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About Tux Machines

Friday, 24 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Antergos Linux 2013.05.12 review srlinuxx 20/05/2013 - 10:04pm
Story Ubuntu vs. Windows 8: Which Is Better Overall? srlinuxx 20/05/2013 - 9:29pm
Story Before Mageia 3: Mageia 2 in Perspective Redux srlinuxx 20/05/2013 - 9:22pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 508 srlinuxx 20/05/2013 - 12:07pm
Story Mageia 3 Released with Steamy Goodness srlinuxx 20/05/2013 - 12:04pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 19/05/2013 - 7:10pm
Story Dogfooding the Ubuntu Phone srlinuxx 18/05/2013 - 8:12pm
Story few odds & ends: srlinuxx 18/05/2013 - 7:17pm
Story 10 amazing Linux desktop environments you've probably never seen srlinuxx 17/05/2013 - 5:33pm
Story 7 open source projects to cut your teeth on srlinuxx 17/05/2013 - 5:29pm

Xara Xtreme for Linux, a powerful graphics program

Filed under
Software

Linux Tip: Xara Xtreme for Linux is a powerful, general purpose graphics program for Unix platforms including Linux, FreeBSD and (in development) OS-X. Xara Xtreme is based on Xara Xtreme for Windows.

IBM and OpenOffice.org Headlines

Filed under
OOo
  • IBM and OpenOffice.org: An Interview with IBM's Doug Heintzman

  • IBM Joins OpenOffice.org: The Q&A
  • IBM Joins OpenOffice.org (The Quick Analysis)
  • IBM makes Microsoft code Open Sauce
  • IBM beats Microsoft over the head with its own code
  • Using OO.o to Beat MSFT in Other Markets

today's leftovers & such

Filed under
News
  • VMware Tools Available as Open Source

  • All systems go for validation of updated OpenSSL module
  • Dell E521 and PCLinuxOS 2007 Final
  • Defining Scheduler Task Groups
  • FSOSS 2007 Coming Up!
  • FOSSCamp 2007
  • Linux 2.6.23-rc6
  • Legal summits to tackle Linux
  • IRC Part 2 - Managing a Channel
  • Linux Ping command explained
  • Linux Done Right: A user’s pleasant surprise
  • Another brave horseman steps up
  • Linux kernel enable the IOMMU - input / output memory management unit support
  • Open Source Outlook Choices
  • Plan of Action for Building Communities
  • Windows Vista Aero vs Linux Ubuntu Beryl

Dell releases custom Ubuntu 7.04 ISOs with drivers and fixes

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: Dell has released a custom "remastered" Ubuntu 7.04 installation CD ISO that can be used to install Ubuntu on an Inspiron 1420 or 530. The ISO automatically installs all of the drivers and fixes that are required to make Ubuntu fully functional on those systems.

Using Cedega to play Windows games

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Many of you, Linux users, have Windows installed on your PCs for only one reason: it’s a game or a program, written only for the Redmond’s system. In the last few months true alternatives have appeared: Cedega and CrossOverOffice.

Mozilla shows mock-up of Firefox 3.0's Places

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld: Mozilla has posted mock-ups of Places, one of the most-awaited new features in the upcoming Firefox 3.0., on its Web site. The Places Organizer mock-up uses Windows-Vista styling to show bookmarks, surfing history and downloads in one spot.

A very quick look at elive

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: elive was the last stop on this little four-day distro-hopping junket for the ugly little laptop, and to be honest, I only tried it because someone suggested it on one of the other reviewlets. I’m glad I took a look though: This is a very impressive desktop.

Wearing the Red Hat: A review of CentOS 3.9

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: It's not in the "one small step for man" category, but my quest to run something -- anything -- from Red Hat on my VIA C3 Samuel-equipped test box has finally been successful. But not without a lot of effort.

PC- BSD Day 7: Ports of Call

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Today I spend most of day on a Windows box. Alas, but my boss won’t allow anything but Windows on the workfloor. When the time to play is in short supply I automatically focus on the tools that are created to make life easy. That focus was on graphical front-ends for the ports collection.

this and that

Filed under
News
  • Canonical to Provide Optimized Ubuntu OS Layer for VMware Virtual Appliances

  • Corner(ed) Office?
  • Eve Online Coming to Mac, Linux
  • Linux on the Mac
  • The RPM Fusion Project
  • Reboot a locked Linux box with the Magic SysRq Keys
  • Sun Solaris upgrade snuggles with Linux

An open source "Second Life" for Linden Lab

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Linden Lab, the creator of online virtual community Second Life, released its viewer earlier this year with a GPL 2.0 license, adding a clause called the "FLOSS exception," which releases developers using certain open source licenses from the requirement that any derivative works be licensed under the GPL.

Vector Linux 5.9-Pseudo64-0.1 -- Finally, 64-bit Vector

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: The first public Pseudo (alpha) release of Vector Linux 5.9 is now available. Normally a release like this wouldn’t be worth blogging about. It’s early development code. The point? There’s a 64-bit version.

FOSS in business?

Filed under
OSS

newyork-ubuntu: I am looking for people who are involved in businesses in New York, preferably non IT related businesses who have switched to using Free and Open Source Software. If you know of anyone who fits this description who would be willing to share their experience with the United Nations on Oct 16, please contact Nathan Eckenrode.

Is Linux Really Ready for Simple Users? (Part 1 of 8)

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: This engaging and insightful eight-part series by Kim Brebach, a consultant with an Australian technology marketing group, explores the suitability of desktop Linux for ordinary computer users. Follow Brebach's often-amusing foils and fumbles as he investigates a veritable alphabet soup of Linux distributions -- from Damn Small Linux to Zenwalk.

Running KDE on the Nokia N770 and N800

Filed under
KDE

arstechncia: An intrepid Internet Tablet Talk forum member with the handle "Penguinbait" has provided instructions explaining how to install KDE 3.5.6 on the Nokia 770 and N800 web tablet devices. Not for the faint of heart, the instructions require a bit of command-line work.

Also: KMLDonkey on KDE4
And: KDE-EDU 4.0 Polishing on Saturday

Countries' Comments on MS OOXML - How You Can Help

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: I think I see a way we could be really helpful to the ISO folks having to sort through all the 10,000 comments the various countries filed with their votes on MS OOXML.

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Zimbra or Google Calendar with Thunderbird and Lightning

  • Implementing quotas to restrict disk space usage
  • Transparent Terminal Windows
  • Increase the maximum number of pseudo - terminals ~ PTY on Linux for remote Login session
  • Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Open source in the UK: investigate, approve and ignore

Filed under
OSS

CBR: Over a year ago CBR published a look at the UK's adoption of open source software in the UK and promised a later update. That update is long overdue, and is also timely given that tomorrow some of the leading open source advocates in the country will gather in Westminster to debate the future of open source in this country.

Microsoft, Novell Win Key Linux Customers

Filed under
SUSE

informationweek: Add Siemens and BMW to the list of major corporations that have agreed to buy Novell(NOVL)'s Linux software and services through Microsoft(MSFT).

Ubuntu On The Road To Bloat

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Free Desktop: I boot my Ubuntu laptop and log in. Shortly after logging in, the IO onslaught begins. I open up a terminal and 'top' exposes the offender 'trackerd'. I begin the motion to kill it. This is a familiar sequence for me, something I have done every day since, well, so long ago I can't remember the exact day I started doing it. A few weeks, at least.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers