF, or OSI, or...

Filed under
OSS

Linux Today: Normally I find the missives from the 451 crew pretty insightful. But in Matthew Aslett's recent post, "Trouble in Paradise?" I find I have to take some exception. Matt. Dude. It was never paradise. Aslett raises the alarm that lately there has been a significant rise in animosity between the open source community the open source business vendors.

Fedora 9 makes Linux easy

Filed under
Linux

mybroadband.co.za: Six months after the release of Fedora 8, version 9 of the Linux operating system has been released. Fedora, the Red Hat-backed Linux version, is an easy to use system that makes even first-time Linux users feel at home.

Android vs. LiMo: What’s the difference?

Filed under
Linux

mobilecrunch.com: LiMo is Linux-based. Android is Linux-based. But they’re far from the same. Below, I’ll try to explain some of the key differences without going too heavy on the tech jargon.

Community-Powered Open Source Awards Just Got More Open

Filed under
OSS

money.cnn.com: SourceForge, the leader in community-driven media and e-commerce, today announced the opening of nominations for the third annual SourceForge.net Community Choice Awards. For the first time, all open source projects -- not just those on SourceForge.net -- are eligible.

Installing Ubuntu 8.04 on Virtual PC: It takes a village

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: I’ve played around with Linux a little on other’s machines, but I’ve never installed it myself or really tried to use it on a day-to-day basis. So, ready to take the plunge, I decided to install it in a virtual environment so that I could easily switch between it and all of my Windows-based tools and applications that I use for my editing duties. Keep in mind that I’m an editor (translation: English major), not a tech person, and will claim only a reasonable amount of tech savviness as a user.

Fedora 9: I'm not impressed

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: Fedora 9 was released earlier this week to great fanfare. There were the usual spate of 'ain't-it-wonderful' articles, extolling the virtues of this latest release (you know, the kind of pap I used to write about openSUSE and Ubuntu). So I said to myself said I, "I'll just download the Fedora 9 Gnome and KDE live CDs and see how they install." And so, I did.

Anonymous Web surfing with TorK

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Everyone who surfs the Net is eminently trackable. Internet data packets include not only the actual data being sent, but also headers with routing information that is used to guide the packages to their destinations. If you want a higher level of anonymity, TorK can do the job. It uses The Onion Router (Tor) network to provide you with a safer way of browsing.

Five Reasons Red Hat Should Ignore Consumer Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Okay, it has been about a month since Red Hat said it had no plans to offer a consumer Linux release. Lots of folks went ballistic. The VAR Guy didn’t. Instead, he took some time to digest the news. And now he’s ready to say — definitively — that Red Hat made the right decision. Here are five reasons:

How can someone miss a meeting?

Filed under
Gentoo

flameeyes.eu: Well, shit happens people, and it seems like the extraordinary meeting that was supposedly scheduled yesterday night found Donnie and Wernfried (amne) alone in the channel. As people seems to either look at this as a sign of the council misbehaviour, or just as an escape route from an hostile council.

KDE4 on Gentoo

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo

kev009.com: So I bit the bullet and installed KDE 4.0 on Gentoo. Version 4.0.4 recently hit the tree, and with some minor hackary to package.unmask and package.keywords I have a nice spartan KDE 4.0.4 desktop that I am typing this in.

A Tale of Four Kernels

Filed under
OS

spinellis.gr: The FreeBSD, GNU/Linux, Solaris, and Windows operating systems have kernels that provide comparable facilities. Interestingly, their code bases share almost no common parts, while their development processes vary dramatically. We analyze the source code of the four systems by collecting metrics in the areas of file organization, code structure, code style, the use of the C preprocessor, and data organization.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.