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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story To migrate or not to migrate to open source srlinuxx 10/12/2012 - 7:23pm
Story Preparing Slax 7 Final Release srlinuxx 10/12/2012 - 7:18pm
Story Ubuntu 12.10 in Pictures srlinuxx 10/12/2012 - 7:12pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 486 srlinuxx 10/12/2012 - 4:51pm
Story Debian Project News - December 10th srlinuxx 10/12/2012 - 4:50pm
Story How To Install XFCE On Linux Mint 14 falko 10/12/2012 - 9:14am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 09/12/2012 - 9:30pm
Story Ubuntu 13.04 hits alpha, but details are under wraps srlinuxx 09/12/2012 - 8:08pm
Story Ubuntu Spyware: What to Do? srlinuxx 09/12/2012 - 8:06pm
Story SUSE Linux Says Btrfs is Ready to Roll srlinuxx 07/12/2012 - 6:48pm

Are we finally seeing the year of the Linux desktop?

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: This past month has seen a flurry activity from a number of players in the Linux desktop space. Red Hat, Suse, Ubuntu, Dell, Lenovo and even Intel white box system builders are getting into the act. Is the year of the Linux desktop finally upon us or is this just another flare up generated by the Linuxworld conference in San Francisco?

Inside KDE - The Trash System

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: In KDE there are a wide number of very visible and useful applications that people use every day. We've already covered some of these in our "The Lesser Apps of KDE" series, in this series we plan to dig a little deeper and bring out a lot of other great things about KDE you may not know about. In our first article today, we're going to look at KDE's trash system.

Use Linux over Windows with Xming

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: One of the nice things about the X Window System is its ability to display X apps running remotely on a local machine. One of the not-so-nice things about Microsoft Windows is the complete lack of native support for displaying X applications. If you find yourself working on Windows but wanting to use Linux apps at the same time, Xming can do the job.

Today's Left-Overs:

Filed under
News
  • QuakeCon Wrapup (& Carmack Interview)

  • Open Source Projects and Corporations
  • Linux database becomes a browser
  • Why doesn’t kudzu ask me to setup a new network card on system start?
  • Mandriva Linux 2008 Beta 1 'Cassini'
  • Merging "Open Source" and "Free Software"

Multisite CVS Drupal Installation on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This howto shows you how to do a multi-site Drupal install on Ubuntu. It also covers how to layout your directories for ease of maintenance, and how to ensure that you can update Drupal easily from CVS.

Safeguarding Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

techzone: A friend of mine has Fedora, with Security enhanced Linux kernel. I thought that was an overkill for desktop use. We started a debate on this and decided to check our system against vulnerabilities. Now it was a matter of "my computer" vs "his computer".

And: The quickest way to keying an SSH login
And: How to Install the Eternity Screensaver in Ubuntu

KRename: powerful renaming tool

Filed under
Software

Debian Package of the Day: KRename is a powerful batch renaming tool for KDE that allows to rename lots of files in one step. The design of the program is suitable for both advanced and novice users.

New widget library for GNOME includes transparent radial menu and other bling

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Karl Lattimer has created an experimental radial menu widget for GNOME called Fittsmenu. The Fittsmenu widget still has some glitches, but it is an impressive demonstration of the potential for practical GNOME user interface enhancements that support visually attractive features like transparency.

6 Reasons I Don’t Use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxbraindump.org: According to Distrowatch, the top spot in the the world of Linux distributions belongs to Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS, with Fedora routinely coming in at fourth or fifth. So why don’t I use Ubuntu if it’s supposed to be the best?

And: Ubuntu Linux: The New Linux Standard for the Desktop – Or Just Wishful Thinking?

TinyMe Test 5 released!

Filed under
PCLOS

mypclinuxos.com: TinyMe test 5 has been released! If you liked test 4.1, you’re going to love test 5. Smile I am really excited about this release. A lot of late night hours and hard work have gone into test 5. This will hopefully be our last test release before TinyMe Final.

And: PCLinuxOS 2007 Install Notes

Dell expands Linux PC sales to Europe, China

Filed under
Linux

Reuters: Dell Inc said on Tuesday it has decided to expand sales of consumer personal computers loaded with the Linux operating system to the United Kingdom, France, Germany and China.

Also: Dell Eyes PCs Running Linux, Windows At Same Time
And: Dell Talks Linux Virtualization Redux
And: SUSE Linux to be offered Pre-Installed on Dells in China

Wolvix 1.1 Hunter Review

Filed under
Linux

I am not sure how will it work out for advanced desktop users, as lot of them will have preferences regarding KDE and GNOME. But for an average desktop perspective it is really great distro which runs really well on older computer.

EnGarde — Secure Linux Server

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

polishlinux: This will be an unusual review, due to the fact that the distribution under review doesn’t have an X server, and you don’t really need to login on it to work… This review is about EnGarde Secure Server 3.0.16 developed by Guardian Digital company with the help of the community.

Fedora 7: Community remix

Filed under
Linux

red hat mag: One of the popular features of Fedora 7 is the ability to remix Fedora and build your own custom version. Now don’t get me wrong–building a new distribution is nice. But what about those who wish to create their own Fedora-based project?

The 64-Bit Experience With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Caitlyn Martin: Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been able to borrow a friend’s laptop. She has the 64-bit version of Ubuntu Feisty Fawn installed. This is my first chance to play with 64-bit Linux extensively on a laptop.

Liferea

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Feed technology is great - it allows you to have your favourite sites to keep you updated with the latest content and push it out to you. There are many different reader applications out there, from the web-based, to the desktop and even in the mobile space. One such desktop application for Linux and other Unix platforms is Liferea.

Big savings with Linux desktop: IBM, Novell

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: IBM and Novell are set to do battle with Microsoft on the desktop with the launch of a new open-source software bundle that promises savings for users.

Editing music scores with free software

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Not everyone needs to work with music scores on their computers, but if you're someone who does enter, edit, or store sheet music electronically, you can choose among many free software options.

Amarok Plasmification

Filed under
KDE

amarok blogs: we've decided that for amarok 2.0 we want to emphasize what used to be called the "context browser" in amarok 1.x speak. we decided to break out the context browser into its own central widget.

Desktop Linux: That dog will mount

Filed under
Linux

the register: The Linux desktop reminds us of a dog humping a table leg. It's both fun and disturbing to watch, but ultimately there's very little payoff from the exercise.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India