Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

IP attorney: Bankrupt or not, SCO case is 'boring'

Filed under
OSS

In this interview with SearchOpenSource.com, Tom Carey, an attorney with Boston-based Bromberg & Sunstein LLP, waxes nostalgic on the SCO trial -- where it was, what lessons it has taught users of Linux and open source software, and what SCO's rumored bankruptcy could mean for the major players.

Do you know KNetWalk?

Filed under
KDE
Gaming

You think that you know every game that KDE ships? How about KNetWalk? It's a nice little game - not just for system administrators. The chance that you have it already installed is high, it's in the kdegames module!

Ever wonder how IDC can do all those "studies"?

We all know IDC is basically a known "propaganda mercenary" for Microsoft...But did you know they're incredibly "efficient" in producing studies?

What's up with the annual Desktop Linux Summit?

Filed under
Linux

Linspire CEO Kevin Carmony, who introduced Freespire -- a no-cost version of Linspire's Linux distribution -- in his keynote address at last year's Summit, gave DesktopLinux.com the scoop on what's happening with this year's event.

Sound control on minimal setups

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu installs alsa-base and alsa-utils by default (as part of ubuntu-minimal), and provided you didn’t rip them out when you built your minimal system, you still have a nifty ncurses application for modifying sound settings: alsamixer.

Lightweight OS for my old hardware

Filed under
Linux

Here is my run-down of Linux distros that I have tried to run on my PIII 600mhz/128mb laptop.

First try - Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy)

There`s not much to say about this choice.

What it takes to make Ubuntu ready for use

Filed under
Ubuntu

I recently installed Ubuntu 6.10 on a new PC at work. In this post I will document all the steps I had to perform to get it ready for everyday use. Each step is assigned a level of difficulty, which I define below:

Webmin

Filed under
HowTos

Webmin is a modular web-based administration tool that works on a wide variety of Linux versions and other Unix and Unix-like operating systems. It enables you to log in via a web page and perform administration tasks. Webmin then “does the right thing” and makes the necessary appropriate changes to configuration files.

Open Source Needs More Concerted Efforts

Filed under
OSS

Major corporate houses choose open source partly due to the economic gains and mainly due to the control the open source system gives to their hands.

Linux quicktip - find and replace from the command line using sed

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve ever had to modify files on your Linux system and simply change a word or two, there’s a fast and simple way to do this using sed.

People Behind KDE: Daniel Molkentin

Filed under
KDE

For the next interview in the fortnightly People Behind KDE series we meet a developer who has unfinished business with midges, someone who prefers bullets to stars -- tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Daniel Molkentin.

Also: Amarok Weekly Newsletter - Issue 5

PCLinuxOS Reloaded and Rebranded 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

As some of you know, I own and operate mypclinuxos.com, which is a community projects website for PCLinuxOS. What some of you may not know is that PCLinuxOS held an official contest earlier last summer to select a new logo.

Peek through the Looking Glass with LG3D-LiveCD

Filed under
Linux

Sun's Project Looking Glass is a 3-D desktop environment for Linux, Windows, and Solaris. If you are interested in seeing what it offers but are not ready to install the packages directly on your system, you can still get a feel for the avant-garde interface with the just-released LG3D-LiveCD 3.0.

Interview with Firefox Founder and Creator Blake Ross

Filed under
Interviews

As Opera users we owe a lot of credit to Firefox for successfully bringing more awareness to alternative browsers. We benefited a great deal from it by having less compatibility issues with broken webpages. Hopefully this interview will show the best of what our communities have to offer. I’d like to personally ask to keep the trolling away – let’s set an example here.

Manage Your Personal accounts with Eqonomize

Filed under
HowTos

Eqonomize! is a personal accounting software, with focus on efficiency and ease of use for the small household economy. Eqonomize! provides a complete solution, with bookkeeping by double entry and support for scheduled recurring transactions, security investments, and budgeting.

Working with Partitions in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Each hard disk that you use in a Linux system will have a number of partitions on it (except in the rather rare cases when we write to raw disk devices).

FireFTP ftw!

Filed under
Moz/FF

FireFTP is probably one of the coolest plugins for Firefox I’ve ever seen. I’ve never liked gFTP; I find it slow, clunky and counterintuitive. Since I use Firefox at home and at work, the FireFTP extension is an absolute godsend.

How to internationalize your PHP apps

Filed under
News

Localizing an application can be planned, or it can happen as a rushed afterthought. Discover techniques and tools such as gettext, XML, XSLT, and design patterns that can help when retrofitting localization into a mature product or planning for localization up front.

Linux Standard Base plans cross-format package API

For independent software vendors (ISV), one of the major problems in supporting GNU/Linux is the variety of package management systems. However, if the Free Standards Group has its way, the next version of the Linux Standard Base (LSB) will solve that problem by providing an application programming interface (API) that acts as a bridge between the major package systems and software installers. Ian Murdock, CTO of the Free Standards Group, says the solution could be included in the most widely used distributions by early 2008.

Is HelixPlayer still alive?

Filed under
Software

I wonder what the state of RealPlayer, HelixPlayer in generel, is. As you might now, the HelixPlayer or the RealPlayer in its current version, 1.0.something (or RealPlayer 10.0.x) was released in its first version almost three years (!) ago. As you can see in this list there have been minor updates but none of them is really important.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Comic-Con and FOSS Comic Book Solutions
    After whetting his appetite at this year’s Comic-Con, our resident Linux newbie discovers free and open source apps for reading digital comics, as well as a treasure trove of available sources for free comics online.
  • Linux Kernel 3.12.62 LTS Improves SPARC Support, Updates the Networking Stack
    Linux kernel developer Jiri Slaby announced the release of the sixty-second maintenance update for the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series, which will receive support until 2017 because of SUSE Enterprise Linux. Linux kernel 3.12.62 LTS is a modest update, and looking at the diff from the previous maintenance release, version 3.12.61, we can notice that it changes a total of 96 files, with 1213 insertions and 1053 deletions. Among the changes, we can notice lots of fixes for the SPARC hardware architecture, but there are various other improvements for the ARM, MIPS, PA-RISC, and x86 instruction set architectures.
  • ‘Anatine’ Is a Simple Desktop Twitter App for Linux
    Anatine describes itself as a 'pristine Twitter app for Linux', but is it anything more than a wrapper around the mobile website?
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.3 Released With Small Bug Fixes
    A small bug fix update to Skype for Linux alpha is now available, and fixes, among many changes, errant close to tray behaviour on the Cinnamon desktop.
  • On the killing of intltool
    Say thanks to Daiki Ueno for his work maintaining gettext and enhancing it to make change practical, and to Javier Jardon for pushing this within GNOME and working to remove intltool from important GNOME modules.
  • On discoverability
    I've discussed elsewhere that usability is about real people doing real tasks in a reasonable amount of time. Some researchers also refer to "learnability" and "memorability" to define usability—this is very similar to discoverability. Can you discover the features of the system just by poking at it? Is the user interface obvious enough that you can figure it out on your own?
  • This is Lubuntu 16.10’s New Default Wallpaper
    The default wallpaper of Lubuntu 16.10 — yes, that's Lubuntu, with an 'l' — has been unveiled — but will fans of the lightweight Ubuntu spin like it?

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers