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Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

The polls are closed, the data has been audited and the results are in. Here are the official results for the 2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards:

Distribution of the Year -

Ascii Art Video and Images

Filed under
HowTos

You can easily watch videos and view images in ascii. If you are ascii art fans, you will be amazed what libaa and libcaca capable of. libaa is a portable ascii art GFX library, where libcaca as well, is another ascii art library but it have better support such as unicode, 2048 colors etc.

Fedora and Ubuntu to incorporate Kernel-based virtualization

Filed under
Linux

The latest release of the Linux kernel, 2.6.20, includes integrated virtualization capabilities with the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). The KVM kernel module leverages x86 virtualization extensions included in various Intel and AMD processors. Several distributions, including Ubuntu and Fedora, are already preparing to include the KVM kernel module in upcoming releases.

Reuters news organization banned from reporting!

Filed under
Linux

The headline of this post is tongue-in-cheek (but of course you knew that already, right?). Reuters, to the best of my knowledge, has not been banned from reporting. Although based on some of their recent work, they should be.

New Microsoft deal in the works with Red Hat? Don’t bet on it

Filed under
Linux

There's a story making the rounds today that Microsoft is poised to sign a new technology partnership with Red Hat that could be as sweeping as the one it signed with Novell. There's only one problem with the report: Red Hat is denying it.

10 Linux commands you've never used

Filed under
HowTos

It takes years maybe decades to master the commands available to you at the Linux shell prompt. Here are 10 that you will have never heard of or used. They are in no particular order. My favorite is mkfifo.

Make Sure Your Machine Is On The Correct Time With ntpdate

Filed under
HowTos

I have been doing a lot of ssh connections between my machines lately and noticed that the times were different between each. I had assumed that each would be fairly close but one was even five minutes off. Well, that was an easy fix using ntpdate.

Grab Windows Internet Radio Streams in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ah, sadly, you can’t use streamripper. Sad Most radios use Windows streams, so we’ll have to use Mplayer to record it.

LinuxWorld New York: a longer name for a smaller show (videos)

Filed under
Linux

IDG's East Coast Linux gathering is now officially called the LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit (LWOSS). The inaugural 2007 version of the renamed conference was held February 14 and 15 in the conference area of the Marriott Marquis hotel in Manhattan, not in a huge convention center.

Techniques for memory debugging

Filed under
News

Exercise good memory-related coding practices by creating a comprehensive program to keep memory errors under control.

Bandwidth Monitoring Tools for Linux Users

Filed under
Software

Bandwidth in computer networking refers to the data rate supported by a network connection or interface. One most commonly expresses bandwidth in terms of bits per second (bps). Bandwidth represents the capacity of the connection. Here is the list of bandwidth monitoring tools for your network bandwidth.

LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Wrap Up--Is Open Source Really Superior?

Filed under
Linux

Without a doubt, the topic wasn't on the official list of conference tracks at LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit 2007. But among IT managers and developers who braved icy winds and snow to trek to the two-day show in New York City, talk was in the air over whether software emerging from the open source tradition is really any better than other software.

IT Job Titles Gone Wild

Filed under
Humor

I was in a meeting at my company where we did the usual introductory hand shake followed by a frenzied tossing of business cards on to the table for exchange. For once in our lives we could forgo all of those self-aggrandizing titles and meet people with cards that say it like we know it already.

Gnome vs KDE

Filed under
Software

It appears this old argument is flaring up again. Christian Schaller suggested Linus Torvalds should try using Gnome for a month and then report back on his experiences. Inspired by this I've decided to take up the challenge – all be it in the opposite direction.

Setting up a serial console

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial will show you how to set up a serial console on a Linux system, and connect to it via a null modem cable. This is quite useful if your Linux server is in a headless configuration (no keyboard or monitor), as it allows you to easily get a console on the system if there are any problems with it (especially network problems, when SSH is not available). In the end, the GRUB menu will appear over the serial link, as will the bootup messages (output when booting the system). I am using Debian Etch on the server and Ubuntu Edgy on my client, although this should work on any Linux distribution.

openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1

Filed under
SUSE

Last week I released openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1 and installed it on my laptop as well. There are not many user visible changes in the system, in most cases it looks like 10.2. But under the hood a number of changes have been done that will everybody:

Google should make a Linux

Filed under
Google

FOR THE CONSUMER desktop/laptop market, Linux has been a non-starter. Sure, you can find many many different flavours of Linux available online, but you can't go to the local Big Box store and get a PC loaded with Linux on it.

CLI Magic: Linux troubleshooting tools 101

Filed under
HowTos

When something goes wrong with your Linux-based system, you can try to diagnose it yourself with the many troubleshooting tools bundled with the operating system. Knowing about these tools, and how to effectively use them, can help you overcome many of the common problems on your system. Here's a list of some of the weapons in your arsenal against Linux problems.

MPAA nicked my software

Filed under
Misc

The writer of the blogging engine called Forest Blog spotted the pirate hunting outfit MPAA was using his work and had completely violated his linkware licence.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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