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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jelly Bean spills onto 60 percent of Android devices Rianne Schestowitz 2 06/02/2014 - 7:39am
Story Linux should be a part of School Education Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 1:40am
Story Why open source will rule the data center Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 1:36am
Story KDE 4.12.2 and 4.11.6 Officially Released with More than 20 Bugfixes Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 1:31am
Story Open source no longer considered avant garde for IT innovators Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 1:24am
Story GIMP free alternative to subscription model Photoshop updated Roy Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 1:03am
Story Hardening the Linux desktop Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 12:44am
Story Ryman (Large UK Chain) Switches to GNU/Linux on Desktops Roy Schestowitz 05/02/2014 - 11:51pm
Story Heard of the GNOME Outreach Program for Women? Learn more today. Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2014 - 11:50pm
Story (GNOME) Videos is here! Rianne Schestowitz 05/02/2014 - 11:35pm

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Linux.com Weekly Wire #4 (video)

  • Linux Command Reference Manual Part III
  • Kubuntu Hardy and LTS FAQ
  • The latest PulseAudio on Ubuntu

Third World children love new laptops

Filed under
OLPC

AP: Doubts about whether poor, rural children really can benefit from quirky little computers evaporate as quickly as the morning dew in this hilltop Andean village, where 50 primary-school children got machines from the One Laptop Per Child project six months ago.

Ubuntu on Dell Inspiron 6400

Filed under
Ubuntu

dbzer0.com/blog: So four days ago my girlfriend informed me that her laptop totally b0rked. Blue Screen of Death on boot. Unfortunately, as she didn’t have the recovery CDs for the laptop with her and I didn’t have any Windoze XP installation handy I considered installing Ubuntu.

NVClock 0.8 (Beta3) Released

Filed under
Software

linuxhardware.org: It is finally time for a new beta release 0.8 Beta3. Note this release is beta, some Geforce8 features are still missing and also realize that the release is still very experimental.

KDE to Appear at SCALE 6x

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: When most folks think of February they muse about hearts and roses. But in Southern California, free software enthusiasts look forward to the Southern California Linux Exposition. KDE will once again be represented at SCALE 6x (February 8-10, 2008) showing off the newly released KDE 4.0.

Linux on the Dell Inspiron 1520

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Of all people, after having installed and used 40+ Linux distributions, I should know which distribution I want to put on my new computer. I didn't. I ended up trying out Ubuntu 7.10 (32 and 64-bit) and Sabayon 3.4f (32-bit).

Improved Ogg Theora coming soon to an Internet near you

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Free software for video is currently in sad shape. The only two widely distributed free video editing programs, Kino and Cinelerra, are nowhere near as capable as competing commercial software. Hardly any professional video producers use either one. But most people aren't as concerned with the software used to make video as with the software they need to play it, especially in their Web browsers, and on this side of the video equation it looks like things are going to get a lot better for free software enthusiasts in 2008.

RPM 5.0 Released

Filed under
Software

rpm5.org: After seven months of comprehensive development, the popular Unix software packaging tool RPM Package Manager (RPM) was released as stable version 5.0.0.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Video: Mark Cox, episode 3. Tips for a secure system

  • Setting up Compiz/Fusion on Ubuntu Linux
  • Secure Our Server Part 1: Firewalls
  • How to run Safari in Linux using Wine
  • Make Debian/Ubuntu look like Windows
  • Linux Optimize Directories ( File Access Time ) in ext3 Filesystem

AMD Phenom 9500 Linux Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Have you recently upgraded to AMD's Spider platform with their quad-core Phenom processor and are running Linux? If so, and are experiencing kernel panics, stability problems, and even a psychedelic Ubuntu logo, you're not alone. In this article, we'll be looking at the AMD Phenom 9500 performance under Ubuntu 7.10.

Why you should not use pyinotify

Filed under
Linux

serpentine.com: A while ago, I had a need to monitor filesystem modifications, and I looked around for Python bindings for the Linux kernel’s inotify subsystem. At the time, the only existing library was pyinotify, so being a lazy sort, I naturally tried to use it.

Free/Open-source Text Editors

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: A text editor is a type of program used for editing plain text files. Here is a list of valuable free/open-source text editors with graphical user interface (GUI).

Countries Adopting ODF Annual Report and Future Outlook

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: The OpenDocument Format Alliance (ODF Alliance) is an organization dedicated to educating on the benefits and opportunities of ODF. Launched in March 2006, the ODF Alliance now has over 480 member organizations in 53 countries.

AMD Releases Additional R600 GPU Programming Documentation

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: In the second NDA-free documentation dump, AMD has just released programming data on the M76 and RS690 graphics processors. In this article, we have information on this just-released data as well as what else the community can expect in the way of documentation in the near future.

a stable arch branch?

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Don’t look now, but it could become a reality. A thread here describes the rationale for a snapshot of Arch at periodic intervals, allowing users to bounce between stable points, rather than use Arch in the rolling fashion it has now.

Firefox 3: Why Bother to Upgrade?

Filed under
Moz/FF

OSWeekly: Despite Firebird eventually maturing into Firefox that we all know today, I can't believe that I have yet to find any indication that the Mozilla team is planning on improving the really lame handling of RSS feeds. Flock is providing users with so much more and despite this, Firefox continues to remain with most of the same features it always has - why? I know. It's Google.

Flock: The browser that makes browsing obsolete

Filed under
Software

telegraph.co.uk: Think of the innovation that's happened in the last decade - the emergence of Google, YouTube and Facebook - and then consider for a moment the comparative lack of innovation in one crucial area: our web browsers, the software we use to access the internet.

gOS: A wake up call for Freedomware marketing

Filed under
Linux

libervis.com: Think gOS. It might not be such a bad advice after all. It's been hyped up, but it sold out. And there may be lessons in its deployment and success for all of us Free Software and GNU/Linux advocates! How can we trust any central entity with our computing activities and our data, an entity which is at that a private profit-driven, shareholder pressured public company?

Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG Game?

Filed under
Gaming

linuxfud.wordpress: Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game) that’s extremely easer to install (yes, like in Microsoft Windows)?? I love this game!

Are $100 Laptops Doomed?

Filed under
Linux

Newsweek: At next week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the semiconductor giant Intel was planning to demonstrate a prototype of the celebrated One Laptop Per Child "XO" computer that runs not with the original AMD microprocessor but its own chip. But now Intel has broken with OLPC, and once again, One Laptop's founder, Nicholas Negroponte, is charging that the chip giant is messing with his charitable efforts for its own corporate ends.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE