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About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 5:33am
Story Browser Wars: Usage stats srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:27am
Story Introducing Linvo GNU/Linux srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:25am
Story Manage Your Finances (Simply) in Linux with wxBanker srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:23am
Story Up Close & Personal with Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:39am
Story The Free Game Lag srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:36am
Story OpenOffice: Always the Bridesmaid, Never the Bride srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:33am
Story PCLinuxOS 2011.6 KDE review srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 11:07pm
Story Pardus 2011.1: Turkish Delight srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 10:44pm
Story The Dark Side of Distrohopping srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 10:20pm

No halo over open source

Filed under
OSS

Has open source lost its halo, as Eric Lai's Computerworld article suggests? Is open-source still a grassroots social movement made up of idealistic underdogs trying to revolutionize an amoral industry?

Or is that a straw-man argument cooked up for a slow news day?

beryl: usability, parts 4 & 5

Filed under
HowTos

One problem I often find with switchers (both in beryl and in other window managers) is that they either only give an icon (for conventional switchers) or three thumbnails. While you can switch through those three thumbnails, if you've got 10 or 15 windows open, it becomes quite unweildy to flick through them. Alternatively there is the new wheel/rotation feature for the switcher.

2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

The polls are closed, the data has been audited and the results are in. Here are the official results for the 2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards:

Distribution of the Year -

Ascii Art Video and Images

Filed under
HowTos

You can easily watch videos and view images in ascii. If you are ascii art fans, you will be amazed what libaa and libcaca capable of. libaa is a portable ascii art GFX library, where libcaca as well, is another ascii art library but it have better support such as unicode, 2048 colors etc.

Fedora and Ubuntu to incorporate Kernel-based virtualization

Filed under
Linux

The latest release of the Linux kernel, 2.6.20, includes integrated virtualization capabilities with the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). The KVM kernel module leverages x86 virtualization extensions included in various Intel and AMD processors. Several distributions, including Ubuntu and Fedora, are already preparing to include the KVM kernel module in upcoming releases.

Reuters news organization banned from reporting!

Filed under
Linux

The headline of this post is tongue-in-cheek (but of course you knew that already, right?). Reuters, to the best of my knowledge, has not been banned from reporting. Although based on some of their recent work, they should be.

New Microsoft deal in the works with Red Hat? Don’t bet on it

Filed under
Linux

There's a story making the rounds today that Microsoft is poised to sign a new technology partnership with Red Hat that could be as sweeping as the one it signed with Novell. There's only one problem with the report: Red Hat is denying it.

10 Linux commands you've never used

Filed under
HowTos

It takes years maybe decades to master the commands available to you at the Linux shell prompt. Here are 10 that you will have never heard of or used. They are in no particular order. My favorite is mkfifo.

Make Sure Your Machine Is On The Correct Time With ntpdate

Filed under
HowTos

I have been doing a lot of ssh connections between my machines lately and noticed that the times were different between each. I had assumed that each would be fairly close but one was even five minutes off. Well, that was an easy fix using ntpdate.

Grab Windows Internet Radio Streams in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ah, sadly, you can’t use streamripper. Sad Most radios use Windows streams, so we’ll have to use Mplayer to record it.

LinuxWorld New York: a longer name for a smaller show (videos)

Filed under
Linux

IDG's East Coast Linux gathering is now officially called the LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit (LWOSS). The inaugural 2007 version of the renamed conference was held February 14 and 15 in the conference area of the Marriott Marquis hotel in Manhattan, not in a huge convention center.

Techniques for memory debugging

Filed under
News

Exercise good memory-related coding practices by creating a comprehensive program to keep memory errors under control.

Bandwidth Monitoring Tools for Linux Users

Filed under
Software

Bandwidth in computer networking refers to the data rate supported by a network connection or interface. One most commonly expresses bandwidth in terms of bits per second (bps). Bandwidth represents the capacity of the connection. Here is the list of bandwidth monitoring tools for your network bandwidth.

LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Wrap Up--Is Open Source Really Superior?

Filed under
Linux

Without a doubt, the topic wasn't on the official list of conference tracks at LinuxWorld OpenSolutions Summit 2007. But among IT managers and developers who braved icy winds and snow to trek to the two-day show in New York City, talk was in the air over whether software emerging from the open source tradition is really any better than other software.

IT Job Titles Gone Wild

Filed under
Humor

I was in a meeting at my company where we did the usual introductory hand shake followed by a frenzied tossing of business cards on to the table for exchange. For once in our lives we could forgo all of those self-aggrandizing titles and meet people with cards that say it like we know it already.

Gnome vs KDE

Filed under
Software

It appears this old argument is flaring up again. Christian Schaller suggested Linus Torvalds should try using Gnome for a month and then report back on his experiences. Inspired by this I've decided to take up the challenge – all be it in the opposite direction.

Setting up a serial console

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial will show you how to set up a serial console on a Linux system, and connect to it via a null modem cable. This is quite useful if your Linux server is in a headless configuration (no keyboard or monitor), as it allows you to easily get a console on the system if there are any problems with it (especially network problems, when SSH is not available). In the end, the GRUB menu will appear over the serial link, as will the bootup messages (output when booting the system). I am using Debian Etch on the server and Ubuntu Edgy on my client, although this should work on any Linux distribution.

openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1

Filed under
SUSE

Last week I released openSUSE 10.3 Alpha1 and installed it on my laptop as well. There are not many user visible changes in the system, in most cases it looks like 10.2. But under the hood a number of changes have been done that will everybody:

Google should make a Linux

Filed under
Google

FOR THE CONSUMER desktop/laptop market, Linux has been a non-starter. Sure, you can find many many different flavours of Linux available online, but you can't go to the local Big Box store and get a PC loaded with Linux on it.

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More in Tux Machines

Leaving Windows for GNU/Linux

  • Eight free open source alternatives to Windows 10: Chrome, Ubuntu, Solus and more Linux-based alternatives - what's the best alternative to Windows OS?
    Initially released in 2004, Ubuntu is Debian-based and part of the open source Linux family. Ubuntu uses Unity as its default user interface and can be run on smartphones, tablets and PCs. Key features: Libre Office, Firefox, Thunderbird, built-in Ubuntu Software Center, F-spot, an image editor, an instant messaging client called Empathy, and Ubuntu Make (developer tools centre). Pros: Comes with popular open source software pre-installed, like Firefox and Libre Office. Cons: Unfamiliar interface, perhaps aimed at more technical audience.
  • Windows 10 computers crash when Amazon Kindles are plugged in
    Dozens of Microsoft Windows 10 users are reporting that their computers crash when plugging in Amazon Kindles. The issue appears to be caused by the recent Windows 10 Anniversary update. Users of Amazon’s Paperwhite and Voyage attempting to either transfer books or charge their devices via USB are seeing their various Windows 10 laptops and desktops locking up and requiring rebooting. Pooka, a user of troubleshooting forum Ten Forums said: “I’ve had a Kindle paperwhite for a few years no and never had an issue with connecting it via USB. However, after the recent Windows 10 updates, my computer BSOD’s [blue screen of death] and force restarts almost as soon as I plug my Kindle in.” On Microsoft’s forums, Rick Hale said: “On Tuesday, I upgraded to the Anniversary Edition of Windows 10. Last night, for the first time since the upgrade, I mounted my Kindle by plugging it into a USB 2 port. I immediately got the blue screen with the QR code. I rebooted and tried several different times, even using a different USB cable, but that made no difference.” Another forum user, Tuscat, who found the issue affected both an HP laptop and a Dell desktop said: “It’s pretty frustrating because I need to transfer some PDFs to the Kindle for my son’s school classes.” The issue appears to be affecting regular Windows 10 Anniversary update users and those on Microsoft’s Insider programme for pre-release software testing.

'Open' Processor

  • 25-core open source chip could pave way for monster 200,000-core PC
    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY BOFFINS have developed a 25-core open source processor that can be scaled to create a monster 200,000-core PC stuffed with 8,000 64-bit chips. The chip is called Piton after the metal spikes driven by rock climbers into mountain sides, and was presented at the Hot Chips symposium on high-performance computing in Cupertino this week.
  • New microchip demonstrates efficiency and scalable design
    Researchers at Princeton University have built a new computer chip that promises to boost performance of data centers that lie at the core of online services from email to social media. [...] Other Princeton researchers involved in the project since its 2013 inception are Yaosheng Fu, Tri Nguyen, Yanqi Zhou, Jonathan Balkind, Alexey Lavrov, Matthew Matl, Xiaohua Liang, and Samuel Payne, who is now at NVIDIA. The Princeton team designed the Piton chip, which was manufactured for the research team by IBM. Primary funding for the project has come from the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.
  • Manycore ‘Piton’ Climbs Toward 200,000-Core Peak

Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 16.10 Beta Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS and the Latest LXDE Desktop

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta launch, Simon Quigley from the Lubuntu Linux team released the first Beta build of the upcoming Lubuntu 16.10 operating system. Read more Also: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta Removes the Heads-Up Display (HUD) Feature Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 Beta 1 Released with GNOME 3.20 and GNOME 3.22 Beta Apps Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Beta Released, Ubuntu GNOME Has Experimental Wayland