Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Firefox passes 400 million downloads

Filed under
Moz/FF

c|net: Firefox just passed the 400 million download mark, according to the Spread Firefox site for promoting the open-source, extendable Web browser.

Did open source win the BBC iPlayer fight?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: To hear UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown tell it, open source advocates have won their fight to force open the BBC iPlayer to other platforms. Yeah. Open source wins. Right? Not necessarily.

Also: Eudora open source e-mail client beta makes debut

KDE 4.0 Release Schedule Revised

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE Release Team has revised the release schedule for KDE 4.0. The first visible bits of KDE 4.0 will be the KDE Development Platform release on October, 30. The final and long awaited release of the KDE Desktop 4.0 is planned for December, 11th 2007, well in time to be a Christmas present for everyone who has been longing for KDE 4.0.

Also: KMediaFactory for KDE4

10 ways Linux can breath life into your old PCs

Filed under
Linux

icanhaslinux.com: Yesterday, I was trying to figure out what to do with a spare Athlon XP 1600+ box that I have. I wrote down some of my ideas and threw in some others I’ve used in the past. If you’re looking for ways to reuse that old PC, just peruse this list.

Dell criticized over difficulty in selecting Linux

Filed under
Linux

techspot: Many people, myself included, have praised Dell for going back on years of marketing tactics and choosing to offer a desktop Linux distro as a standard option for people buying their machines. But are they making it easy to choose?

Also: Dell's Linux sleight of hand

Best Linux Desktop Distribution for Home Users

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: I started using Linux (Red Hat 9) on my home computer in 2003 and my first question like all Linux Newbies was: "What is a Best Desktop Linux Distribution for home users?”

Creating cute graphic-filled borders in OpenOffice Writer

Filed under
HowTos

openoffice.org tips: One of the nice things about Microsoft products is that they have a lot of prefab goodies. OpenOffice.org is a little more of a from-scratch situation. But you have much more flexibility, and you can still do a lot of great stuff. It's not easy, at least not using this approach, to add borders all around, but you can do it in the top and bottom.

ATI Radeon HD 2400/2600 On Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix: What do we have for you today? With the 8.41 display driver we have completed some additional benchmarks using the Radeon HD 2400PRO 256MB and Radeon HD 2600PRO 256MB graphics cards. In this article, we see if these two mid-range ATI Radeon HD 2000 graphics cards are able to compete against NVIDIA's GeForce 8 series.

Secrets of the man command

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: The most referenced and most often used command on any Linux distribution is man, which lets users read the manual pages of other commands. Here are a couple of less well-known but useful commands that let you bookmark a position within a man page, and test a command you read from the man page without closing the page.

Commercial open source DOES add value

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Advocate: I want to discuss one of the ideas that Bruce Perens mentioned. He believes that open source vendors are not necessary, and that they do not add any value to the open source movement. I disagree with him on this point, and I will share my reasons below.

A quick guide to DVD authoring

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you have video footage that you want to capture, edit, and share with friends or family (or even use professionally), you'll be happy to know that you can do it all with open source tools. I'll show you how to author a DVD that can play on most home players.

My Opera synchronization explained

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: My Opera synchronization is a feature of Kestrel which is designed to let you keep the same bookmarks and speed dials on different computers with Opera installed.

Linux: Improving kswapd

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: The attached patch will make kswapd stop paging out data from zones when there is more than enough memory free. We do go above zone->pages_high in order to keep pressure between zones equal in normal circumstances, but the patch should prevent the kind of excesses that made Sami's computer totally unusable.

BitTorrent - downloading large files made easy

Filed under
Software

vertito.blogspot: BitTorrent, an extremely handy tool on downloading large torrent files regardless of internet speed rate you have with interruption between connection breakups.

Microsoft starts a "Get the Facts" campaign...against itself

Filed under
Microsoft

matt asay: You've got to hand it to Microsoft. It hates ANYTHING and ANYONE that gets in its way of selling its software. Including, apparently, itself.

Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B

Filed under
Reviews

The last Kanotix release (based on Debian Sid) came out in October, 2006. Shortly thereafter, a Kanotix co-developer (and many of Kanotix's other developers) left the project, mainly due to a disagreement over whether Kanotix should be based on Sid (Debian's unstable branch) or something less volatile, like Etch (Debian's current stable branch) or Ubuntu. Kanotix's founder now has a new, Etch-based version of Kanotix in development, code-named "Thorhammer."

today's leftover links

Filed under
News
  • Mac, Linux BBC iPlayers in the offing, says PM

  • A childlike pleasure can be derived from a computing catastrophe
  • Linux Based PLAYSTATION®3 System to Power Office 2.0 Conference
  • Which OS You Use Can Depend On What Looks Good
  • Linux Community Chuckles at Slowdown Prediction
  • Linus' new T-Shirt
  • HP OfficeJet 5610 works well with Ubuntu
  • Geneva Public Library moves to Ubuntu
  • Licensing issues
  • PyClock 0.1.0, Now with some Images!
  • Why I’m staying with Debian
  • Parliamentarians to discuss Open Source software

Samba 4 Moves Closer to Active Directory Server Compatibility

Filed under
Software

linux-watch: For years, if you wanted an inexpensive, but Windows-compatible file and print server, you turned to Samba running on Linux. Now, with the first alpha release of Samba 4, this open-source project is moving closer to becoming a complete Windows 2003/Longhorn replacement.

BSG: Beyond the Red Line on Ubuntu

Filed under
Gaming

just uber: Battlestar Galactica: Beyond the Red Line is a 3D space combat simulation which takes place inside the Battlestar Galactica universe. The game is free, and the good folks over at Game Warden have also released a Linux client for it. Here’s how to get it up and running on Ubuntu.

Palm shakes hands with Linux

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: I decided that I needed the Palm back in my life. So it was time to get the Palm and Linux talking to each other. I'd had bad experiences before in Ubuntu with J-Pilot -- it's hell just to get the Palm to sync with the Linux box. This time it was different.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news