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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Distro testing marathon - Fedora 15 srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 4:09am
Story Control Points and Steering Mechanisms srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 4:06am
Story OpenOffice.org and Symphony srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 2:10am
Story Firefox at 64-bit: Do You Care? srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 2:08am
Story 7 days in the cloud: My week with the Samsung Chromebook srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 2:05am
Story Flash Drive Linux vs. Standard Linux Desktops srlinuxx 19/07/2011 - 2:03am
Story Infamous Microsoft FUD Campaigns Against Linux srlinuxx 2 19/07/2011 - 1:10am
Story Leaky Unity in Oneiric srlinuxx 18/07/2011 - 11:26pm
Story Top 10 FPS Games for Linux srlinuxx 18/07/2011 - 11:25pm
Story Debian invites you to Debian Day srlinuxx 18/07/2011 - 11:23pm

Eric S. Raymond: Goodbye Fedora, Hello Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

After thirteen years as a loyal Red Hat and Fedora user, I reached my limit today, when an attempt to upgrade one (1) package pitched me into a four-hour marathon of dependency chasing, at the end of which an attempt to get around a trivial file conflict rendered my system unusable.

Jono Bacon: New Ubuntu community toys

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have always believed in open community processes. Those companies who have shown a commitment to open processes have been more successful in the Open Source and free software world. Creating an open community is only half of the challenge though, I am keen to achieve the dizzy heights of open and effective community.

Opening up an open-source roadblock

Filed under
OSS

The open-source community is being roiled by the recent deal between Microsoft and Novell. The Free Software Foundation wants to use the ongoing revision of the General Public License that controls Linux and other major open-source programs to hamstring this deal and to prevent other software distributors, whether proprietary or open-source, from adopting anything similar.

Carnegie Mellon Folds Open Source Into New Degree Offering

Filed under
OSS

The software industry isn't what it used to be. Open source software, globalization and outsourcing have irrevocably changed the sector and the skills needed by those who choose to work in it. The Master of Science (MS) program in Software Management announced by Carnegie Mellon West, will offer students a hands-on, team-oriented education that both bolsters and breaks with tradition.

How To Search For Missing Packages With apt-file On Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This short article describes how you can search for missing packages with apt-file on Debian and Ubuntu systems. apt-file allows you to search for a file name, and it gives back the name(s) of the package(s) containing that file so that you can install the appropriate package.

New Mono release lets VB developers compile under Linux

Filed under
Software

The latest release of Mono, an open source implementation of Microsoft's .Net platform, bundles a Visual Basic compiler authored by Rolf Bjarne. The compiler -- itself written in Visual Basic -- will ease development and deployment of applications written in one of the most popular programing languages.

Open Source University: Getting Students Involved

Filed under
OSS

Theory versus practice - I don't think there’s a better solution in making sure that software developers are ready for the challenges of tomorrow than catching them while they are still in school, and then plugging them into an open source software project.

Delete Files Older Than x Days on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

The find utility on linux allows you to pass in a bunch of interesting arguments, including one to execute another command on each file. We’ll use this in order to figure out what files are older than a certain number of days, and then use the rm command to delete them.

Perl script to monitor disk space and send an email

Filed under
HowTos

How to write a perl script that can monitor my disk space under UNIX or Linux and send me an email alert? There is a nice perl system routine called Perl df or Filesys::DiskSpace.

HOWTO: EncFS Encrypted Filesystem in Ubuntu and Fedora GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

I mentioned recently that I planned to keep using TrueCrypt in GNU/Linux since I had used it profitably in Windows. I’m reevaluating my plan. Maybe it was time to figure out how to encrypt the entire drive with a non-container method, and I wanted to look away from TrueCrypt since I’m interested in crypto diversity.

The Switch To KDE : Day 2

Filed under
KDE

Well I’m coming to the close of a second day now with KDE. I have to say that this second day wasn’t quite as pleasant as the first. I don’t know if it is simlpy a big work load that is causing me stress but I am getting frustrated in not being able to get as much done as I want.

attempting to import MS Money data

Filed under
Software

For most of our home computing needs, I've long since transitioned from a Window's environment to FOSS alternatives. Edubuntu as our operating system with the standard list of applications. However, I still dual-boot our system to accommodate a few hold-outs running on Windows.

The massive failure of foss

Filed under
OSS

“The open source software movement has been one of the successes of the digital age” or so says Clay Shirky of New York University's Graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program in the latest issue of Harvard Business Review. Yes, sure, but he's just buttering us up.

Store passwords securely in Firefox

Filed under
HowTos

Most of us visit a lot of websites, and we have a need to login to many of these sites. We know that it would be a bad idea to use the same password for all online accounts, so we create unique passwords for each site. However, it is impossible for us to remember all of these passwords so we tell Firefox to remember them for us.

SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Beta 6 expands NVIDIA Beryl support

Filed under
Linux

SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Beta 6 is now available for downloading and testing, the project announced today. The new release allows users to optionally select between two NVIDIA drivers, the latest v1.0.9746 or a legacy version (v1.0.9631), to maximize Beryl support for both newer and older chips, the project said.

Fabrice Facorat: Cooker : The Inside Man V

Filed under
MDV

What's happening in cooker recently? Some things include: since Xorg 7.2 ( x11-server-1.2 ), Nvidia users were having issues when trying to use 3D desktop, Olivier Blin gave the procedure to test Metisse under Cooker, Colin Guthrie pointed out the fact that with the new build system 64 bits Cooker was nearly in sync with 32 bits Cooker, and Warly will be missed.

Record a Desktop Video on SLED

Filed under
HowTos

After posting a couple videos from my SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 system, some network admins have asked me to share how I record these. One said that he sees practical use in creating how-to videos for his end users. So here is how I set up my SLED10 system for capturing my desktop as a video file.

man is your friend

Filed under
HowTos

The command line is great. When you know how to use it properly, it can be the fastest way to achieve a task and it is endlessly extensible. The problem is, commands and their syntax can be really tricky to remember. Thankfully, help is at hand, thanks to man.

Gnome Menu Mockup: Kill the application browser

Filed under
Software

Recently Miguel de Icaza blogged about version 2 of gnome-main-menu, available from Gnome’s SVN, so I decided to give it a try. A thing I hate is to have an external window when “More Applications…” is clicked, why not to put the application links directly in the menu?

Snort no fort, could be mugged by bug

Filed under
Security

A flaw in Snort, the popular open-source intrusion detection system, could be used by attackers to run malicious code on vulnerable machines, several security organizations reported yesterday.

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.