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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE 4.10 Brings Better, Smarter Dolphin srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:40pm
Story The Cost of Ubuntu srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:03pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 3:21pm
Story There's a New Package Manager in Town srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 4:13am
Story 15 Weird/Surprising Devices And Systems That Run On Linux srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 12:22am
Story Why I work at Red Hat srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 12:20am
Story What’s new in Kate srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 12:18am
Story Linux User Kernel Column 3.7 srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 12:16am
Story Trying openSUSE srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 8:45pm
Story Ubuntu 12.10's New Features Boost Productivity srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 8:40pm

Watch online video? Get Miro

Filed under
Software

linux.com: First it was called DTV, then Democracy Player, and now it is Miro. Whatever you call it, the Mozilla-based, cross-platform, open source video player is now in public release. Miro differs from playback front ends like VLC by offering integrated content-finding and content-management tools.

Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 4 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: There is about two months left until the final release of Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon, but today marks the release of Ubuntu 7.10 Tribe 4. New in this alpha release is GNOME 2.19.6, desktop search capabilities through Tracker, and OpenOffice.org 2.3.

People of openSUSE: Pascal Bleser

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

openSUSE news: Today ‘People of openSUSE’ starts. This project aims to make the people behind the openSUSE project and the distribution more visible. Therefore there will be several interviews with different contributors published on news.opensuse.org. Now let’s start with Pascal Bleser.

Vista Aiding Linux Desktop, Strategist Says

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: Microsoft will lose market share to open-source desktops, a Dell strategist says at LinuxWorld. It has probably created the single biggest opportunity for the Linux desktop to take market share.

CEO Hovsepian Says Novell Will Ship GPLv3 Code, Even If Microsoft Is Paying For It

Filed under
SUSE

information week: Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian says it is in his interest to give customers GPLv3 code when they are seeking updates, even if the customer was paying for Novell support through Microsoft certificates.

Linux Foundation calls for 'respect for Microsoft'

Filed under
OS

vnunet: Linux needs to recognise Microsoft's leadership in some areas to better itself, Jim Zemlin, executive director for the Linux Foundation told delegates at the Linuxworld tradeshow in San Fransisco.

Mandriva 2008 Brings Windows Migration Support

Filed under
MDV

softpedia: Cassini is the name of the first beta release of the upcoming Mandriva Linux 2008, announced yesterday by the Mandriva team. This beta is available only as a three CD Free edition (containing no non-free software or drivers) for the x86-32 architecture, with a traditional installer.

Linux Vs. Mac: Linux Users Respond

Filed under
OS

Serdar Yegulalp (informationweek): Linux users had some interesting opinions about our recent article comparing Mac OS X with Linux, and didn't leave Windows out of the discussion.

A move to Ubuntu after 10 years of Redhat/Fedora

Filed under
Ubuntu

chrismatchett blog: I have been using Redhat/Fedora linux for the past 10 years, starting with RedHat 5.0. I recently decided to move to Ubuntu and here are some reasons why…

How to sneak Linux into your office

Filed under
Linux

itbusiness: I’m actually beginning to picture a day when users start to ask their IT departments why they can’t run Ubuntu Linux at work, the way they do at home. Make a business case and make it stick. It's easier than you think.

The openSUSE Project Turns Two

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE news: It happened again. Another year passed (flew by). Happy Birthday openSUSE! In the past 365 days we successfully released openSUSE 10.2 with numerous improvements and new features. Up until now it has been installed hundreds of thousands of times.

How To Convert Songs From An Audio CD Into MP3/Ogg Files With K3b

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This guide describes how you can use the CD/DVD burning application K3b to convert songs from an audio CD into MP3 or Ogg files that you can use on your MP3 player.

Install extra Themes and Icons in PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
HowTos

YALB: Are you a PCLinuxOS 2007 user? Are you one of the many that love the default theme and think it’s eye catching but wish you could change it and make it your own? Do you wish there were more themes, icon sets, and bling for your desktop that would be easy to add? Here’s how I was able to customize PCLinuxOS 2007.

Tip: Download Accelerator for Linux

Filed under
HowTos

All about Linux: There are different ways of downloading files from remote locations. The most common and fail safe method of downloading huge files in Linux is to use the wget tool. But here is a nice tip to speed up your download of files by a significant factor.

Torvalds, Red Hat are no shows at Linuxworld

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: The two biggest names in the Linux industry – Linus Torvalds and Red Hat – skipped out on LinuxWorld again.

MySQL ends distribution of Enterprise source tarballs

Filed under
Software

linux.com: MySQL quietly let slip that it would no longer be distributing the MySQL Enterprise Server source as a tarball, not quite a year after the company announced a split between its paid and free versions.

Linux: Enforcing the Merge Window

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Following a recent merge request, Linus Torvalds stressed that he was serious about not wanting to merge any big changes after the merge window closes, "get the changes in before -rc1, or just *wait*.

Ubuntu’nification

Filed under
Ubuntu

nixternal: My stance, I don’t think it is necessary to unify the names under the Ubuntu Desktop. It seems a large motive that I have seen so far is to answer the question of “What is Kubuntu?” or “What is Xubuntu?”.

Submit your nominations for the 2007 free software awards

Filed under
Software

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the requests for nominations for the 10th annual 2007 Free Software Awards.

Using GParted to Resize Your Windows Vista Partition

Filed under
HowTos

How-to Geek: One of the more advanced options for resizing your Windows Vista partition is to use the GParted Live CD, a bootable linux CD that takes you straight into GParted, the great linux utility for managing partitions. The problem is that if you resize your boot/system partition, you will be completely unable to boot without repairing windows.

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This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

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today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.