Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 4:50am
Story LibreOffice Developer Interview: KOHEI YOSHIDA srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 12:19am
Story Machinarium for Linux [Review] srlinuxx 30/11/2012 - 12:15am
Story Interview with Ryan C. Gordon about Linux Gaming srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 11:43pm
Story Interview with Linus Torvalds from Linux Format 163 srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 11:41pm
Story Dell ships XPS 13 laptop with Ubuntu srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 8:14pm
Story Introduction to GIMP image editing tool with simple demos srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 8:08pm
Story Half Of The World's Largest Supercomputer Clusters Run SUSE srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 8:02pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 5:23pm
Story UEFI booting srlinuxx 29/11/2012 - 5:10pm

Why We Need a $200 Linux Notebook in the US

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: Without a question, having access to a truly entry level notebook like this one running Linux is going to make a lot of lower income families very happy. Ringing in at $189 USD, this provides users looking for a click and type workstation for a very reasonable cost.

Configure & Customize The Toolbars in Opera

Filed under
Software

CyberNews: Opera is a free web browser that is available for the Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems. One of the things that Opera is best known for is being highly customizable out-of-the-box, but I think that some people overlook how customizable the toolbars are.

Are we finally seeing the year of the Linux desktop?

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: This past month has seen a flurry activity from a number of players in the Linux desktop space. Red Hat, Suse, Ubuntu, Dell, Lenovo and even Intel white box system builders are getting into the act. Is the year of the Linux desktop finally upon us or is this just another flare up generated by the Linuxworld conference in San Francisco?

Inside KDE - The Trash System

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: In KDE there are a wide number of very visible and useful applications that people use every day. We've already covered some of these in our "The Lesser Apps of KDE" series, in this series we plan to dig a little deeper and bring out a lot of other great things about KDE you may not know about. In our first article today, we're going to look at KDE's trash system.

Use Linux over Windows with Xming

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: One of the nice things about the X Window System is its ability to display X apps running remotely on a local machine. One of the not-so-nice things about Microsoft Windows is the complete lack of native support for displaying X applications. If you find yourself working on Windows but wanting to use Linux apps at the same time, Xming can do the job.

Today's Left-Overs:

Filed under
News
  • QuakeCon Wrapup (& Carmack Interview)

  • Open Source Projects and Corporations
  • Linux database becomes a browser
  • Why doesn’t kudzu ask me to setup a new network card on system start?
  • Mandriva Linux 2008 Beta 1 'Cassini'
  • Merging "Open Source" and "Free Software"

Multisite CVS Drupal Installation on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This howto shows you how to do a multi-site Drupal install on Ubuntu. It also covers how to layout your directories for ease of maintenance, and how to ensure that you can update Drupal easily from CVS.

Safeguarding Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

techzone: A friend of mine has Fedora, with Security enhanced Linux kernel. I thought that was an overkill for desktop use. We started a debate on this and decided to check our system against vulnerabilities. Now it was a matter of "my computer" vs "his computer".

And: The quickest way to keying an SSH login
And: How to Install the Eternity Screensaver in Ubuntu

KRename: powerful renaming tool

Filed under
Software

Debian Package of the Day: KRename is a powerful batch renaming tool for KDE that allows to rename lots of files in one step. The design of the program is suitable for both advanced and novice users.

New widget library for GNOME includes transparent radial menu and other bling

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Karl Lattimer has created an experimental radial menu widget for GNOME called Fittsmenu. The Fittsmenu widget still has some glitches, but it is an impressive demonstration of the potential for practical GNOME user interface enhancements that support visually attractive features like transparency.

6 Reasons I Don’t Use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxbraindump.org: According to Distrowatch, the top spot in the the world of Linux distributions belongs to Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS, with Fedora routinely coming in at fourth or fifth. So why don’t I use Ubuntu if it’s supposed to be the best?

And: Ubuntu Linux: The New Linux Standard for the Desktop – Or Just Wishful Thinking?

TinyMe Test 5 released!

Filed under
PCLOS

mypclinuxos.com: TinyMe test 5 has been released! If you liked test 4.1, you’re going to love test 5. Smile I am really excited about this release. A lot of late night hours and hard work have gone into test 5. This will hopefully be our last test release before TinyMe Final.

And: PCLinuxOS 2007 Install Notes

Dell expands Linux PC sales to Europe, China

Filed under
Linux

Reuters: Dell Inc said on Tuesday it has decided to expand sales of consumer personal computers loaded with the Linux operating system to the United Kingdom, France, Germany and China.

Also: Dell Eyes PCs Running Linux, Windows At Same Time
And: Dell Talks Linux Virtualization Redux
And: SUSE Linux to be offered Pre-Installed on Dells in China

Wolvix 1.1 Hunter Review

Filed under
Linux

I am not sure how will it work out for advanced desktop users, as lot of them will have preferences regarding KDE and GNOME. But for an average desktop perspective it is really great distro which runs really well on older computer.

EnGarde — Secure Linux Server

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

polishlinux: This will be an unusual review, due to the fact that the distribution under review doesn’t have an X server, and you don’t really need to login on it to work… This review is about EnGarde Secure Server 3.0.16 developed by Guardian Digital company with the help of the community.

