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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Preloaded Linux on Dell: Fact or Fiction?

Filed under
Linux

Having Linux preloaded on PCs from major vendors is a dream many in the Linux community have had for a long time. They have made significant Linux efforts for the enterprise and are involved in the Linux community in varying degrees. So why hasn't Linux appeared pre-loaded on PCs yet? It's simple: demand and dollars.

Is a Linux desktop avalanche coming?

Filed under
Linux

Slowly, ever so slowly, the Linux desktop has been picking up momentum. It keeps getting better and better, but Microsoft's monopoly has kept many PC users from realizing that there really is a viable alternative to Windows. However, that's about to change.

One-click email backup of OpenOffice.org documents

Filed under
HowTos

Gmail offers a few clever features that make it more than just an email service. You can use your Gmail account as a document viewer, a file storage, and even as a full-blown Getting Things Done solution. You can also turn Gmail into a nifty backup solution for your OpenOffice.org documents using a simple OOoBasic macro and Gmail's own tools.

The first political victory for open source

Filed under
OSS

The WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) Development Agenda is usually a great way to put folks to sleep, but this week it represents what may be the first political victory for open source.

Linux almost desktop ready

Filed under
Linux

AFTER MORE THAN two years I have decided to put Linux to the test again to see if it is ready to become a home desktop yet. Here is what I tried and the results. Included PCLOS, Freespire, Mepis, and Ubuntu.

Some common beginner Linux installation issues

Filed under
Linux

In this cursory overview, Mark Rais, provides some of the common reasons why people brand new to Linux have installation failures. The brief article covers issues with Fedora, Gentoo, Mepis, PCLinuxOS, and Ubuntu.

Installing Puppet on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Puppet is a configuration automation tool that allows you to centralize management of the various *nix flavors running on your network. This is a step by step tutorial on how to install the server component of Puppet (puppetmaster) on one machine, and the Puppet client (puppetd) on another. We then perform a simple test to make sure Puppet is working properly.

Why Dell and other major hardware vendors won't do desktop Linux preinstallation

Filed under
Linux

The big problem with Linux preinstallation is that one size rarely fits all. Although modern community-driven distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora are designed for a broad audience, serious Linux users are very particular about how their systems are configured.

Linux: 2.6.21-rc2, Lots of Changes

Filed under
Linux

Announcing 2.6.21-rc2, Linus Torvalds noted, "I'm not very proud of this, because quite frankly, -rc2 has way more changes than I really like." The current Linux kernel development model is that the bulk of changes in a new kernel should happen during the -rc1 phase, with the rest of the -rc kernels being primarily bug fixes."

Mac vs. Linux: Which is More Secure?

Filed under
OS

In last month’s column, I said “I’m more secure on a Mac than I was on Windows XP.” Some of you asked how Linux fares in that comparison. To that, I’ll say I’m marginally more secure on Linux than on a Mac.

What Tech Companies Should Know About Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

It happened again this week. This time it was Dell, who asked the public what they'd like to see Dell offering. The overwhelming number-one response was "Linux machines". Then the inevitable foot-dragging began.

Securing Linux by breaking it with Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

Damn Vulnerable Linux (DVL) is everything a good Linux distribution isn't. Its developers have spent hours stuffing it with broken, ill-configured, outdated, and exploitable software that makes it vulnerable to attacks. DVL isn't built to run on your desktop -- it's a learning tool for security students

Run Windows Apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer

Filed under
HowTos

I recently read an article describing how to run Windows apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer with Windows running as a virtual machine (VM) on the local system. It's a really cool sounding idea and overcomes some of the compatibility problems of Wine, but always having a Windows VM active consumes a lot of resources and may not always be the best solution.

Killing misbehaving programs and processes

Filed under
HowTos

I’d love to say it doesn’t happen on Linux, but very rarely it does. I can say it happens less often than on Windows, though. What am I talking about? Programs and processes misbehaving - locking up, stopping working and generally causing a problem.

Most popular websites 6 out of 7 powered by GNU/Linux - concludes survey

Filed under
Linux

Pingdom - an uptime monitoring company conducted a survey recently where it researched the technologies that power 7 most popular websites. All these websites except Alexaholic, exclusively use Linux as their choice of OS. Alexaholic is hosted on Windows.

Fedora Linux Leaves Its Users Behind?

Filed under
Linux

Those of you who are outside of the Linux circle of influences must have heard about Eric Raymond's rejection of Fedora. But if you ask me, the really interesting thing has been the public reaction to his comments in, well, the reader comments area of the article.

Also: The Terrible State of WiFi in Linux

beryl: usability, part 6

Filed under
HowTos

This is a quick howto on a not-so-well-known feature of beryl - drag and drop using the scale plugin.

Also: Tweak beryl for speed

So, How Does it Feel to have been Had?

Filed under
Linux

Mike Dell fires his CEO, takes control of Dell again and starts "A New Era of Innovation." He has his people put up a website asking US what we want in a Dell Computer. In no particular order, the tens of thousands of responses were:

Also: Linux and Dell - getting there?
And: Dell backs down from Linux promise

How to dual boot Linux and Windows XP (Linux installed first)

Filed under
HowTos

We're going to use the Gnome Partition Editor (Gparted) from the Ubuntu LiveCD to shrink the Ubuntu partition on the hard disk and create enough space for an installation of XP. We'll then install XP, and, because XP overwrites the master boot record, we'll restore the GRUB boot loader so that either XP or Linux can be selected at boot time.

UK government ignores open-source potential

Filed under
OSS

John Pugh MP argues that a bias against open-source within Whitehall has lead to schools and universities becoming too focused on proprietary technology.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • The Begining
    The friendship/relationship with the awesome community of GNOME begins. What followed after 2 commits into the main branch, one application submission, and the result was the start of the most amazing few months. These months have been a humbling experience, the biggest learning experience, and the most productive time.
  • GTK+ Tester Window?
    For an internal application, I’ve created a Gtk.Window derived tester class, added some widgets to show current test, status, number of fails and a Gtk.Grid to attach custom widgets. This class expose some API to set a widget to test, autoclose and some signals you can use to run some tests.
  • GUADEC 2016
    A lot of great things happened – as always GUADEC with it’s perfect size got me to speak to a hell lot of new and interesting people. Thank you all for being there – it was a pleasure.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • #MyOpenHA Part 1 -Philosophy
    Home Automation. The holy hipster and geek grail. I have played with it. I have tried. I have failed. But today I am proud to have a solution I can truly endorse. So join me on this journey. This series will explain my solution, in excruciating detail. In the hope that I can learn from you while I am explaining. This series will be filled over time with more and more articles. But now, let’s talk about philosophy. The Why. Soon you will see the What and How. One promise, or the TL;DR: It is all 100% Open Source. Well, almost. I have integrated some quite non-open things but always in an Open Source Way.
  • Disable the new Firefox 48 location bar - Tutorial
    Here we are. Seven minutes later, our life is bearable again, but not perfect. Thank you Mozilla, thank you very much. This is exactly what I needed to enrich my life. After all, we all know, cosmetic changes are good, because that's what plants crave. Stop with these idiotic tweaks please. No one cares. It won't make the browser better. It won't change the market share. It will not attract idiots, as idiots are happy. It will only alienate diehard users who keep on using your browser because they have no alternative. From a loved favorite to the least of evils choice. That's what Firefox has become.
  • What’s Happening in OpenStack-Ansible (WHOA) – August 2016
    My goal with these posts is to inform more people about what we’re doing in the OpenStack-Ansible community and bring on more contributors to the project.
  • PowerShell on Linux? No, Thank You [comic]
  • LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)
    There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures. AAP is designed for FPGA usage and there is an open-source soft-core with commercial deployments also being available. AAP is short for the Altruistic Processor and is described in technical detail here. AAP is said to be an original design but inspired by the OpenRISC / RISC-V projects.
  • UK-French Data Taskforce publishes joint report
    "Invest in and share experiences building core data registers, learning from the French National Address Database experience”; “develop initiatives to bring basic data literacy into primary and secondary education”; and “commission research into algorithmic transparency and accountability” are among the recommendations listed in a report published in July by the joint French-UK Data Taskforce.
  • Tuscany: how to promote the economy of sharing and collaboration
    In June, the region of Tuscany (Italy), in collaboration with Open Toscana and ANCI Toscana, launched a project, the goal of which is to “build a regional policy on the economy of sharing and collaboration”.
  • MS Tries But Just Doesn’t Get FLOSS
    This is what drove me to GNU/Linux so many years ago.
  • Microsoft's maps lost Melbourne because it used bad Wikipedia data
    Microsoft has laid part of the blame for Bing Maps' mis-location of the Australian city of Melbourne by a whole hemisphere on Wikipedia. Yes, Wikipedia, “the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit.” Microsoft made its admission after your correspondent took to Twitter on Monday to do what we in publishing call “pimping"the story of Melbourne's mis-placement. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, noticed that pimping and responded as follows.
  • Northern Ireland promotes Open Data in education
    The Northern Ireland Department of Finance has supported a challenge that encourages the re-use of public Open Data in education. Called the OpenDataNI Challenge – Using Open Data for Education” (ODNI4EDU), this project, officially launched on June 14, intends to award two applications or educational tools and resources that make use of at least one dataset published on the portal OpendataNI.
  • Try this handy tool to convert a Web site into a native app with Electron
  • Introducing CloudiumOS [Ed: built on Electron]
    It is a complete multi platform operating system that allows you to manage your documents, access your media files and collaborate with other people on the go. CloudiumOS can work side-by-side with another operating system (either via a VM, a Desktop app or Mobile App) or as a standalone installation.

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers