Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 20 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story openSUSE 12.1 (GNOME) Review srlinuxx 30/11/2011 - 6:48pm
Story Sorting out Red Hat Linux based distributions srlinuxx 30/11/2011 - 6:46pm
Story Taking Screenshots with Shutter in Ubuntu Chris7mas 30/11/2011 - 2:13pm
Story Debian Sid+ gets KDE 4.7.2: install instructions lefty.crupps 30/11/2011 - 12:22pm
Story IM from the Terminal: 2 Great Applications Chris7mas 30/11/2011 - 10:29am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/11/2011 - 10:17am
Story Canonical questions Distrowatch share slide figures srlinuxx 30/11/2011 - 7:26am
Story Lubuntu 11.10 review: Lightweight Linux srlinuxx 30/11/2011 - 7:24am
Story Mageia 2 On Its Way srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:20pm
Story Mint solves Unity challenge srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:14pm

My Week in Linux: Video and Games

Filed under

One of my long standing issues with moving to Linux was trying to find a suitable video conversion application for my Cowon D2. It had to churn out suitable files and let me transfer them without booting into Windows. I tried, and failed, many times to find a solution to this problem, and was content to just boot Windows from time to time.

NVIDIA GeForce 8500GT 256MB

Filed under

The GeForce 8500GT is NVIDIA's value-priced contender in the GeForce 8 series. The 8500GT has a 450MHz core clock and 400MHz memory clock, but how is this $100 creation able to compete against other graphics cards from ATI and NVIDIA?

Staying on Top of Your Memory Usage in Linux

Filed under

Many people notice that after using a computer for a long period of time, that their system might start to slow down; programs open up or respond slower, web browsers seem sluggish, and the computer seems to all but slow to a crawl. Experienced users will recognize that this occurrence is due to limited free memory or RAM on the system.

New Linux Does Inclusive Virtualization

Filed under

The second Linux kernel release of 2007 is now available, further extending the virtualization and real-time capabilities of Linux.

Highlighting the Linux 2.6.21 update is the inclusion of the paravirt-ops paravirtualization interface, which enables multiple hypervisors to hook directly into Linux.

Debain WrEtch: review of an UnAmerican Linux system

Filed under

Debain is the only group of software developers who still believe that Richard Stallman invented programming. Everyone else now correctly credits Bill Gates for doing so. Debain developers hold themselves separate from the rest of the Linux community because of their pride in not stealing from other operating systems to build their version of Linux.

Microsoft To Release Silverlight To Open Source Community

Filed under

Microsoft Corporation may release part of the source code of its Silverlight technology to the open source community.

Compiz On Solaris X86 - Eye Candy For Solaris’s Desktop

Filed under

Want to have all that eye candy (desktop coolness) that we have on Linux on your Solaris box. It is still little rough on edges, but it is coming there slowly. Guess soon Solrais will have as stable packages available as there are for Linux distributions. Calc function tools

Filed under

Once you are comfortable with inputting functions and formulas, the next step is to learn how to automate the processes. Calc includes over half a dozen tools to help you manipulate functions and formulas, ranging from features for copying and reusing data to creating subtotals automatically to ones for varying information to help you find the answers that you need.

Spreading opportunity

Filed under

Growing up in Keizer, Justin Gallardo and Michael Burns learned about computers by taking them apart to see how they worked and by doing triage when their machines crashed.

Now the 20-year-old computer science majors at Oregon State University are working to ensure that children in developing countries have that same opportunity.

Your Momma Uses Linux

Filed under

Those of us who grew up in the seventies probably remember variations of this pejorative phrase. often aimed at either the schoolyard bully, or perhaps your best friend in jest. There was often no additional descriptor: just the first two words hanging there. The implication that your mother was... something left undescribed...

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 Available for Testing

Filed under

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is now available for testing. New features in this development milestone of Mozilla Firefox 3 include the FUEL JavaScript library for extension developers, a redesigned Page Info window, improvements to offline application support and Gecko 1.9 bug fixes.

“I don’t know what Linux is but I don’t like it”

Filed under

In college, almost everyone has a personal computer. More and more people are using Macs - it seems that 10% of the class of 2007 uses Macs, whereas it appears that roughly half of freshman (class of 2010) are using Macs. I’ve used PCs, Macs, and lately a lot of Linux. I’ve even written my own operating system.

Free, Open, Eating Its Young

Filed under

The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) world is cram-full of interesting, smart, fun people. It's also full of trolls, jerks, and abusive wastes of time, and very confused when it comes to civility. A lot of FOSSers fall into the Five Geek Social Fallacies trap, especially the first two:

Geek Social Fallacy #1: Ostracizers Are Evil

XO laptop is fun for child's play

Filed under

The hardest thing about learning to use the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project's XO notebook PC is finding the right way to twist its antenna ears and open the display. Once you can see the screen, just follow the icons to write a note, snap a photo, or compose a tune.

Linux: Releasing With Known Regressions

Filed under

Following the release announcement of the 2.6.21 Linux kernel, Adrian Bunk noted that he no longer planned to track regressions. He explained, "if we would take 'no regressions' seriously, it might take 4 or 5 months between releases due to the lack of developer manpower for handling regressions.

The real tune on real time Linux

Filed under

Generally, I’m a fan of taking the high road. I’d much rather talk about what we do than talk about what the competition is doing. But sometimes you can’t let things slide…

Shiny Dolphin Mockups

Filed under

Nookie provided some Dolphin Mockups to show how he imagines Dolphin. While some of the enhancements do look a bit like a file manager of a certain wide spread operating system they do look good.

Nookie is a kbfx developer. I’m not sure why he produces Dolphin Mockups, but they look very slick and shiny anyway.

VDrift: Three confessions, an exaltation and a warning

Filed under

I don’t play racing games. I’ve been driving for decades, and so it’s not really that appealing. I mean, if I wanted to race a car, I’d just make the arrangements and do the real thing. A racing game just isn’t far enough detached from reality to amuse my sense of imagination. And I’m not a gearhead at all, so it’s only an oblique interest to start with.

Love and hate with Kommander

Filed under

Kommander is, IMHO, a great idea which needs a lot of technical improvements. The core idea is very good, but Kommander has many problems and bugs that need to be solved if it wants to be much more useful. I am currently using Kommander for a couple of things and fully acknowledge its power. There’s also a Kommander scripts section at

Ubuntu lays down the trademark law

Filed under

Trademarks have recently become something of an issue in open-source circles. Debian, for example, recently took exception to Mozilla's Firefox trademark rules and called its version of the popular browser, IceWeasel. So, Ubuntu has decided to address possible trademark issues by creating its own trademark policy.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow