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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Kernel Log: Stable series development is speeding up, X Server 1.6 available soon

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The development speed of the Linux stable series and the number of integrated changes, has been rising in the past few weeks. In February alone, the maintainers of the stable kernel series have released four new versions 2.6.28.x and five new 2.6.27.x kernels,

Linux Monday: Directory for Beginners

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Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: One of the things that throws people when they're first looking at Linux is that they can't find their C:\ drive. Linux looks at files a little differently than Windows, but it's not too complicated and you shouldn't have to look too deep to find stuff.

How you can help Windows users quit

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: What’s wrong with using Windows? As with other addictions, informed recreational use has few drawbacks, but continual dependence on particular software is a different matter.

MIPS Technologies Joins the Linux FoundationSunday, February 22nd, 2009

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that MIPS Technologies has become a member of the Foundation. By joining the Linux Foundation, MIPS Technologies will help drive growth and promotion of Linux among its customer base and beyond.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Post 4.2 features - part 2 [Lancelot]

  • CoyoteLinux uses Mono for syadmin tools
  • Desktop-Switcher Released for Intrepid
  • Using ALSA with multiple sound cards (on gentoo)
  • Mandriva Linux KDE Desktop a cut above
  • Secrets of an Adware Author
  • Copycat Linux?
  • Should Filesystems Be Optimized for SSD’s?
  • Ghost Bugs
  • The Podcast 1 - Under the Patio
  • Linux Outlaws 78 - GNUgle

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HOWTO : VirtualBox 2.1.4 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Update Gimp in Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 - The Fast Way
  • Non-Ubuntu Installation of conkyForecast
  • Power Tools: Piles of Files
  • Using DNSSEC Today
  • Email Notification of Available Updates: Ubuntu/Debian Server
  • How To Password Protect GRUB Entries (Linux)

Why an ASUS Android Netbook?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: An Indian Web site has confirmed ASUS is developing a version of its Eee PC Netbook to run Google’s Android software. Personally I think the better story is what ASUS has against Ubuntu, but that’s just me.

Ubuntu 9.10: Better, Or Just Better-Looking?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Mark Shuttleworth recently outlined development goals for the latest and greatest version of Ubuntu, the “Karmic Koala,” set to be released in October 2009. The innovations planned for the desktop, which is set for a major aesthetic makeover, look nice enough. But is this the time to be placing looks before functionality?

81st Annual Academy Awards Winners

Filed under
Movies

The 81st Annual Academy Awards was broadcast this evening and the winners are in. The actresses were dressed beautifully and all the men looked like penguins. I saw many of the movies nominated this year and it was hard to pick my favorites.

Debian Lenny Based SimplyMEPIS 8.0 is Released

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Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS LLC has released SimplyMEPIS 8.0, the community edition of MEPIS 8.0. SimplyMEPIS 8.0 utilizes a Debian Lenny stable foundation enhanced with a Long Term Support kernel, key package upgrades, and the MEPIS Assistant applications.

Linux: It’s A Marketing Problem

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Linux

linuxloop.com: The big question everyone asks when it comes to Linux is “why doesn’t everyone use it?” The answer is marketing.

Why Microsoft should fear Ubuntu's Cloud efforts

Filed under
OS

news.cnet.com: As we try to figure out the future of the Cloud, one thing is assured: developers will drive both deployment and consumption approaches. As is common to so many other major software shifts, developers lead, regardless of what vendors want the market to look like.

Red Hat learns the white paper game

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the most time-honored traditions of technology marketing is the white paper. Red Hat is learning how to play this game, but at a cost and in a manner open source can live with.

Variations on an Open Source Theme

Filed under
Software

opendotdotdot.blogspot: One of the most extraordinary - and under-recognised - developments in free software is the blossoming of specialist software applications.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #130

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #130 for the week of February 15th- February 21st, 2009 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 9.10 - Karmic Koala, Jaunty feature freeze, Kubuntu 8.04.2 released, and more.

VectorLinux Standard Edition 6.0 Released

Filed under
Linux

vectorlinux.com: The final release of VectorLinux 6.0 (code name 'Voyager') is now available. This release is a major milestone in the ten year history of Vectorlinux.

Weekly Distro Roundup for Feb 15-21

Another week has passed and it’s time again for the weekly Distro Roundup. This week's updates includes ArtistX 0.6, sidux 2009-01, Arch Linux 2009.02 and much more. Check out the full article at LinuxNinja.com.

Five Best Live CDs

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OS
Linux

lifehacker.com.au: Live CDs (and DVDs) are versatile tools, allowing you to boot into an operating system without installing anything to your hard drives. Let's take a closer look at the five most popular live CDs.

A Prey Update For Linux, But Still No UT3

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Prey is a game that was released a while ago for the Windows platform, but it wasn't until last December that the Linux client was finally released. An update is now available for Prey.

Linux forensics - Introduction

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Most of the time, we do not really care about our computers. They are a means to an end, or many ends. Games, Internet, work, you name it. When everything works, the PC is a somewhat noisy beast that let us do what we want - most of the time. But what happens when something goes wrong?

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more