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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Neptune 4.0 Wants to Be the Best KDE-Based OS Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:46pm
Story Video Interview: Werner Knoblich, VP & GM EMEA – Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:36pm
Story Huawei Honor 6 Review: new flagship smartphone with Kirin 920 octa-core processor Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:27pm
Story NEW CINNAMON STABLE UBUNTU PPAS [UBUNTU 14.04 AND 12.04] Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 12:45pm
Story Rygel 0.23.1 Is a Powerful and Free DLNA Media Server for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 12:39pm
Story Last Nexus 6 coming later this year with a 5.5-inch screen Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 12:35pm
Story GNOME Shell 3.13.3 Features Improved Behavior of Window Buttons Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:31am
Story Firefox and GTK+ 3 Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:28am
Story Canonical: A company in dire need of a clear objective Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:25am
Story Black Lab Linux 5.1 Alpha Ditches Mac OS Look Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:20am

Top 10 Firefox Extensions to Impress Your Friends

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: Firefox extensions are often lauded for the additional features and functionality that they bring to the browser. Today we’re going to flaunt what the developers have given us. That’s right, it’s time to tell your friends that your browser is better than theirs.

I'm on the Verge of Leaving Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

ibeentoubuntu.com: I started with Ubuntu on the day of their first release, having come from Debian. I've been loyal since then. I spent countless hours on teh forums working with people to help them get settled into Ubuntu. I wrote howtos for the wiki and for this blog. I guess I'll be back to Debian tomorrow.

Also: Giving up on Hardy... for now

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Hardware Compatibility List. Know It, Love It

  • Who is The VAR Guy?
  • Working With Arrays - Porting Between Linux Or Unix Using Bash, Perl, C and Awk
  • Linux Users: Why Did You Switch?
  • Gentoo Foundation Reinstated
  • Need a generic iptables tcp proxy?
  • Open source software player sets up in Dublin
  • XP's end: Another reason to look at Linux
  • A caution about Drupal as a social software platform
  • Howto: Fix compiz display white screen when locked issue in Ubuntu Hardy

Next Ubuntu LTS in 2010, unless Linuxes synchronize

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Mark Shuttleworth, head of Canonical and founder of the Ubuntu project, has called on other Linux developers to synchronize releases of new versions of their distros.

The 2008 Google SoC: 21 Projects I'm Excited About

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: The annual Google Summer of Code is upon us again. This is where great projects like the GDebiKDE installer were created. And this year looks even better than before, with 175 organizations and 1125 students. So today, I’m going to do a short rundown of some of my favorites.

UK education agency nixes OOXML

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com: Brits Want Microsoft Office 2007 Expelled From Classrooms. Instead of Open XML, BECTA wants the EU to compel Microsoft to support open standards, such as the Open Document Format.

New Fedora 9 makes waves by emphasizing contributors

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Fedora distribution has a reputation for innovation, and the new Fedora 9, released today, is no exception. But for Paul W. Frields, who became Fedora project leader in February, what distinguishes the release is less the technology than the community that supports it, and how the technology contributes to the larger free software world.

Linux gains action RPG

Filed under
Software
Gaming

desktoplinux.com: Linux Game Publishing has announced a Linux port of "Sacred Gold," an action role-playing game first published for Windows three years ago. The U.K.-based game publisher plans to ship the title in August of this year, priced at 27 GBP (~ $50).

Totem Movie Player can play YouTube Videos

Filed under
Software

linuxdesk.wordpress: It’s installed by default in Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 and works fabulously! Totem Movie Player now includes a plug-in for searching and playing You Tube videos without leaving the player and without Flash.

OpenSSL & OpenSSH Vulnerabilities : Confirm & Fix Instructions

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu-tutorials.com: I’m sure many of you have heard by this point that there is a reported vulnerability in openSSL and openSSH. Security patches have been deployed to the Ubuntu archives so the first step is to, of course, apply any security patches available. Am I Affected?

Mozilla and Flock stuff

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Customising Firefox 3

  • Flock 1.2 Beta Includes Digg Integration
  • Mozilla Developer News May 13

Open Source Security Myths Dispelled

Filed under
OSS

itproportal.com: Many IT professionals can’t seem to shake off the belief that OSS is inherently risky unreliable and complex. I am going to examine the most common of these perceptions to highlight how the facts are very often the exact opposite to what people believe.

Flipping the Linux switch: My OS is okay, your OS is okay

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: All right, let's quit the touchy-feely psycho-babble talk. There is a lot written about choosing distributions, desktops, and other fun stuff that comes with Linux. But how do you really know if it's something you want to invest time in trying at all?

ReactOS no threat to Windows

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: ReactOS is an implementation of Windows Server 2003, still in alpha stage, and very interesting. But it is no threat to Windows. None at all. Especially compared with Linux. Here's why.

OpenOffice.org obeys Moore's Law?

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: Let's compare these laws against OpenOffice.org to see which law wins. We'll measure the installed disk usage of OpenOffice.org for Linux in English as built by Sun Microsystems. The size of OpenOffice.org installation over time fits a linear equation with R2 = 0.858 and an expoential curve with R2 = 0.876: that means it is predictable like Kryder's Law.

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 6: The Black Hand

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: Have you noticed that the differences in major computer platforms really do seem to make them like different countries? The different ways we do things like run system tasks, open files, shut down and restart, have different file formats and character schemes and default fonts.

more Fedora stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora 9 Released with KDE 4.0.3

  • Fedora 9 Gives Ubuntu a Run For Its Money
  • Hats off to Fedora 9
  • Red Hat lives on the edge with Fedora 9
  • First Look at Sulphur, Fedora 9
  • Promoting Fedora the Blurbuntoo way

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu KDE4 Remix: An Ubuntu User’s View

  • 5 types of people who should be using Ubuntu
  • Week 1 with Ubuntu 8.04LTS

Open letter to standards professionals, developers, and activists

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You’ve read how Microsoft drove its tank through the international standardization process last year and this year, finally winning ISO approval for its legacy OOXML format. The OOXML event proved that we’re in a real fight, and that money and power can break down the existing polite rules and agreements that constitute the international standardization process.

NYSE Euronext banks on Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: If anyone out there persists in believing that Linux isn't ready for serious prime time, NYSE Euronext's dependence on Red Hat should finally lay that silly notion to rest.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%