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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry OpenIndiana Desktop 151 review finid 15/10/2011 - 4:17pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 15/10/2011 - 6:49am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 15/10/2011 - 6:29am
Story Desktop virtualization: Parallels vs. VMware vs. VirtualBox srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:39pm
Story First Linux Benchmarks Of AMD FX-8150 Bulldozer srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:36pm
Story Word on the Street srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 11:35pm
Story Looking for a Polished Linux Desktop? Consider KDE srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 8:46pm
Story CAINE (Computer Aided INvestigative Environment) – Digital Forensics LiveCD srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 7:24pm
Story Sabayon 7 vs. Ubuntu 11.10 Performance srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 7:22pm
Story 15 years of KDE srlinuxx 14/10/2011 - 7:21pm

The Open Source Security Motherload: 105 Tools, Applications and Resources

Filed under
Software

Open source security is like a military general who shows his plans to both his allies and his enemies. On the one hand, his enemies can try to exploit the plan by targeting its weaknesses. But on the other hand, by exposing his tactics to those who want to help, the plan is ultimately much stronger as a result of their feedback and modifications.

Red Hat Linux Not Likely To Be Offered On Dell Desktop PCs

Filed under
Linux

In a brief research note this morning, Pacific Crest’s Brendan Barnicle writes that it “seems unlikely” that Dell will offer Red Hat’s (RHT) version of Linux on its desktop PCs. Barnicle writes that his contacts believe the company is more likely to choose a version of Linux from Ubuntu or possibly Novell (NOVL).

Linux Foundation pushes OS to common ground

Filed under
Interviews

In January, two open-source advocacy groups -- the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group (FSG) -- merged and formed the Linux Foundation. Last month, the new nonprofit organization named its board of directors, which includes representatives from Linux vendors and users, as well as Linux kernel developers and other open-source community members.

Goodbye etch, hello lenny

Filed under
Linux

The long-anticipated Debian 4.0 may only just have made its debut this week, but it's never too soon for the developer community to be making plans for its successor.

Ubuntu's new Linux sports debugging tool

Filed under
Ubuntu

With its upcoming "Feisty Fawn" version of Ubuntu Linux due April 19, Canonical hopes to shed light on what happens when things go wrong.

Ubuntu's new Linux sports debugging tool With its upcoming "Feisty Fawn" version of Ubuntu Linux due April 19, Canonical hopes to shed light on what happens when things go wrong.

Timed shutdown in openSUSE: kshutdown

Filed under
HowTos

I never thought I’d need it, but today I did. I needed a timer (for shutdown) in linux.

context: I was doing some bittorrent downloads during an ISP limited timeframe. I had to finish by 8:00am otherwise it would cost me dearly!

tried and failed: I googled for “timed shutdown” and found two main solutions… THAT DIDN’T WORK in openSUSE.

So what worked?

Ubuntu 7.04 - 108 new updates, Gnome 2.18.1 upgrade, network regression

Filed under
Ubuntu

Got a big block of upgrades today, including Gnome. Gnome itself was upgraded to 2.18.1 and Ubuntu followed right along. Quick testing indicates that Compiz is still regressed from the last upgrade, which is no big deal to me. Regular old 'flat' mode still works just fine, and I can live with that.

No, there's a bigger problem. When the system reboots networking does not automatically start.

Are GPLv3 and Apache 2 incompatible?

Filed under
OSS

One of the GPLv3's (GNU General Public License version 3) goals was be more compatible with other open-source licenses. There is some concern, however, that this goal has not been achieved in relation to the Apache License 2.

Quick Little Tour of Opera's New Speed Dial

Filed under
Software
-s

Opera 9.2 was released this morning to a surprizing amount of interest. I suppose one of the reasons for all this excitement is the new feature called Speed Dial.

Dispelling the fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) about Linux

Filed under
Linux

The fear, uncertainty and doubt surrounding Linux is still immense and it's purely through lack of education. If only people could see what's happening in the community they might change their tune. Here's why the FUD is misplaced.

Squid in 5 minutes

Filed under
HowTos

Why Squid? Why only five minutes?

There are many great tools that Squid has to offer, but when I need to redirect http traffic to a caching server for performance increases or security, squid’s my pick. Squid has built in proxy and caching tools that are simple, yet effective.

Open Source, Stat!

Filed under
OSS

There is a syndrome that has lately been plaguing the "Big 4" proprietary vendors.

I will call it the "Acquisition/Confusion Syndrome." It can be severely damaging, and anyone exposed to it is susceptible to infection.

The point of exposure occurs when a "Big 4" vendor acquires a smaller, focused start-up in the hopes of expanding their offerings to their customers.

Web Browser Shows Glance of 9 Favorites

Filed under
Software

The latest version of Opera's Web browser lets visitors see mini versions of their nine favorite sites at a glance. Click on any thumbnail to load the full site.

The Speed Dial feature also lets people access the site by typing its corresponding numeral -- 1 to 9 -- in the address bar.

"Speed Dial is a fresh way to call up the top sites you enjoy throughout the day."

Ubuntu Linux Forges Tighter DB2 Ties

Filed under
Ubuntu

IBM's DB2 has long been a Linux-friendly, cross-platform database. But as of this week, there will be improved coexistence between DB2 and the latest Ubuntu 6.06 Linux release.

The latest IBM database will now download and deploy easily from the Ubuntu desktop. If users want DB2, they can go to the download site, and Ubuntu automates the download and installs it.

Open-Source Security Tools Abound

Filed under
OSS

Open-source security tools abound, so take advantage of them and avoid paying for commercial products if open source fits your needs. That was the message from Matthew Luallen, president of consulting firm Sph3r3, who spoke at the recent InfoSec Conference.

The Road to KDE 4: Strigi and File Information Extraction

Filed under
KDE

After a short delay due to a heavy dosage of Real Life(tm), I return to bring you more on the technologies behind KDE 4. This week I am featuring Strigi, an information extraction subsystem that is being fully deployed for KDE 4.0.

Ubuntu Linux: To the server side and beyond?

Filed under
Ubuntu

As the launch of Ubuntu "Feisty Fawn" 7.04 draws near, proponents of the Linux operating system (OS) are predicting much wider adoption of it in server environments.

Bolstering that belief is Canonical Ltd.'s -- Ubuntu's corporate sponsor -- promise that the OS's existing server functionality would be better marketed in 2007.

LinuxWorld San Francisco 2007

Filed under
Linux

IDG World Expo, the leading producer of world-class tradeshows and events has announced that attendee registration for LinuxWorld Conference & Expo 2007 is now open.

KDE Promo IRC meeting - April 15 at 1700 GMT

Filed under
KDE

If you’re already involved in the KDE promotional community, would like to get involved, or you’re just plain nosey: we welcome you to join us at 1700 GMT April 15th on IRC #kde-promo on irc.freenode.net. Of course, you’ll also want to pay attention to details on our mailing list.

This meeting will be the first in a series; we’ll be meeting every second Sunday on IRC going forward.

Updating Ubuntu’s Edgy Eft to Feisty Fawn with Automatix2

Filed under
HowTos

Here’s the scenario. You’ve got a 6.10 box with Automatix2 installed, which you’ve used to install a number of third party additions to your nice, shiney Ubuntu box. Now you want to upgrade from 6.10 to 7.04 but you’re a bit gun shy as you recall what it was like to update to 6.10.

So what’s it going to be like this time? Let’s find out!

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.