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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 11:50pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 11:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 11:50pm
Story OpenMandriva Lx 3 Working On Adding Wayland Shells, KF5 + Plasma 5 Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 11:07pm
Story openSUSE 12.3 Is Officially Dead Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 11:00pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 10:43pm
Story Linux Journal: You're the Boss with UBOS j12t 03/02/2015 - 10:10pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 10:01pm
Story LQ Members Choice Award Winners Announced Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:43pm
Story Windows 10 Will Not Kill the Linux Desktop, It Actually Needs It Rianne Schestowitz 03/02/2015 - 9:31pm

Why Picking a Linux Distro is Like Picking a Girlfriend

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.wordpress: Choosing a Linux distro is a lot lot choosing a girlfriend. If she appears too needy or too high maintenance, I am probably not going for a second date. Of course, a pretty face doesn’t hurt, but as my previous review showed, there is a lot more to her than her looks.

When Enterprise meets FOSS

Filed under
OSS

ditns.blogspot: If 2008 had a buzzword, it was probably community. More and more companies are looking to tap into communities for contributions to open source projects. But following the open-source trend just because everyone is doing it isn't good enough. To succeed, you need a well-thought-out community plan.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • MySQL 5.1 downloaded a million times

  • VIA Interested In Gallium3D For Chrome 9
  • In the beginning…
  • How I started using Linux
  • OpenSuse 11.1 Day 4 Happiness!
  • Giving up on Microsoft
  • How Private Are Private Browser Modes?
  • 1.5-pound mini-laptop boots Linux fast
  • X Server 1.6 Sees 34 New Commits Today
  • Linux Basement: Episode 34 - Interview With Robert
  • Linux Void: Episode 17 - Trippy Line
  • Australian FOSS Advocates Miss-a-Trick
  • Boxee does better
  • First time on Fedora Live CD
  • Browser annoyances - mailto: links
  • SFTP on Ubuntu and Debian in 9 easy steps
  • A Few Notes about the GRUB Bootloader
  • How To Spell Check With The Firefox Dictionary
  • Turn off Spatial Mode in Nautilus
  • How to take a screenshot without X (GUI), just from console
  • PHP and MySQL Essential Functions
  • A better way to create a customized Ubuntu Live USB drive
  • Installing FlyCast on Ubuntu Linux
  • howto: follow firefox 3.1 beta, trunk or final
  • Gentoofy your GRUB boot loader
  • Favorite Linux Shortcuts

Open source firmware for Broadcom wireless adapters

Filed under
Hardware
Software

lwn.net: Many people complain about the problem of binary firmware blobs; the folks at the OpenFWWF project are doing something about it.

2009: Year of the Linux Handheld?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxrevolution.blogspot: Although the number of PCs running Linux has increased each year, a new emergent trend is that Linux is becoming a popular on more consumer handheld devices.

Google Gets Chrome Ready For Mac, Linux

Filed under
Google
Software

informationweek.com: Google has released a pre-beta version of Chrome 2.0 that takes the Web browser closer to its eventual support of Mac OS X and Linux.

Firefox team stops collecting data to ensure user privacy

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: The Firefox team decided this week to stop collecting unique identifiers that link crash reports from the same user.

Linux Interview - Just when you thought you knew it all

Filed under
Linux

lifeoncastro.blogspot: I have recently found myself in a search for the perfect job. I think the perfect job is a Linux Systems Administration gig. The meat of this article is really to list out some of the most common questions I have been asked along this journey.

10 Questions about linux asked by windows users

Filed under
Linux

bablotech.com: As the popularity of linux increasing day by day but still there are lots of peoples using windows and still unaware about linux. I have listed 10 questions which most of windows user’s have in their mind.

Review: BBC iPlayer Desktop On The Linux

Filed under
Software

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: A significant piece of news which might have been drowned out by all that festive white noise was the release of the BBC iPlayer application for Linux and Mac platforms.

Linux and Sun events chopped as recession bites

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: It may be a popular Linux distro, but that's not enough to tempt fans of Ubuntu into traveling to the American northwest to get the latest low down.

Introducing KDE 4: Amarok 2.0

Filed under
Software

introducingkde4.blogspot: Finally, Amarok 2 has been released. The 1.x series were the champions on music management (on BSD and Linux) and playing during KDE 3.x time. Actually, it was preferred on all desktop environments, shells or plain windows managers.

