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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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What drives a mass Linux migration?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Nothing warms the cockles of a Linux lover's heart more than to hear that X or Y big company/city is migrating its desktops to the free operating system. And nothing can evoke more bitter insults than the reversal of any such decision.

Top 6 ultra-portable laptops

Filed under
Hardware

techradar.com: The laptop market has been absolutely turned on its head in the last 12 months. In the year that Alienware has unleashed its frighteningly quick Area-51 m15x gaming laptop, all anyone wants to talk about is the latest low-end Eee PC rival to have broken the £300 barrier. Here are six great ultra-portable notebooks available now.

Red Hat Summit Preview: Five Trends Worth Watching

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy will keep a close eye on the Red Hat Summit, which kicks off June 18 in Boston. Here are five trends and themes he’ll be investigating at the event.

Screenlets add customized functionality to the desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Screenlets.org, the site for their development and listing, describes screenlets as small Python applications, and the screenlet libraries as an effort "to simplify the creation of fully themeable mini-apps that each solve basic desktop-work-related needs and generally improve the usability and eye-candy" of the modern desktop.

Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinux.wordpress: I’m trying out a new distro on my new laptop and so far, pretty good. This is a Dell Vostro 1500 (1 G RAM Intel 2 core duo) which came preloaded with Windows XP. I’ve had my eye on Mandriva for awhile. One thing I like about Mandriva is the option of upgrading to the Power Pack version if I choose.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: New Installer, with Stephan Kulow

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: I’m glad to announce the beginning of the Sneak Peaks at openSUSE 11.0 series! Over the next few weeks we will be taking a look at all of the exciting changes and improvements in openSUSE 11.0, with each article being followed by an interview with a developer in the field.

Bulgaria: 'Government's increasing use of Open Source inevitable'

Filed under
OSS

metamorphosis.org.mk: The Bulgarian government will turn more and more to Open Source software, predicts Krasimir Panayotov, coordinator of the GNU/Linux User Group in the city of Rousse, the country's fifth-largest city.

A Microsoft coupon bonanza for Novell? Not really

Filed under
SUSE

Matt Asay: Ed Moltzen writes headlines an article with "Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers," which is true on its face, but not as interesting under the covers. Justin Steinman, Novell's head of Linux marketing, had told me a week ago

IBM releases ODF-based Office killer

Filed under
Software

linuxworld.com: IBM has officially launched the commercial version of its Lotus Symphony suite of productivity applications, and looks set amount a challenge to Microsoft Office in its enterprise heartland.

Alternative distros: DeLi Linux

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: I'm in search of a lightweight distro for an ancient 1ghz, 128MB RAM laptop. One of these days, I'll find a distro that properly supports ACPI and VGA-out. I hope. Now it's time for DeLi Linux.

Why must everything be newbie-friendly?

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I love Ubuntu as much as the next person, and I won’t ever say a bad thing about it. But occasionally I see one unusual side effect of the Ubuntu phenomenon — the sudden press to make everything “newbie-friendly.”

Firefox 3 RC2: still flawed

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet: The world seems enamored of Firefox 3. I’m not one of them. I would like to be if it wasn’t for the flaws I keep finding when using the Mac version.

Installing Songbird Media Player On Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to set up Songbird 0.5 on Ubuntu 8.04. Taken from the Songbird page: "Songbird is a desktop media player mashed-up with the Web.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Second Firefox 3 Release Candidate now available for download

  • Firefox 3 RC 2 review
  • Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors
  • Mozilla Firefox 3.0 Is the Best Browser For Web — For Now
  • A Review of Songbird
  • How long will it be before Linux is on your desktop?
  • Smaller Than a Laptop, but Bigger Than a Phone
  • OpenSUSE 11 Release Candidate 1 Review
  • Rotate Apache logs using Awstats
  • Announcing the openSUSE Marketing Team
  • Ubuntu Global Bug Jam
  • 90 things that are the same in Microsoft Office and OpenOffice.org
  • Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers
  • Advice for anyone who wants to put on a regional Linux show (video)
  • Taking note of Basket
  • Ubuntu is Slow
  • IT posters to cover your empty walls

GNOME 2.23.3 Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: For those not interested by today's KDE 4.0.5 release, perhaps you're interested in trying out the latest development version of GNOME. GNOME 2.23.3 has been released and what's special about this release is a great number of bug fixes.

A review of blender-containing live CD's

Filed under
Linux

pterandon.blogspot: Nineteen different live CD Linux distros were tested on a laptop. Knoppix 5.3.1, SLAMPP, and Wolvix make the cut in my first round of evaluation of the best live Linux CD for 3D graphics work. Artistix and Sabayon showed some problems but get an honorable mention for the sheer quantities of graphics software available.

One-Time Contributers

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: Tony Luck offered some statistics focused on the frequency of developers that only contribute to the Linux kernel one time, "I skimmed through looking for drive-by contributors (defined as someone who contributes to just one release and is then never heard from again)."

How Linux saved my life

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Have you ever been in a situation where you realised the frailty of your own existence? It happened to me. I sat thinking this is the end of the line but how little did I realise that I had a saviour alongside me in the form of the free open source operating system called Linux.

WSJ to Microsoft: You need to open source Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

Matt Asay: Many of us have been saying for a long time that Microsoft's Windows product would be better if the company open sourced it. But today marks the first day that the Wall Street Journal has chimed in to second the motion.

Pardus Linux 2007.3: Nobody's business but the Turks

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: I've actually ranted on Pardus before, but for some reason during an update I lost the actual rant. I don't remember if I ranted on this particular release or not, but here I go again either way.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: OpenMW and Linux Gaming Benchmark

  • OpenMW, the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing
    OpenMW [Official Site], the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing with recent blog posts highlighting some changes sounding rather great. Speaking on their official blog, the developers noted back in September that they've had some new developers come on board, with thanks in part to the multiplayer "TES3MP" project (Morrowind Multiplayer), which is built from OpenMW.
  • Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X For NVIDIA/Radeon Linux Gaming
    Following last week's look at using the new "Coffee Lake" Intel Core i3 / i5 / i7 CPUs for Linux gaming comparison among our other ongoing tests of these new "8th Gen" processors, a frequent request has been a closer look at the gaming performance between the Core i7 8700K and the Ryzen 7 1800X. Here's a look with two AMD Radeon graphics cards and two NVIDIA GeForce offerings.

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers