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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New UN-backed open-source tool will support community resilience-building Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 8:43am
Story How Google Employs Open Source Solutions For Cross-Platform App Development Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 8:39am
Story ClearOS Community 6.6.0 Beta 2 Released Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 7:20am
Story Kernel 3.18 development – the kernel column Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 10:45pm
Story Qt 5.4 Release Candidate Available Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 10:38pm
Story Weston's IVI Shell Sees New Version Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 10:30pm
Story Python 3 Support Added To The GNOME Shell Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 10:17pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.3.1-15 Now Available with Check for 32-bit Libraries Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 9:59pm
Story Workaround Found for Annoying Workspace Switcher Bug in Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 9:51pm
Story Inside Cisco's OpenStack Cloud Strategy Rianne Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 9:48pm

Does Linux Need a $300 Million Ad Campaign?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Microsoft is now spending $300 million to counter Apple's "I'm a Mac" ads. Does Linux need its own ad campaign?

MEPIS jumps on 2.6.27

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: Only ten days after the release of Linux 2.6.27, the SimplyMEPIS project has decided to work the new kernel into its next release. The project today used the kernel in both 32- and 64-bit versions of the third beta release of SimplyMEPIS 8.

Introducing Open Source to the World - Part 2

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: In part 1 I covered some great examples of things I've learned while trying to share Open Source with those around me in school. In this part I'll be going over some of the things I've learned about evangelizing Linux to others around me.

Silly Linux users..

Filed under
Linux

jerkin.us: I read alot of Linux related news and articles. Why is it people find it so hard when trying to convince people to switch over to Linux that the chances of them being programmers is almost zero? Here’s a little stat, of the Windows users I know who ask frequently about switching to Linux, none of them even remotely care about programming.

An Introduction to Tiling Window Managers

Filed under
Software

tuxtraining.com: In computing, a tiling window manager is a window manager with an organization of the screen into mutually non-overlapping frames, as opposed to the more popular approach of coordinate-based stacking of overlapping objects (windows) that tries to fully emulate the desktop metaphor.

odds & ends

Filed under
News

Is the Linux community afraid of Opensolaris?

Filed under
OS

c0t0d0s0.eu: In the last few weeks i´ve heard one sentence quite often: "Why you you still develop Solaris? You should contribute to Linux!" from people administering Linux systems. And you could read at other places, that Solaris is irrelevant, that there is nothing worth of mentioning it or even for an integration to Linux. Just think about the Zemlin quotations!

Call it a 'sub-subnotebook.' New 'PC' is small as a cell phone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: IMOVIO launched today a smaller alternative to a subnotebook -- much smaller. The new iKIT is about the size of a PDA from ten years ago, but has a QWERTY keyboard and connects to the Internet at 3G speeds via your cell phone or Wi-Fi.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 275

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Linux package management cheatsheet, part 4

  • News: Upgrading Mandriva with mdkonline, Blu-ray sets for Debian "Lenny", Linux Mint 5 for 64-bit systems, interview with KPackageKit developers, K12Linux update
  • Released last week: NetBSD 4.0.1, Parted Magic 3.1
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3, Ubuntu 8.10 RC
  • New additions: BSDanywhere
  • New distributions: Bardinux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.28 - Part 2: network infrastructure and network drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The commit flood for 2.6.28 during the current merge window doesn't look like ending soon – in the last 24 hours alone, Linus Torvalds has integrated a further 700 patches, most of them contributed by other kernel developers, into Linux's main development tree.

Ubuntu vs. XP From A Blogger’s Perspective

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcmech.com: I have an older Dell Inspiron 6000 that I recently decided to go true-blue dual boot with Ubuntu v8.04 and Windows XP Professional SP3. The first thing I found myself dealing with is that I can’t use Windows Live Writer in Ubuntu.

Lessons Linux Should Learn From Windows and Mac

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Sometimes we can be pretty quick to dismiss the competition and really try to aggressively push the Linux ’cause’, if you get what I mean. We can see that Windows and Mac do a great number of things right, and not all of them are things that Linux gets perfect.

Mac, Linux, BSD open for attack: Kaspersky

Filed under
Security

computerworld.com.au: Looming attacks will soon pop the security bubble enjoyed by Linux and Macintosh users, according to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky.

OpenOffice 3 - Nice!

Filed under
OOo

dedoimedo.com: I have been using OpenOffice extensively for at least the last 3 years and seen many versions come out. In daily routine, people usually pay little attention to what new features their software updates bring, but when you look back and bunch years of continuous progress into a single, coherent thought, you get an impression.

Also: Openoffice 3.0 vs MS Office

Want to Laugh? Another Tall Tale About Where Linux Came From

Filed under
Linux

groklaw.net: This is so funny. Yet another "history" of Linux. To be fair, those Wall Street dudes are likely under a lot of stress nowadays. If he needs a job, maybe he should write a column with "Paul Murphy", who also comes up with his own histories on the birth of Linux.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Linux Action Show Mini Episode 1

  • Novell Joins Moblin to Further Development of Linux-based Mobile Devices
  • Backup and Restore Package Lists in Ubuntu
  • Middle East lagging open source
  • Working with CSV files in Bash
  • Intrepid Ibex: Upgrade to Ubuntu 8.10 in 5 simple steps
  • Which is more relevant - iPhone or Linux?
  • Mozilla Messaging releases new Thunderbird 3 alpha
  • Andrew Lahdelt Timed the Market, but Missed the Mark on Linux
  • Problem Running Bash Script In Cron

Q&A: Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

zdnet.com.au: In this candid interview with ZDNet.com.au, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst discusses why he thinks rival VMWare will fail, how the financial crisis will be good for open source, and why cloud computing will be the future.

Top 12 Most Absurd Quotes By Steve Ballmer

Filed under
Microsoft

junauza.com: Yesterday, my post was about the latest stupid remarks by Steve Ballmer at the Gartner Symposium ITxpo. Today, we'll take a look at his all time most ridiculous quotes.

The Calm Before the Open Source Storm

Filed under
OSS

mr-oss.com: Companies who have previously relied upon software to generate revenue will see financial decline if they take the open source road. This decline however is to be short lived and in the long run will prove to be a power play that will pay off in the future and here is why.

KDE 4 Is The New KDE 3 (Are /You/ Ready?)

Filed under
KDE

lincoln.ac.uk/~padams: So, the eagle-eyed of you may have noticed something happen to my T61 as I was taking screenshots of the LTSP setup for LEL.... That's right! I have finally switched from my beloved KDE 3.5 to KDE 4.1. And I'm very happy about it indeed.

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More in Tux Machines

NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

I'm very please to propose you the first release candidate version of the next version 10.1 stable version of NuTyX As they have been so many security issues, I took the chance to recompile all the collections (1701 packages) for this coming next stable NuTyX version. Read more

Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.