Linux 2.6.28's five best features

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: While you were likely to be opening up Christmas presents, Linus Torvalds was giving Linux users around the world a special present: the release of the next major Linux kernel: Linux 2.6.28.

Windows 7 Beta Review

Filed under
Microsoft

theunixgeek.blogspot: So, I went onto MSDN, downloaded my copy of Windows 7 Beta (build 7000), and here are a few notes of what I think of the new version of Windows, specifically my overall impression of it.

Open Source In Obama's Tech Agenda

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: Much noise has been made in the past week or so about President-elect Barack Obama's creation of a governmental chief tech officer position. My question is: What will be their stance on open source? Will they lean towards it, mandate it, forbid it ... or ignore it entirely?

BadVista: We hardly knew ye

Filed under
Microsoft

fsf.org: "The fact that Microsoft has repeatedly extended XP cutoff deadlines and is releasing a public beta of Windows 7 today is proof of Vista's failure"

ASUS`s Eee Box Brings Atom to the Desktop

Filed under
Hardware

channelinsider.com: Asus offers a desktop PC that is designed for the world of Web 2.0 and green computing for under $320.

Update to openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE
  • Update to openSUSE 11.1

  • No Paradise
  • Unofficial KDE 3.5 Live CD for openSUSE 11.1
  • Upgrading to OpenSuSE 11.1 Some issues
  • Tips to openSUSE 11.1 the most usable ever

Intel Atom 2GB Memory Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Most netbooks currently on the market offer 512MB or 1GB of system memory and only a single DDR2 SO-DIMM slot. However, with most of the netbooks a 2GB memory module could be easily installed, but what performance benefits does that yield for an Intel Atom powered device?

Linux, PhotoShop, And Disney

Filed under
Software

oneclicklinux.com: I admit that many folks out there really prefer Photoshop over every other graphics app. Eve though the Gimp is as featured packed and as easy to use, folks just prefer Photoshop. Enter Disney.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Libjpeg-Turbo 2.0 Beta Brings More AVX2 SIMD, Improved CMake Build System
    A Phoronix reader recently pointed out that LibJPEG 2.0 Beta quietly shipped last month as working towards the next big update for this speed-focused JPEG library. Libjpeg-Turbo 2.0 beta is available for testing and it brings AVX2 SIMD support for colorspace conversion, chroma downsampling/upsampling, integer quantization and sample conversion, and integer DCT/IDCT algorithms. These AVX2 SIMD accelerated paths are generally bringing gains anywhere from 9% to 36% faster depending upon the operation. This version is also bringing SIMD acceleration for Huffman encoding on SSE2 CPUs and Loongson MMI SIMD implementations for more functions.
  • A look at Rancher 2.0
    Last December, we announced a Kubernetes Cloud Native Platform in partnership with Rancher Labs. Built on Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes and Rancher 2.0, the Cloud Native Platform will simplify enterprise usage of Kubernetes with seamless user management, access control, and cluster administration. Join our webinar to get a tour of the platform!
  • Mozilla's Common Voice Project, Red Hat Announces Vault Operator, VirtualBox 5.2.10 Released and More
    Participate in Mozilla's open-source Common Voice Project, an initiative to help teach machines how real people speak: "Now you can donate your voice to help us build an open-source voice database that anyone can use to make innovative apps for devices and the web."
  • Collabora Online 3.2 Supports Chart Creation, Other Features
    A new version of Collabora Online is now available, the web-based open-source office suite derived from the cloud version of LibreOffice.
  • DragonFlyBSD Kernel Gets Some SMP Improvements
    It looks like the DragonFlyBSD 5.4 release will be delivering at least a few kernel-level performance improvements. It turns out just hours after wrapping up the latest BSD vs. Linux benchmarks, Matthew Dillon pushed a few performance tweaks to the Git tree for DragonFly.
  • Best Open Source 3D Printers
    In simplest terms, an open source 3D printer refers to a 3D printer whose hardware and software information are available to the public, typically under a license. The information can be used by anyone to build, modify, or improve the 3D printer. If you’re looking for real open source 3D printers, then you’ve come to the right place. In this guide, we introduce you to completely open source 3D printers. The hardware and software information of all the products listed here can be easily found on the internet.

Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more