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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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KDevelop 4: A New Era

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: Like KDE4, KDevelop has seen much work on essential internal mechanisms (much like the pillars of KDE), the power of which will become evident over the next year or so. Progress has been great recently. In today's blog I'll concentrate on language support.

Linux 2.6.26

Filed under
Linux

lkml.org: So it's been almost three months since 2.6.25 (87 days to be exact, I think), making this a longer-than-usual release cycle. Or maybe it just feels that way, and we're always getting close to three months these days. But it's out there now.

Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

headshotgamer.com: These early snapshots are important to the Linux gaming community. The reason for this is simple; Gamers are hardware junkies. Newer kernels support newer hardware and the newer the distro, the newer the packages.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #99

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 99 for the weeks July 6th - July 12th, 2008 is now available. In this issue we cover: special 100th issue of the UWN next week, Intrepid Alpha 2 released, Ubuntu stats, new Kubuntu website, Ubuntu in US retailers, and much, much more!

email-reminder: Never forget a birthday or an anniversary again

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Email-Reminder is a simple tool to define events for which you want to receive a reminder by email. These reminders (sent out daily by a small cronjob) can be either on the day of the event and/or a few days beforehand.

Linux based virtualisation – the way to save money and go green

itwire.com: Virtualisation is a technology that can work wonders: provide a testing environment, enhance your processing power, consolidate your computing resources, decrease running costs, preserve legacy apps and more! Here’s how virtualisation can benefit you and why the Linux route really beats out the competition.

Linux not essential to Eee PC success: ASUS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

apcmag.com: Penguin-powered mini notebooks are selling like hotcakes. But will they finally bring Linux into the mainstream? Don’t count on it.

Mandriva Linux 2009.0 First Impressions

Filed under
MDV

lxer.com: This is sort of a first impressions report on both Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Alpha 2 and a bit of a report on what I've discovered about KDE 4 (4.1). I'm currently running Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Live CD on a Virtual Box virtual machine on my laptop.

More proof that the revolution is under way

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Tonight I met a systems engineer for a European car company who spent 20 minutes talking my ear off about the virtues of Linux, and how much it had changed — for the better — since his college days.

Learning The Linux Lingo

Filed under
Linux

makeuseof.com: We here at Make Use Of try to make your switch to Linux as smooth as possible, which includes using simple and common terminology. However there are plenty of terms that are unavoidable or at least impractical to avoid. So here they are.

My 10 Favourite Free/Open Source Applications

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Software

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: IT is easy, if you are a Microsoft Windows user, to get tied-in to certain applications. But what about Linux and Free/Open Source users? Your own must-have applications will obviously depend on what you use your computers for. My own everyday needs are quite modest.

Thinking about career in Linux? Part 1

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: The other night, a good question popped out of my head — How many of the geek teenagers wish to work on closed source technology today? It’s been pretty ubiquitous for the computer freaks to turn to Linux/OSS. However, before changing gears, it’s necessary to know what’s needed.

New Triangular Tessalations for Compiz

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Software

kdubois.net: In addition to the being able to break the window into hexagonal and rectangular shapes, using my triangular tessellation code found in the extra-animations plugin, Compiz can now break up the window into triangular shapes.

Exaile — versatile audio player for GNOME

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Software

polishlinux.org: Exaile is a wonderful application for listening to music in a GNOME environment, although it could be considered a newcomer to the music player world. I have been using Exaile for quite a while now and I think it is the best application of its kind.

Xfe Review - Wonderful File Manager

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Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: The first impression Xfe gave me was of a solid, full-featured, powerful and good-looking file manager. I have to admit, I was really impressed by this application, and I've never used it before. But Xfe is a completely new and pleasant experience. Let me tell you what I've found so nice about it...

10 Awesome Linux T-shirts

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Linux

linuxhaxor.net: I often find it necessary to express my inner geek side through my t-shirts. Be it in the form of my views about politics, computers, nature or just confusing tees that most people don’t know what they mean. So today I will share with you 10 of my favorite geeky linux inspired t-shirts that I own.

PCLinuxOS Magazine July 2008 Released

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, July 2008 (Issue 23) is available to download. Some highlights include: Linux Media Players - Part 1, How to change your localization, and Chapter 4 - Kde User Guide.

Opera 9.5 - Now leaner and meaner!

Filed under
Software

techtree.com: Slick, fast, feature-rich, excellent security, not only a browser but also email client, rss reader, IRC chat client, newsgroup reader and bittorrent downloader, Os compatibility with various OSes, Linux and Mac OS. Opera is more than just a browser. It's a one-stop-Internet-shop.

The Simply Simple Mandriva 2008.1 Spring

Filed under
MDV

linuxtreat.blogspot: Mandriva Linux 2008.1 Spring have up-to-date version of the major components such as KDE 3.5.9(KDE 4.0.3 also available), GNOME 2.22, Compiz Fusion 0.7.2, OpenOffice.org 2.4.0, Linux Kernal 2.6.24.4. Mandriva support vast varieties of hardware, it automatically detects and configure most of the hardware.

Also: Mandriva Pludge: Following the 2009 Release

The Perfect Server - CentOS 5.2

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.2 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 5.2, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Servers and Red Hat