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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Can Red Hat Linux make the desktop pay?

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: Microsoft's dismissive attitude of VDI, or virtual desktop infrastructure, is very similar to Red Hat's stance toward the desktop as a viable Linux commercial offering. Red Hat has said it has yet to figure out how to capitalise on the Linux desktop as a product, but now seems to be finding a way.

New firewall for the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The Netfilter development team's Patrick McHardy has released an alpha version of nftables, a new firewall implementation for the Linux kernel, with a user space tool for controlling the firewall.

Open-Source ATI Graphics In Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Ubuntu 9.04 (the Jaunty Jackalope) will be released towards the end of next month and it is picking up the Linux 2.6.28 kernel, GNOME 2.26, and other improvements like install-time support for the EXT4 file-system and some subtle improvements.

Firefox May Already Be Dead

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: This is an exciting time for Web browsers. Google Chrome is now available in alpha for Linux, and I downloaded it for Ubuntu.

Gaming in Linux

Filed under
Gaming

brajeshwar.com: Currently, Linux might not have as many games as Windows probably has but fact that Linux has a strong community of developers in its periphery shows a better future.

Xandros Presto: A Commercial Distribution You Might Appreciate

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: I agree with pavs when he wrote “How Not To Make a Commercial Linux Distribution”, but there are still some ideas and concepts out there that might be worth paying for.

PCLinuxOS 2009.1

Filed under
PCLOS

Linux, the adventure with benefits

Filed under
Linux

techideas.co.uk: A not so brief response to Andrew Brown’s article “Linux is still an adventure game, but now it’s really worth playing” in the The Guardian, Thursday 19 March 2009:

New version for RP-made Linux for gov’t ready

Filed under
Linux

inquirer.net: The fifth version of “Bayanihan” Linux for Government is ready, the Advanced Science and Technology Institute of the Department of Science and Technology (ASTI-DOST) said.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Kogan Agora Netbook PRO

  • Mandriva helps porting k3b in Qt4
  • Join the FSF book sprint and help author a new text
  • Texas Democrats push ODF standard
  • HP 2133 and Linux - Strange Happenings
  • Compiz 0.8.2 fully released
  • Freedom of Choice - My perspective
  • The Other Side of the Linux Hardware Story
  • New Gmail feature gives users a chance to Undo Send
  • Basic Video Editor For Ubuntu Called KDENLive
  • Fast Browsing, "Netscape" Style With Seamonkey
  • The Real Point of Novell SUSE Linux
  • Meet The Nettop: The Netbook's Thrifty Desktop Cousin
  • Schwartz: Sun is world's largest open source company
  • Whatever happened to…
  • Gentoo makes me beeping angry…
  • Where Was Linux In The Pwn2Own Contest?
  • Must-Have Free Open Source Tools for Freelancers

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • [HOWTO] setup a local rsync server

  • Bluetooth, GPRS mobile phone with Debian GNU/Linux
  • Setup NFS server on Gentoo
  • Install Your Own Ringtones with Ubuntu and BitPim
  • Commandline 101: Using top
  • OOo: How to make text wrap inside an object
  • When did I start work today
  • Installing Parallels Desktop 4 Tools on PCLOS 2009 Guest
  • Ubuntu Package Management from Command line using apt
  • Configuring Printers Via the CUPS Web Interface
  • My gentoo update guide
  • Switching Keyboard Layout in the Command Line

Linux Command Line Terror! But....Why?

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday.com: One of the strangest mind-benders these days is hearing Linux users going all Barbie and vowing "I will never touch the command line! What is so terrifying about the command line?

Tiny Core Linux -- A Minimal Distro with Big Possibilities

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Tiny Core Linux (TC Linux) takes a minimalist approach to the base system and then lets you add just the pieces you need to get your job done.

GNOME 2.26 big on device, messaging integration

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: Like gum to a shoe, the GNOME Project has stuck to its six monthly release schedule again, issuing version 2.26 of its open source desktop environment.

First Look: GNOME 2.26

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: Ladies and gentlemen, dear geeks... the time has come to announce the release of GNOME 2.26, a light desktop environment used in many popular Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, Mandriva, PCLinuxOS, etc.

How to Learn Linux for Free

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Ah yes, there's that all too familiar sound of tightening budgets and the tossing aside of those things perceived as non-essential. Training's death knell reverberates in my head like the sound of an ill-tuned vesper bell.

Music playing time with Listen

Filed under
Software

everyjoe.com: If you love music then you’re probably looking for the music player of your choice. You could choose among several types of music players out there. Lately I’ve been listening to music on my netbook using Listen.

TomTom Countersues: Linux And Microsoft Going To War

Filed under
Legal

businessinsider.com: This is exactly what we were afraid of. Last month, when Microsoft sued Dutch GPS-maker TomTom on the principle that parts of Linux -- which form the guts of TomTom's device -- violate Microsoft's patents, we hoped for a quick settlement.

just what is the big problem with Linux?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: A bunch of Microsoft Windows users were asked just why don't they use Linux. What's wrong with Linux? What needs to change to entice them? And I'll tell you!

Ubuntu 9.04 Has a Brand New Wallpaper

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: After the new login screen, new themes and the new boot splash theme introduced the other day, Canonical finally updated the old Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) wallpaper with a brand new one.

Also: New wallpapers for Jaunty. Don’t hold your breath.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.
  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot
    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.
  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes
    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.
  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER