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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open Source Internet Utilities - Part 2

Filed under
Software

cybercapital.org: This is the Part 2 of 3 Open Source Internet Freeware list. Hope you’ll find them Useful.

GRUB bootloader - Full tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: One of the most frightening things about Linux is the horrible word bootloader. The primary reason for this is the fact that most new Linux users have only ever used Windows operating systems. In the Windows world, they have never bothered with bootloaders. This article is supposed to provide you with basic understanding of the GRUB bootloader.

The 0.11 Release

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "This version has a lot of corrections, and is stable at least on my machine," noted Linus Torvalds in the 0.11 Linux kernel release announcment, "I /hope/ every known bug is fixed, but no promises (and all unknown bugs are still there, probably with reinforcements ;-)".

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation.

Linux's Free System Is Now Easier to Use, But Not for Everyone

Filed under
Ubuntu

Wall Street Journal: I have steered away from recommending Linux, however, I've received a steady stream of emails from readers urging me to take a look at a variant of Linux called Ubuntu, which, these folks claimed, is finally polished enough for a mainstream user to handle.

The real measure of Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: There are so many stories floating around the internet about how Linux is increasing its adoption here or is losing its hold there and every day those ratio's change. There is a much simpler and closer to home method of measuring Linux adoption and you don't even need an internet connection.

PC-BSD Day 8: Demons and Pirates?

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: It may seem like I am only busy with software management in this first week and the impression is correct. The graphical workspace -KDE by default on PC-BSD- is something I will focus on later, but first I wanted to delve into something I had no prior knowledge of.

Three addictive pop-up console utilities

Filed under
Software

linux.com: I do development work, and I require access to a console to run programs, check output, or monitor transmission packets. Up until now, I've used a terminal program in a different desktop, and use the mouse to change to that terminal. Now I've found a quicker way, by using any of three Quake-style consoles that pop up just by pressing a key.

Firefox Gets BitTorrent

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews: BitTorrent is one of the most popular mechanisms for peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. For the most part BitTorrent client applications have been standalone tools, but now, thanks to open source startup AllPeers, Firefox users can take advantage of BitTorrent inside of their browsers.

Desktop Linux - A Passionate Analysis

Filed under
Linux

linuxevangelist.blogspot: Having read numerous articles about the current Desktop War that is going on; as GNU/Linux enthusiasts, developers and administrators writing mega bytes of articles, blogs and reports on amazing capabilities and caliber of GNU/Linux in Desktop and justify their theories and predictions on it's future, I decided to write my own Blog about what I like in Desktops and my reasons to believe that GNU/Linux satisfies those reasons fairly well though improvements are always there.

Tip: Travel with your Linux Firewall in your pocket

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Tip: Yoggie has developed a small device with a powerful 520 Mhz Intel Processor that fits in your pocket. It looks like a USB Memory Stick but it runs a complete hardened Linux-based Operating System inside. The solution combines a statefull inspection firewall and NAT combined with other security applications like Proxies, Anti-Virus, Spyware- and SPAM Protection.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • i promise i'm not trying to start a flame war

  • Ubuntu Fails to Impress
  • Listadmin: command line mailman moderator queue manipulation
  • Sabayon: miniEditions update and semi-prepared path towards 3.4+ release
  • South Africa's Open Source Software Market
  • Anonymous browsing with JAP
  • Nseer ERP 6.0 isn't fully baked
  • 12 Tips for GNOME Users
  • Running Compiz Fusion on OpenSuse 10.3, its possible!
  • Linux is the road to success
  • Canonical and VMware team on mini-Ubuntu
  • Why David Beckham should not play for Team Open Source
  • Discussion around Upstart’s future
  • Atheros Driver Developments

Price up, specs down for low-cost Linux notebook?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices: As its ship date nears, the price is rising and the specs dropping on Asus's ultra-low-cost, flash-based Linux notebook, according to reports. The EEE PC (3ePC), introduced at Computex, Taipei in June, is now expected to start at about $250, rather than the $190 originally targeted.

Ubuntu Technical Board votes on Compiz for Ubuntu 7.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The Ubuntu Technical Board voted yesterday to ship Ubuntu 7.10 ("Gutsy") with Compiz enabled by default. Although Compiz has been featured in Ubuntu 7.10 Tribe prerelesases, the board has had difficulty determining whether or not it is reliable and functionally complete enough to warrant inclusion in the final release.

Five Easter Eggs for Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor: I have compiled a list of five easter eggs that I came accross over time. Most of them has been around for as long as you can remember but I though it would be fun to compile a list of all the Linux Easter eggs with screen shots.

GTK1.2 doesn’t have to be ugly

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: There are better, more refined GTK1.2 looks around the Internet, but considering my previous attempts (which I refuse to show), this isn’t too bad.

Why the Linux Desktop will succeed despite itself

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: If you expect me to argue with the 13 reasons Kim Brebach gives for why the Linux desktop is unlikely to make it to a desktop near you any time soon, prepare to be disappointed. He's right.

The free software journalism club

Filed under
Misc

jem report: After I posted yesterday's call for stories from or about people who claim to have had comment posts deleted from Groklaw, I received an email from Pamela Jones asking me why I was "doing this." Since such a question presumes a certain level of conspiracy, I replied that the call for stories is self-explanatory. The next email I got on the subject was from Ziff Davis Enterprise editor Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols.

Over 130 line up for inaugural Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.nz: Among the 130-plus nominations for the inaugural Open Source Awards are a film project, a Hurricane Katrina disaster-help website and Pharmac’s open source publishing system for the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

Hosted apps helping to drive open source

Filed under
OSS

vnunet: An increase in the use of hosted applications such as webmail and Google Apps is driving the adoption of open source software behind the scenes.

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More in Tux Machines

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more

Digital audio and video editing in GNU/Linux

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstation Roundup
    In the world of home studio recording, the digital audio workstation is one of the most important tools of the trade. Digital audio workstations are used to record audio and MIDI data into patterns or tracks. This information is then typically mixed down into songs or albums. In the Linux ecosystem, there is no shortage of Digital audio workstations to chose from. Whether you wish to create minimalist techno or full orchestral pieces, chances are there is an application that has you covered. In this article, we will take a brief look into several of these applications and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. I will try to provide a fair evaluation of the DAWs presented here but at the end of the day, I urge you to try a few of these applications and to form an opinion of your own.
  • Shotcut Video Editor Available As A Snap Package [Quick Update]
    Shotcut is a free, open source Qt5 video editor developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework (it's developed by the same author as MLT), available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Under the hood, Shotcut uses FFmpeg, so it supports many audio, video and image formats, along with screen, webcam and audio capture. The application doesn't require importing files, thanks to its native timeline editing. Other features worth mentioning are multitrack timeline with thumbnails and waveforms, 4k resolution support, video effects, as well as a flexible UI with dockable panels.
  • Simple Screen Recorder Is Now Available as a Snap App
    Simple Screen Recorder, a popular screen recording app for Linux desktops, is now available to install as a Snap app from the Ubuntu Store.

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94