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Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Making sense of the new features in LibreOffice 4.1 srlinuxx 04/06/2013 - 5:06am
Story New Email Client on the Way? srlinuxx 04/06/2013 - 5:04am
Story Ode to Machine Architecture srlinuxx 1 04/06/2013 - 4:56am
Story Linux Mint 15 Cinnamon srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 10:25pm
Story How Microsoft shattered Gnome's unity with Windows 95 srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 10:24pm
Story ZorinOS – Gateway to Linux for Windows Users srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 8:04pm
Story Linux Mint 15 Olivia MATE review srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 8:02pm
Story What happened to Linux? srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 6:44pm
Story The University of Linux srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 6:43pm
Story A house divided: Linux factions threaten success srlinuxx 03/06/2013 - 6:42pm

Obtaining file information with RPM

Filed under
HowTos

Vincent Danen: RPM (the Red Hat Package manager) is the most widely-used package manager on Linux systems. One of RPM’s strengths is the variety of options it provides to verify file information, reset file information, and so on.

Swedish pharmacies fight fevers with Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Linux Log: Apoteket, the Swedish State Pharmacy and Sweden’s largest state-owned pharmacy chain, has chosen to replace all of its servers at approximately 900 pharmacies with Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Open source pleased to see Microsoft in European legal hot water

Filed under
Microsoft

Linux-Watch: "Schadenfreude" is a German word meaning to take pleasure in the trouble of others. It's perfect for describing how open-source companies and supporters feel about Microsoft's failure to overturn the European Commission's decision that Microsoft has acted as a monopoly.

Also: EU vs Microsoft: the morning after

2.6.23-rc6-mm1, "This Just Isn't Working Any More"

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A frustrated sounding Andrew Morton released the 2.6.23-rc6-mm1 kernel as "a 29MB diff against 2.6.23-rc6." Many patches are merged first into Andrew's -mm tree for testing before being pushed to Linus' mainline tree during the merge window.

PC-BSD Day 13: The KOffice workspace

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Where Kontact is a shell around various communications applications for the KDE desktop, KOffice is a shell around the productivity applications. During install PC-BSD gives you the opportunity to install OpenOffice.org and that you need to do.

Open Source Driver for ATI Radeon R5xx/R6xx

Filed under
Software
SUSE

opensuse news: AMD has recently released register specifications for the ATI Radeon R5xx and R6xx graphic devices. Engineers from Novell have now released a first alpha quality Open Source driver which currently supports initial mode settings. Next steps are adding support for more hardware, RandR 1.2 support, video overlay support and 2D acceleration.

Lack of license fee draws UK firms to open source

CBR: Open source software is gaining traction in key UK industries, as freedom from license costs and vendor tie-in lure companies away from the proprietary path.

Also: Reason 54,872 to use Linux

Don't fork Linux because of Linus

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I recently read a blog entry on InfoWorld.com that urged the Linux community to fork the kernel into desktop and server versions because, according to the author, all Linus Torvalds cares about is big iron. Sorry, but that's both wrong and stupid.

Easy blogging with Pivot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GPL-licensed Pivot blogging software stands out among blogging applications because it requires no database, no extra libraries, and minimal installation effort. While it's still in an early stage of development, its flexibilty and the ease with which it can be set up make it ideal for those new to maintaining their own blogging Web sites.

We don't need a fractured Linux.

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: There is a big problem in the FOSS world. Especially with Linux. That problem is every group considers themselves to be on their own little island and only wish to concern themselves with their territory.

Dell's Desktop Linux Strategy: So Far, So Good

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: So far, so good. That statement sums up Dell's (DELL) current desktop Linux strategy, which focuses heavily on the Ubuntu operating system from Canonical.

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.

Mint Linux: The way Linux was meant to be

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: I've had a couple of folks tell me to try out Mint Linux. Last night, I downloaded Celena BETA 017. Tonight, I burned the CD and booted it up on europa.

Debating Distributed Block Devices

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I'm pleased to announce [the] fourth release of the distributed storage subsystem, which allows [you] to form a storage [block device] on top of remote and local nodes, which in turn can be exported to another storage [block device] as a node to form tree-like storage [block devices]."

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS

  • Is Ubuntu for You?
  • Does Microsoft matter any more?
  • Mozilla's New Focus on Thunderbird and Internet Communications
  • Will Linux Steal Apple's Thunder?
  • Why Windows Users Are Insane

Testing Compiz Fusion under Mandriva 2008.0 RC1

Filed under
MDV

Fabrice Facorat: After my proposal for having a customized Compiz Fusion in Mandriva 2008.0, I decide to activate Compiz and play a little with some of the settings. I tried to keep the settings simple in order to have a beautiful but also an efficient 3D desktop.

ATI Radeon HD 2900XT Powered By Open-Source Driver

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix: The open-source Avivo driver is currently bound to supporting the ATI R500 GPU family and with efforts now being focused on the RadeonHD driver, this reverse-engineered driver will likely never support the newer GPUs. Inside our labs we tried out the Radeon HD 2900XT with the RadeonHD driver on Fedora 7.

Linux coders crack Apple's iPod Touch

Filed under
Linux

Programmers have bypassed a new difficulty in providing Linux support for the latest-generation iPods.

Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Ubuntu Linux on a flash drive and run it under Windows

  • OOo: Your basic everyday sorting
  • Installing C++ Boost 1.34.1 on Slackware/Zenwalk
  • Delete files securely with shred
  • Memcached 1.2.2 on Debian Etch
  • Pretty Emacs Reloaded
  • quickly resize or rotate images within nautilus
  • Screencast HOWTO under Mandriva
  • Installing The RadeonHD Driver On Ubuntu

Introducing The RadeonHD Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Not only is AMD providing the open-source community with their ATI GPU specifications, but they have also been partnering with Novell on the development of a new open-source display driver. We've been telling you about AMD's open-source work all month, and today the new driver is finally available for download. In this article we have some initial information to share.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing
    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.
  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper
    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.
  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released
    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0! qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform. I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!
  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support
    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.
  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers
    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."