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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Commercial Companies Support Open Source Projects srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 4:49pm
Story NeonView 0.2.0 Image Viewer First Version Released Chris7mas 28/09/2011 - 2:43pm
Story GNOME 3.2 Has A New File Manager Available srlinuxx 1 28/09/2011 - 5:16am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 5:05am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 4:54am
Story Desura Beta Client Hands-On Impressions srlinuxx 28/09/2011 - 2:33am
Story Get Out Of Your Comfort Zone srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:40pm
Story Open Source, Open Mind srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:36pm
Story Fedora and RHEL Documentation srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 11:32pm
Story Glamor Project Is Called To Be Merged Into X.Org Server srlinuxx 27/09/2011 - 9:24pm

Tux Droid... cool toy, or Tuxploitation?

Filed under
Misc

A Belgian firm is shipping a wireless robot shaped like Tux, the Linux mascot. The KYSOH (Keep Your Sense of Humor) "Tux Droid" itself does not run Linux, however, leading some early observers to question whether the gadget exploits the Tux form factor unfairly.

Google starts running Dell Linux Desktop ads

Filed under
Linux

On March 28, Dell quietly announced that it would start offering a variety of laptops and desktops with pre-installed Linux. Now, Dell has started advertising its Linux desktops on Google ads.

While working on my personal blog site, which happens to have Google Adsense ads running on it, I was surprised to find Google ads for Linux-powered Dell desktops showing up. Here's what I saw:

Vector Programming with GCC

Filed under
HowTos

The original intention of C was to provide a portable substitute for assembly language for implementing UNIX. C semantics are very similar to those of the PDP-11; for example, C includes shift operations but not rotation, because the PDP-11 didn’t have a rotate instruction. C did register naming for you, but everything else was designed to be trivial to map to an assembly language.

Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

This short guide describes how you can configure your GNOME desktop to display various icons such as My Computer, Network Servers, Trash, etc. on the desktop. By default, these items are placed on one of the panels (Trash) or hidden in the Places menu.

Do You Have Questions You'd Like to Ask FSF About GPLv3?

Filed under
OSS

Well, we've had some time to think about the new draft of GPLv3, and many of us have some questions. There is a new GPLv3 draft 3 FAQ that answers some questions that have already come up, like what do the brackets mean in the draft (that they are possible inclusions, but not certain - more on that in a minute).

Changing the Console resolution

Filed under
HowTos

If you run Ubuntu on a laptop or other LCD monitor, ever wanted to get the console font perfect?

Heres how.

enter the console or open a terminal window and enter;

sudo nano /boot/grub/menu.lst

Now in there should be a line, # defoptions=quiet splash

add one of the corresponded lines appropriate for the resolution you prefer or require.

San Francisco Turns To Open Source For Mapping Urban Forest

Filed under
OSS

How can open source software be harnessed to help solve environmental issues? The City of San Francisco is now starting to find that out, by turning to MapGuide Open Source software for use in its "urban forest" initiative.

Process XML using XQuery

Filed under
News

Learn to search your data easier and more naturally with XQuery 1.0.

Gnumeric vs. OpenOffice.org Calc

Filed under
OOo

In my previous post OpenOffice.org Calc prevailed against KSpread, but now it's faces a new challenger. Will Gnumeric have what it takes to win the crown? Gnumeric is a Free, open source spreadsheet from the GNOME project.

I tested with Gnumeric version 1.7.0 in Kubuntu Edgy and 1.7.8 in Kubuntu Feisty. For Calc I used version 2.0.4.

Format Compatibility

Has open source gone too far?

Filed under
Misc

I come in for criticism here when I write about the open source concept being extended into areas like politics and journalism.

It doesn't belong there, the critics charge. Where's the license agreement? You're rendering the concept meaningless.

OK, so how about cars? Or music?

Anaconda Improvements In F7T3

Filed under
Linux

Anaconda, the Red Hat / Fedora installer, has seen a few minor changes with Fedora 7 Test 3. I have provided screenshots of the most evident changes to the end-user, which consists of alterations on the pages for disk, time zone, and the actual install process.

On the way to Beryl-Compiz Merge

Filed under
Software

After months of talking (possibly more lines than there are lines of code in both projects) things seems to be on the right track for merged project..

Balancing discussion

Filed under
Misc

Recently the subject of mailing list discussion and offensiveness has erupted in the community. This has been triggered by a joke being sent to a list and the fallout that ensued after it. I am not going to comment on the specifics of that incident, but instead look at what I consider a critical issue here - the balance between political correctness and abusive discussion.

Henry's Tech Advice #6 - Deleting Spaces

Filed under
Linux
Humor

Frustrated writes: Henry. I have a problem with a text file. There are spaces at the beginning of most of the lines and I need to get rid of them. Can you suggest an easy way to do this?

Greetings Frustrated. You have certainly come to the right place, for I am Henry the Adequate, superhero, and my computer guru-ness is second only to that guy who empties the bins at the office.

n/a

Get Slack

Filed under
Slack

Slackware is the most venerable of Linux distributions, loved and trusted by hordes of users, sysadmins and programmers around the world for its solidity and closeness to the ground. Slackware comes from an earlier time when Linux users were almost exclusively hackers who walked the command line without fear or prejudice, scorned the world of point and click, and never went out overdressed.

Speed Up Google Analytics

Filed under
Google
HowTos

This method uses crontab to execute a shell script that downloads an updated urchin.js file every 24 hours and saves it into your local sites directory so that it can be served by your web server instead of the google-analytics.com web server.

You are in control with free software, Internet guru says

Filed under
OSS

Richard Stallman doesn't own an MP3 player. He doesn't own a mobile telephone. In fact, this techno-visionary -- a founder of the Free Software Foundation -- doesn't use any of the usual computer programs many people use.

FSF admits defeat on Apache

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation has admitted defeat in its attempts to ensure that the forthcoming GNU GPLv3 is compatible with the Apache and Eclipse licenses, meaning that code from some of the leading free and open source projects can still not be merged.

Advanced SSH security tips and tricks

Filed under
HowTos

In this article I'll show you some simple tricks to help you tighten security for your secure shell (SSH) service.

The SSH server configuration file is located in /etc/ssh/sshd_conf. You need to restart the SSH service after every change you make to that file in order for changes to take effect.

Change SSH listening port

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more

Mercedes and Kia add new Android Auto models

Buying a new car comes with myriad of considerations. Is it fuel efficient? Is it safe? Will it play nicely with my phone? People sometimes neglect the last one, but you're going to be carrying the phone literally every time you get in the car, so why not make sure? Mercedes and Kia seem to get that. They've added support for Android Auto to a ton of new cars today. Read more