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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Mandriva One 2009 fails to impress

Filed under
MDV

bitburners.com: Or does it just simply fail? I have always rated Mandriva’s releases highly, and the past year has been especially good for them as the 2008 and 2008.1 have been awesome releases. Therefore the expectations were high when I was loading the Mandriva One 2009 edition to my IBM Thinkpad.

9 Must-Have OpenOffice Extensions

Filed under
OOo

makeuseof.com: Like Firefox, OpenOffice also comes with extensions that you can use to improve its functionality. Here, we have tested all the extensions and sorted out those that are useful for everyday use. Some of them are for general use while some are only meant for Writer, Calc or Impress.

Switching from Windows to Linux, what you need to know

Filed under
Linux

benkevan.com: Since we are in touch economic times the most important question is “How much will this cost me”? The answer is nothing, zero, zilch or nada. I would go on the edge and say it may actually save you money. How?

Does Linux Need a $300 Million Ad Campaign?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Microsoft is now spending $300 million to counter Apple's "I'm a Mac" ads. Does Linux need its own ad campaign?

MEPIS jumps on 2.6.27

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: Only ten days after the release of Linux 2.6.27, the SimplyMEPIS project has decided to work the new kernel into its next release. The project today used the kernel in both 32- and 64-bit versions of the third beta release of SimplyMEPIS 8.

Introducing Open Source to the World - Part 2

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: In part 1 I covered some great examples of things I've learned while trying to share Open Source with those around me in school. In this part I'll be going over some of the things I've learned about evangelizing Linux to others around me.

Silly Linux users..

Filed under
Linux

jerkin.us: I read alot of Linux related news and articles. Why is it people find it so hard when trying to convince people to switch over to Linux that the chances of them being programmers is almost zero? Here’s a little stat, of the Windows users I know who ask frequently about switching to Linux, none of them even remotely care about programming.

An Introduction to Tiling Window Managers

Filed under
Software

tuxtraining.com: In computing, a tiling window manager is a window manager with an organization of the screen into mutually non-overlapping frames, as opposed to the more popular approach of coordinate-based stacking of overlapping objects (windows) that tries to fully emulate the desktop metaphor.

odds & ends

Filed under
News

Is the Linux community afraid of Opensolaris?

Filed under
OS

c0t0d0s0.eu: In the last few weeks i´ve heard one sentence quite often: "Why you you still develop Solaris? You should contribute to Linux!" from people administering Linux systems. And you could read at other places, that Solaris is irrelevant, that there is nothing worth of mentioning it or even for an integration to Linux. Just think about the Zemlin quotations!

Call it a 'sub-subnotebook.' New 'PC' is small as a cell phone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: IMOVIO launched today a smaller alternative to a subnotebook -- much smaller. The new iKIT is about the size of a PDA from ten years ago, but has a QWERTY keyboard and connects to the Internet at 3G speeds via your cell phone or Wi-Fi.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 275

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Linux package management cheatsheet, part 4

  • News: Upgrading Mandriva with mdkonline, Blu-ray sets for Debian "Lenny", Linux Mint 5 for 64-bit systems, interview with KPackageKit developers, K12Linux update
  • Released last week: NetBSD 4.0.1, Parted Magic 3.1
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3, Ubuntu 8.10 RC
  • New additions: BSDanywhere
  • New distributions: Bardinux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.28 - Part 2: network infrastructure and network drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The commit flood for 2.6.28 during the current merge window doesn't look like ending soon – in the last 24 hours alone, Linus Torvalds has integrated a further 700 patches, most of them contributed by other kernel developers, into Linux's main development tree.

Ubuntu vs. XP From A Blogger’s Perspective

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcmech.com: I have an older Dell Inspiron 6000 that I recently decided to go true-blue dual boot with Ubuntu v8.04 and Windows XP Professional SP3. The first thing I found myself dealing with is that I can’t use Windows Live Writer in Ubuntu.

Lessons Linux Should Learn From Windows and Mac

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Sometimes we can be pretty quick to dismiss the competition and really try to aggressively push the Linux ’cause’, if you get what I mean. We can see that Windows and Mac do a great number of things right, and not all of them are things that Linux gets perfect.

Mac, Linux, BSD open for attack: Kaspersky

Filed under
Security

computerworld.com.au: Looming attacks will soon pop the security bubble enjoyed by Linux and Macintosh users, according to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky.

OpenOffice 3 - Nice!

Filed under
OOo

dedoimedo.com: I have been using OpenOffice extensively for at least the last 3 years and seen many versions come out. In daily routine, people usually pay little attention to what new features their software updates bring, but when you look back and bunch years of continuous progress into a single, coherent thought, you get an impression.

Also: Openoffice 3.0 vs MS Office

Want to Laugh? Another Tall Tale About Where Linux Came From

Filed under
Linux

groklaw.net: This is so funny. Yet another "history" of Linux. To be fair, those Wall Street dudes are likely under a lot of stress nowadays. If he needs a job, maybe he should write a column with "Paul Murphy", who also comes up with his own histories on the birth of Linux.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Linux Action Show Mini Episode 1

  • Novell Joins Moblin to Further Development of Linux-based Mobile Devices
  • Backup and Restore Package Lists in Ubuntu
  • Middle East lagging open source
  • Working with CSV files in Bash
  • Intrepid Ibex: Upgrade to Ubuntu 8.10 in 5 simple steps
  • Which is more relevant - iPhone or Linux?
  • Mozilla Messaging releases new Thunderbird 3 alpha
  • Andrew Lahdelt Timed the Market, but Missed the Mark on Linux
  • Problem Running Bash Script In Cron

Q&A: Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

zdnet.com.au: In this candid interview with ZDNet.com.au, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst discusses why he thinks rival VMWare will fail, how the financial crisis will be good for open source, and why cloud computing will be the future.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.