Fedora 7: Community remix

Filed under
Linux

red hat mag: One of the popular features of Fedora 7 is the ability to remix Fedora and build your own custom version. Now don’t get me wrong–building a new distribution is nice. But what about those who wish to create their own Fedora-based project?

The 64-Bit Experience With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Caitlyn Martin: Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been able to borrow a friend’s laptop. She has the 64-bit version of Ubuntu Feisty Fawn installed. This is my first chance to play with 64-bit Linux extensively on a laptop.

Liferea

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Feed technology is great - it allows you to have your favourite sites to keep you updated with the latest content and push it out to you. There are many different reader applications out there, from the web-based, to the desktop and even in the mobile space. One such desktop application for Linux and other Unix platforms is Liferea.

Big savings with Linux desktop: IBM, Novell

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: IBM and Novell are set to do battle with Microsoft on the desktop with the launch of a new open-source software bundle that promises savings for users.

Editing music scores with free software

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Not everyone needs to work with music scores on their computers, but if you're someone who does enter, edit, or store sheet music electronically, you can choose among many free software options.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla News

  • How to get started contributing to Mozilla
    Open source participation offers a sea of benefits that can fine-tune and speed up your career in the tech, including but not limited to real-world technical experience and expanding your professional network. There are a lot of open source projects out there you can contribute to—of small, medium, and large size, as well as unknown and popular. In this article we'll focus on how to contribute to one of the largest and most popular open source projects on the web: Mozilla.
  • Digital Citizens, Let’s Talk About Internet Health
    Today, Mozilla is launching the prototype version of the Internet Health Report. With this open-source research project, we want to start a conversation with you, citizens of the Internet, about what is healthy, unhealthy, and what lies ahead for the Internet. When I first fell in love with the Internet in the mid-1990s, it was very much a commons that belonged to everyone: a place where anyone online could publish or make anything. They could do so without asking permission from a publisher, a banker or a government. It was a revelation. And it made me — and countless millions of others — very happy. Since then, the Internet has only grown as a platform for our collective creativity, invention and self expression. There will be five billion of us on the Internet by 2020. And vast swaths of it will remain as open and decentralized as they were in the early days. At least, that’s my hope. Yet when Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg shows up on the cover of The Economist depicted as a Roman emperor, I wonder: is the Internet being divided up into a few great empires monopolizing everyday activities like search, talking to friends or shopping? Can it remain truly open and decentralized?
  • Mozilla ditches the dinosaur, unveils new branding only a nerd could love
    The old Netscape browser had a dinosaur named Mozilla as its mascot and codename. When the browser was open sourced in 1998, it used the dinosaur's name and visage as its branding.
  • Mozilla releases The Internet Health Report, an open-source document with version 1.0 coming by year end

GNU/Linux Desktop

  • Are You Ready For Linux?
    Linux on the Desktop is well past the stage of being a plaything for computer hobbyists but it still isn’t at the stage where it could be considered completely mainstream. There’s still some way to go but Linux is fast gaining ground at an accelerating pace and lots of folks are looking at it as a serious alternative to Windows and Mac. People tend to bring some misconceptions about hardware and software to the table when they seek advice and support as they contemplate making the switch. In this article, I will address a few of the most common complaints I get from folks who come to me for help getting started with Linux. I try to be up-front and honest about what Linux can and can’t do for them but I also am quick to point out that the surest way to have a bad experience with Linux is to approach it too quickly.
  • Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up
    Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. [...] In this article, we discussed the feasibility of creating an entry level home recording studio for under $1,000. In the next article of this series, we will start to look at the software needed to turn our collection of hardware into a fully operational recording studio. We will install Ubuntu Studio, a Linux-based operating system that is made for audio recording, and extend its functionality with the software repositories from KXstudio. Looking forward to seeing you.
  • Lunduke Hour: Jan-17-2017, Dell Linux Hardware w/Barton George

KDE Leftovers

  • Get Yourself on www.kde.org
  • Which OpenGL implementation is my Qt Quick app using today?
    Qt Quick-based user interfaces have traditionally been requiring OpenGL, quite unsurprisingly, since the foundation of it all, the Qt Quick 2 scenegraph, is designed exclusively with OpenGL ES 2.0 (the top of the line for mobile/embedded at the time) in mind. As you may have heard, the graphics API story is a bit more inclusive in recent Qt versions, however the default OpenGL-based rendering path is, and is going to be, the number one choice for many applications and devices in the future. This raises the interesting question of OpenGL implementations.
  • Should you still be using QGraphicsView?
    There was a time when the Qt Graphics View Framework was seen as the solution to create modern user interfaces with Qt. Now that Qt Quick 2 has matured does the Graphics View Framework still have a place in Qt?
  • Google Code In ( Gcompris ) 2106-2017
    This year's Google Code In was awesome as before . There were instances of tasks successfully completed by the students . Out of 12 unique tasks 11 tasks were successfully attempted . The students were enthusiastic till the very end of the program. Most of the students solved multiple tasks that provided us with varied ideas .

Red Hat News