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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Upstart in Debian srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:18am
Story Fedora Linux 18 beta finally released srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:12am
Story 7 Open Source Questions With Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:10am
Story Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon Review srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:45pm
Story GNOME 3.7.2 Drops Fallback Mode srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:43pm
Story KDE 4.10 Brings Better, Smarter Dolphin srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:40pm
Story The Cost of Ubuntu srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:03pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 3:21pm
Story There's a New Package Manager in Town srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 4:13am
Story 15 Weird/Surprising Devices And Systems That Run On Linux srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 12:22am

Linspire Saga Slideshow

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: Lindows/Linspire, the controversial Linux company, and its even more controversial founder Michael Roberston have been making waves in technology since their arrival.

View Here

Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Wolvix is a Linux distribution released as an installable liveCD. Originally based on Slax, it is now built upon Slackware and seems to concentrate highly on multimedia. It features XFCE4 and Fluxbox and comes with a large suite of software. Version 1.1.0 was released a few days ago and I decided to give it a little spin this weekend.

Lenovo or No, Linux Not There Yet

Filed under
Linux

Red Herring: With Monday’s news that it will bundle Linux on laptops, Lenovo becomes the second major PC maker to offer the open-source operating system on consumer PCs. But though the move is a boost for the OS, analysts say it’ll be years before desktop Linux can seriously threaten proprietary systems like Windows.

First test version of klik2 available

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: A first test version of klik2 is available. The new version features among other things fuse support.

Dancing with Wolves, a Wolvix Hunter 1.1.0 Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

on-disk.com: When Kenneth (aka Wolven) submitted Wolvix Hunter and Cub 1.1.0 to us here at On-Disk.com it was nice to see he had a new release, but I had not expected more than some updates to the existing model. Then, as I did the normal double checking that is done when we prepare to post a new release, I found that this was a serious jump from previous releases based on Slax.

Granny Uses PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

In this newest "letter" from Granny, she shares how easy installing and using Linux really can be. She also has many grateful words to share with the team at KDE and PCLinuxOS... Complete article

Free Software Magazine Issue 19

Filed under
OSS

Issue 19 of Free Software Magazine is out, and so are another 18 fantastic articles. Tony Mobily opens the magazine with his editorial on file formats. Andrew Min and Gary Richmond join forces to provide useful tips&tricks, while Robin Monks reviews some of the best free software media players.

Compositing Goodness

Filed under
SUSE

Far from Perfect: As some of you know, I gave up on MS Windows a long time ago. I have a small partition with Vista on it, but I run openSuse Linux more than 90% of the time. I have also moved into the realm of Composited Desktops. I had been running Beryl, but it merged back into Compiz earlier into the year and became Compiz Fusion. A few nights ago openSuse finally released some packages of Compiz Fusion as Compiz 0.5.2 was released.

Set up user accounts quickly and securely

Filed under
HowTos

Vincent Danen: When you need to set up a user account to give a user shell access to the system, the only logical choice of login tool is OpenSSH. With SSH keys, all you need from the user is his SSH public key, and all he needs from you is the IP address or hostname with which to log in. Usually, this is sufficient. In some cases, the user may need to know what his own password is.

Review: Linux Mint 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: Linux Mint, a derivative of Ubuntu which ultimately is a derivative of Debian, is a distribution that seeks to take what Ubuntu did wrong, and do it right. Their goal is to provide the most complete, out of the box experience a user can have in a linux distribution. Is it all talk and no mint, or is it really a distribution you can sink your teeth into? Well, let’s dive in and find out.

KDE Commit-Digest for 5th August 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Work in Plasma, with extra sources for the Weather data engine, work on the applet browser, and the start of SystemTray and RSIBreak plasmoids and a "next generation" application launcher, named Lancelot. Cut-down versions of Korundum and Smoke libraries for writing scripted Plasma applets. More interface work for Amarok 2.

PCFluxboxOS - Progress Report

Filed under
PCLOS

mypclinuxos.com: For anybody that doesn’t know, PCFluxboxOS is a remaster spin-off series of PCLinuxOS using the Fluxbox window manager to deliver a light and fast desktop experience.

Fedora 7 does Creative Commons

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: REDHAT-SPONSORED open source project Fedora 7 will be the platform for the Creative Commons LiveContent CD, which showcases open source software.

HP Offers Open-Source Code

Filed under
OSS

pcworld: Hewlett-Packard is releasing to the open source community the computer code for a software programming interface that helps manage large data sets in high performance computing environments.

Lenovo to sell laptops with SUSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Reuters: Lenovo Group Ltd., the world's No. 3 PC maker, said on Monday it would start selling laptop computers preloaded with Linux software from Novell Inc. instead of Microsoft Corp.'s Windows operating system.

Shuttleworth: Microsoft Fracturing the Open-Source Community

Filed under
Microsoft

eWeek: Microsoft has succeeded in fracturing the Linux and open-source community with the patent indemnity agreements it has entered into with several prominent vendors, Ubuntu leader and Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth told eWEEK.

The first KDE 4.0 beta hits the streets

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica: KDE 4.0 is very exciting, though not yet production ready, and that shows with this weeks' release of the first beta. It's a beta release for a major software project and thus, it comes complete with bugs, crashes, missing artwork, and other goodies one would expect such as new code, new technologies and fun toys.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 214

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: GParted LiveCD vs Parted Magic

  • Statistics: DistroWatch in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • News: MEPIS returns to Debian roots, Ubuntu dismisses Automatix, Carmony leaves Linspire, Medison Celebrity offers low-cost notebook with Fedora, Murdock explains future of Solaris
  • Released last week: Arch Linux 2007.08, Puppy Linux 2.17.1
  • Upcoming releases: Asianux 3.0, Foresight Linux 2.0
  • Donations: FreeNAS receives US$350
  • New additions: Webconverger
  • New distributions: CPX mini, FreevoLive, JUXlala, Klikit-Linux, OSWA-Assistant
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?
    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting. The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.
  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility
    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features. PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.
  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference
    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things. Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.
  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China
    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week. After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George. What did he learn? Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu. Read more

Open-source voting is the answer to hacking concerns

Will we ever have a voting system that is completely error-proof and impenetrable from malicious forces? Not likely. But the security breaches that are increasingly a part of daily life serve as a call to action. Every day brings a new report of hacking or suspicious activity, and increasingly with fingers pointing to international actors. Whether it is statewide voter registration databases (Illinois and Arizona; some say more); national party organizations (the Democratic National Committee); utilities (Vermont’s Burlington Electric); or Russia’s state-run television station (RT) suddenly interrupting C-SPAN last week — the incident is still under investigation and not confirmed as a hack — it is all very unsettling and leaves us feeling vulnerable. Read more

The Many, the Humble, the Ubuntu Users

I have never been much of a leading-edge computing person. In fact, I first got mildly famous online writing a weekly column titled “This Old PC” for Time/Life about making do with used gear — often by installing Linux on it — and after that an essentially identical column for Andover.net titled “Cheap Computing,” which was also about saving money in a world where most online computing columns seemed to be about getting you to spend until you had no money left to spend on food. Read more