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About Tux Machines

Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Journal's Readers' Choice Awards 2011 srlinuxx 02/12/2011 - 7:05pm
Story openSUSE 12.1 KDE Live CD MarcusMoeller 02/12/2011 - 6:57pm
Story Lovefilm drops Flash, kills Linux support srlinuxx 1 02/12/2011 - 5:49pm
Story VLC Nightly Builds Bring Tweaked Look, New Features srlinuxx 02/12/2011 - 5:13pm
Story ASCII Games Rock srlinuxx 01/12/2011 - 11:12pm
Story Early Peek at Ubuntu Linux 12.04 srlinuxx 01/12/2011 - 11:08pm
Story Is Linux Mint an Ubuntu-Killer? srlinuxx 01/12/2011 - 11:06pm
Blog entry Miniatur Wunderland worlds largest model railway fieldyweb 01/12/2011 - 9:46pm
Story What Linux n00bs Need to Know srlinuxx 01/12/2011 - 9:10pm
Story Red Hat's Linux changes: Fixes or ISV positioning? srlinuxx 01/12/2011 - 9:09pm

KDE Commit-Digest for 29th April 2007

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In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Continued work across kdegames, with the kbattleship-rewrite merged back into trunk/. Start of scalable interface support in Kanagram. Further functionality enhancements implemented in the Konsole refactoring effort. Small refinements in KSysGuard.

Ubuntu versus Vista comparison

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There are those who believe, really believe in completely open source software, nothing proprietary and it’s a dream, it’s here but for most users it’s just a dream or not a concern at all. It’s Ubuntu versus Vista in everything from installing the operating system to configuring devices and installing drivers and which one comes out on top.

Review: PUD GNU/Linux 0.4.7

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PUD is a Chinese distro based on Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty) and the 2.6.20 kernel. They've patched in several filesystems and through using SquashFS for the loader filesystem, the ISO is a mere 193megs.

Platform and application security: Linux distributions, AppArmor and more

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Looking for the safest Linux distribution? Hardening Linux author and security expert James Turnbull ponders the field and difficulties in ranking distro's security in this Q&A . He also weighs in on security tool strength, as in AppArmor versus SELinux, and other platform and application security conundrums.

A quick and easy course in Webanese

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|-|3Y D00D0RZ!! \/\/31Come 7o mY bl4rg!!!111 That was leet-speak, an advanced form of Webanese. In this short article, you too can learn to speak it! We'll start with an example english sentence, and gradually translate it into Webanese. C'mon, D00d0Rz, 137's 5t4rt!!1

Beginner level:

Ubuntu replaces Suse, but not very well

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I finally pulled the trigger and replaced Suse 10.2 on europa with Ubuntu 7.04. How I got to this point was long and involved. The results of the change were less than I anticipated. If you're curious about the long strange trip it's been then read on.

In The Beginning

HOWTO create keyboard macros in Emacs

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You hear about the great macro feature of Emacs all the time. You see cheat sheets for Emacs key combinations all the time. But you never quite see the keyboard macro trick demonstrated clearly. Here's how it works:

The Perfect Desktop - Debian Etch (Debian 4.0)

With the release of Microsoft's new Windows operating system (Vista), more and more people are looking for alternatives to Windows for various reasons. In this tutorial I will show people who are willing to switch to Linux how they can set up a Linux desktop (Debian Etch in this article) that fully replaces their Windows desktop, i.e.

Red Hat Gets Into Mischief

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As Red Hat and its JBoss unit ramp up their SOA (service-oriented architectures) offerings and capabilities, they are re-emerging as a powerful mischief-maker to the established commercial vendors -- this time on the subject of data lifecycle in the age of SOA. But there soon could be much more mischief from Raleigh, N.C.

Is The OLPC Project Doomed?

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What began as an ambitious, but admirably noble dream of providing the world's underprivileged children an opportunity for the future is rapidly looking less like a charity and more like a sting operation as the project threatens to move from its present state of farce to a mechanism for exporting western corporate hegemony to the developing world.

Intensified Battle Lines

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Some years back Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) spokesperson Steven D'Aprano had posed a most intriguing question, "If Microsoft has a problem with piracy, it shouldn't be blamed on OEMs who sell PCs with Linux pre-installed or no operating system at all. Should we discourage supermarkets from selling plain bread, because shoppers might steal butter from elsewhere?"

Axel - lightweight command line download accelerator

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I never really fancied download accelerators but Axel is different - it’s a command line application and is naturally significantly more lightweight then those graphical download managers I’ve stopped using since 1996 (teh intraweb was slower then, and I was sucking bits of it through a state of the art 33.6kbps dial-up modem).

Ubuntu is not so bad

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So, I’ve been a big fan of Ubuntu ever since I started playing with Linux. Ubuntu isn’t just the best version of Linux I’ve used, its the best operating system I’ve used.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Debian Etch

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This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

8 reasons why Linux won’t make it to the desktop

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The Linux Proliferation Agreement is intended as a means to promote the use of Linux on the desktop and asks endusers to become structurally involved in making Linux visible in the public domain. Apart from the support there came a wide range of counterarguments of things that Linux would need to change before it would ever become a viable choice.

Browse and set wallpaper in Openbox with feh

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Pretty much since I started using Openbox, I’ve been wanting a simple way to change the wallpaper from the right-click menu. I eventually found a way, using a script that reads my wallpaper directory and lists files it finds there. Clicking on the menu entry triggers feh, which sets the image to the root window.

Windows and the OLPC XO

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I am quite startled by those who predict gloom and doom because Windows (embedded) will be able to run on a general purpose OPEN computer like the XO.

Is our goal a protectionist society where an elite group tells you what you can or can not use on your computer? Or, is our goal an open society where we win on merit and innovation?

Linux VS Windows: Fair, Balanced, and Comprehensive

Are you curious about Linux? Or perhaps just plain tired of Windows? I have composed a comprehensive list of the differences found between Microsoft Windows and Linux. While I've taken a humorous bent on several of the entries, each comparison is essentially true, particularly the bit about the Developers' cats. Tell me what you think!

Areas in which Linux beats Windows, hands down:

Making Debian sexy again: Sam Hocevar speaks

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How many developers run for the post of leader of the Debian GNU/Linux project and cite as part of their platform a desire to make Debian sexy again?

None that I know of - except Sam Hocevar who won the recent election for leader of the project. One among eight who put forward their cases to the 1043-odd developers who are eligible to vote, Hocevar modestly puts his election down to "luck."

Preparing for System Failure ... And Recovering Quickly

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Despite the improvements made each year by GNU/Linux, KDE, and GNOME, recovering from failure is one of the recurring themes many new users struggle with. Why aren't we making it easier to prepare for, and recover from, failure? Here are some proposals to make recovery less painful.

Change the Default Drive Partitioning

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Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.

More Security News (and FUD)

Leftovers: Software

  • Easy, Automated Benchmarking On Linux With PTS
    It's easy to run benchmarks on Linux as well as Solaris, BSD, and other operating systems, using our own Phoronix Test Suite open-source benchmarking software. For those that haven't had the opportunity to play with the Phoronix Test Suite for Linux benchmarking, it's really easy to get started. Aside from the official documentation, which is admittedly limited due to time/resource constraints, there are a few independent guides, Wiki pages, and other resources out there to get started.
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Alpha Tagged, New Features Inbound
    The first alpha release of the upcoming LibreOffice 5.3 open-source office suite was tagged a short time ago in Git. LibreOffice 5.3 is a major update to this distant fork of LibreOffice 5.3.0 is planned to be officially released in late January or early February while this week's alpha one is just the first step of the process. The hard feature freeze on 5.3 is at the end of November followed by a series of betas and release candidates. Those interested in more details on the release schedule can see this Wiki page.
  • MPV 0.21 Player Adds CUDA, Better Raspberry Pi Support
    MPV Player 0.21 is now available as the latest version of this popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2. MPV 0.21 adds support for CUDA and NVDEC (NVIDIA Decode) as an alternative to VDPAU. The NVIDIA decode support using CUDA was added to make up for VDPAU's current lack of HEVC Main 10 profile support. Those unfamiliar with NVDEC can see NVIDIA's documentation.
  • MPV 0.21.0 Media Player Adds Nvidia CUDA Support, Raspberry Pi Hardware Decoding
    Today, October 20, 2016, MPV developer Martin Herkt proudly announced the release of another maintenance update of the very popular MPV open-source and cross-platform media player software based on MPlayer. Looking at the release notes, which we've also attached at the end of the story for your reading pleasure, MPV 0.21.0 is a major update that adds a large amount of new features, options and commands, but also addresses dozens of bugs reported by users since the MPV 0.20.0 release, and introduces other minor enhancements. Among the most important new features, we can mention the ability to allow profile forward-references in the default profile, as well as support for Nvidia CUDA and cuvid/NvDecode, which appears to be a welcome addition to GNU/Linux distributions where HEVC Main 10 support is missing.
  • anytime 0.0.4: New features and fixes
    A brand-new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the three earlier releases since mid-September. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.