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Wednesday, 26 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google's robotics program has legs, but where is it going? Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:42am
Story Android 4.3 flavors Sony Xperia Z1, Xperia Z Ultra Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:36am
Story How And Why I Switched to Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:33am
Story The Open-Sorcerers Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:30am
Story OpenDocument ODF Support Coming To The Web Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:24am
Story AMD Catalyst 13.12 GPU Driver For Linux Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:19am
Story Chromebase: A Chrome OS All-in-One PC from LG due at CES 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:15am
Story Latest Stable LibreOffice 4.1.4 Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:10am
Story Linux Australia membership falls by 10 per cent Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 10:00am
Story Lini PC offers small Linux computers with Haswell chips Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 9:55am

Ubuntu: first stop on the road to Damascus

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire blogs: In nearly 10 years of experimenting with, and, later, using Linux, I have never been presented with a situation where someone actually asked me to preside over their initial foray into the use of the open source operating system on a regular basis.

Open source values: Consensus

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Consensus by Rick VoermanLast week I wrote about transparency as an open source value. Today, in the second of this informal series, I want to discuss the value called consensus.

Benchmark Your Linux System with HardInfo

Filed under
Software

tombuntu: Want to compare your computer’s performance? HardInfo is a system profiler and benchmark for Linux systems. It can gather information about your computer and operating system, perform a varitety of benchmarks, and export the data to HTML.

OLPC community-based testing

Filed under
OLPC

gregdek.livejournal: If you've been interested in working on OLPC, but have no idea how to get started, consider becoming a tester of activities. Check out the Activity Testing Matrix.

Also: OLPC XO User Review

Is 2008 the Year of the Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

linux magazine: No doubt you've heard the prediction before — "this is going to be the year of the Linux desktop." At the risk of being repetitive, though, I'm going to go ahead and say it: 2008 really could be the year of the Linux desktop.

Paravirtualized Ubuntu shows early performance promise

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Early testing has shown that Ubuntu, when run as a virtual guest taking advantage of the new paravirt-ops paravirtualization interface, delivers as promised: it runs faster and more efficiently that it would as an unmodified guest.

1,500 companies adopt Oracle Unbreakable Linux

linuxworld: Oracle Wednesday said that 1,500 companies have signed up for its Unbreakable Linux discount support program since it was announced one year ago

Ubuntu scores first major pre-installed server win

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-watch: Ubuntu is extremely popular on the desktop, but it's made comparatively little progress on servers. That's about to change. Dell is expected to announce in the first quarter of 2008 that it has certified Ubuntu Linux for its server lines.

Hands-on with the OLPC XO laptop

Filed under
OLPC

infosyncworld.com: We finally get a close look at the One Laptop Per Child XO laptop, and though nobody could explain the interface, the hardware was pretty cool.

Ceph Distributed Network File System

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Ceph is a distributed network file system designed to provide excellent performance, reliability, and scalability with POSIX semantics. I periodically see frustration on this list with the lack of a scalable GPL distributed file system with sufficiently robust replication and failure recovery to run on commodity hardware, and would like to think that--with a little love--Ceph could fill that gap."

Scalable Public Key Infrastructure for both OpenSWAN and OpenVPN

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: User management and the related cryptographic authentication infrastructure is a major hurdle in deploying scalable, manageable VPNs (Virtual Private Networks). Two major pieces of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) for VPNs are OpenSWAN and OpenVPN.

Open Source: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

LinuxInsider: When it comes time to upgrade to a new version of proprietary software -- take the Windows OS, for example -- many users are less than thrilled. Upgrades can mean an added expense for anything more extensive than a bug fix or minor feature upgrades.

KWin Basics - Part 1.2.1 - Advanced Window Management - Window identification

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

gnuski.blogspot: Yesterday we looked at the basic "Keep Above" and "Keep Below" options within KWin. Today lets get a bit more technical -- permanent identification. When you right-click on that title bar and select Advanced, you get the options:

Kile rationalizes LaTeX

Filed under
Software

linux.com: You can think of Kile as an IDE for the LaTeX document layout system. Instead of requiring you to learn a considerable amount of markup language, as LaTeX itself does, or providing you with a graphical interface that hides you from the complexity, as Lyx does, Kile automates the process of working with LaTeX while keeping the markup visible.

Five More Desktop Blog Editors for GNU/Linux Users

Filed under
Software

beans.seartipy.com: There were some excellent suggestions about very good blog editors for the GNU/Linux platform provided in the comments section of my previous post Five Desktop Blog Editors for GNU/Linux Users. So much so that I have decided to compile a second list.

Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, SimplyMEPIS - 3 distros, 9 wireless stories

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Just as as I was getting comfortable using Ubuntu on my desktop, enthusiastic readers have assailed me with stories about how I should give other Linux distros a try - particularly the KDE pair PCLinuxOS and SimplyMEPIS. I'm lucky to have four different computers at my immediate disposal so I tried the live CDs of the three distros on three of them to see how plug and play they were for wireless networking. The results were quite surprising.

Server to server: MacOS X vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

Paul Murphy: It appears that the big changes in the server version focus on ease of use, particularly with respect to network setup, and on getting along in a predominantly Windows environment. When you compare MacOS X server to Linux, however, the key advantage for small businesses isn’t capital cost, it’s ease of setup and use.

Enabling Compiz Fusion On A Fedora 8 GNOME Desktop (ATI Mobility Radeon 9200)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on a Fedora 8 GNOME desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Not the final ones, but... another Oxygen Wallpaper

  • PXE Kickstart Installations Basics
  • Configuring kanguru (huawei e220 modem) on openSUSE 10.3
  • Qt frontend for PackageKit
  • If the truth about Linux hurts … shoot the messenger
  • Sebastien Bacher: GNOME and Ubuntu
  • Developer crafts Linux support for Logitech Harmony remote controls
  • NVClock to Phoronix: I'm not dead yet!
  • Flipping angry with Ubuntu
  • The Linux revolution has started!
  • Is Open Source Recession-Proof?
  • Perl 5.10 for People Who Aren't Totally Insane
  • MailX - Mail Facility via Terminal
  • Bash Shell Completing File, User and Host Names Automatically
  • IPBlock - Graphical IP Blocker
  • Linux Files and Folders Local Copying
  • Android vs. OpenMoko: Who Will Win?

KDE Commit-Digest for 11th November 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Resurgent development work on KDevelop 4, with work on code parsing, code completion and the user interface. Support for converting the KVTML XML-based format to HTML in KDE-Edu. Support for the much-wanted feature of multiple album root paths in Digikam. Various continued developments in Amarok 2.

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GNOME News

  • Desk Changer is a Wallpaper Slideshow Extension for GNOME
    Have you been looking for a GNOME wallpaper slideshow extension? If so, you can stop. In the comments to our recent post on the way GNOME handles wallpapers a number of readers asked whether GNOME had an image slideshow feature built in, without the need for third-party apps and the like. The answer is yes, GNOME does. Sort of.
  • Minwaita: A Compact Version of Theme Adwaita for Gnome Desktop
    As you may already know that Ubuntu is switching back to Gnome, this is the transition time for Ubuntu to switch back. Some creators are motivated and creating themes for Gnome desktop, which is a good thing and hopefully we shall see plenty of Gnome themes and icons around soon. As its name shows "Minwaita" it is minimal/compact version of Adwaita theme, the theme is available after some enhancements to make Gnome more sleek and more vanilla Gnome experience without moving to away from Adwaita's design. This theme is compatible with Gnome 3.20 and up versions. This theme was released back in November, 2016 and still in continuous development that means if you find any problem or bug in the theme then report it to get it fixed in the next update. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Gnome Pomodoro Timer Can Help You Increase Productivity
    If you are struggling with focus on something, it could be your work or study then try Pomodoro technique, this method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. You can read more about Pomodoro here.
  • Widget hierarchies in GTK+ 4.0
    In GTK+3, only GtkContainer subclasses can have child widgets. This makes a lot of sense for “public” container children like we know them, e.g. GtkBox — i.e. the developer can add, remove and reorder child widgets arbitrarily and the container just does layout.

Red Hat News