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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rugged, wireless-enabled COM runs Linux on AM437x Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 7:28pm
Story Vaio vies with old friend Sony by launching an Android smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 6:36pm
Story KDE President Lydia Pintscher on the Role of a Nonprofit in Open Source Development Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 5:17pm
Story Bash is more powerful than you think Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 11:27am
Story “First” Ultra-HD Android TV STB launches in France Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:26am
Blog entry Catchup Mode Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:19am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:12am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:11am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:10am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:10am

Review: Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro

Filed under
Hardware

raiden.net: The Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro is a Linux powered mini-computer designed to secure your laptop from any and all forms of network and Internet attack.

The Linux Pub Quiz

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: How well do you know your free software people, apps and commands? Put yourself to the test and see just how much you know - we don't think even Linus Torvalds knows all these...

Installing Linux software 101 for Windows users

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: Lately, I've seen several articles by Windows users grumbling about how hard it is to install software on Linux. It is? You could have fooled me. Still, people are having trouble, so here's my 101 class on installing programs on Linux.

23 Useful System Applications for Linux

Filed under
Software

techcityinc.com: It’s always great to have Linux Alternatives to popular applications so I’ve decided to write about some of the most useful System applications for Linux including Cd burners, Aniti Virus, FTP solutions and instant messengers that you can download today.

6 Great Apps to Analyze Your Disk Usage in Linux

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: You may own a one terabyte hard disk, but the screen still shows an “Your disk is full” error message whenever you want to install a new application. Does this sound familiar to you?

Behind the scenes in Microsoft's war against Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: Even as Microsoft has slipped into the mainstream of open source by embedding it in its products and adopting open-source strategies for services such as customer relationship management, it continues its subversive fight against Linux.

Also: About That Microsoft 'Open Source' Job Opening

Preview: Three Trends At Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE)

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: As the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) prepares to kick-off February 20 in Los Angeles, The VAR Guy did some preliminary poking around. He wanted to see if there were any key trends worth noting.

How do you beat free?

Filed under
OS

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Linux activists state that the dropping cost of computers will force Microsoft into a corner and it will be unable to compete with low-cost alternatives on either the MS Office or the MS Windows front. Hardware with a Linux distro is often either more expensive or the same price as hardware with MS Windows. Why is that?

Krita 2.0: a Host of New Features

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: Boudewijn Rempt has summarised results of development for the next version of Krita, the painting and image editing application for KOffice. Krita 2.0 will contain a host of new features, some of which are unique in the free software world. Below Piotr introduces some of the new features which will be available in this release.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 RC3: Entering the "Waiting for Lenny" Phase

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: MEPIS has distributed ISO files for RC3 of SimplyMEPIS 8.0. For RC3, the kernel has been updated to upstream version, 2.6.27.15. Qemu 0.9.1+svn, libvirt 0.6., virt-manager 0.6.1, and virtinst 0.400.1 are available from the MEPIS pool to better match the virtualization configuration of the MEPIS kernel.

What’s new with Lenny

Filed under
Linux

debiantoday.com: Lenny’s long awaited target release date is just around the corner. Many in the Debian community have been using Lenny for some time now as testing but there is a lot of people out there who haven’t upgraded yet. For those getting ready to make the switch and for those who just haven’t really looked in to it, I have decided to list some of the key changes.

Bruce Perens: Combining GPL and Proprietary Software

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Linux is a natural for embedded systems. That's why it's popping up in more cell phones, often without the customer even realizing it's there. But cell phone manufacturers, and the broader sector of embedded systems, must cope with the problem of how to combine the GPL Linux kernel, and software that isn't Open Source. How does one do that legally?

Minimalist Distributions

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: Old computers are less than a dime a dozen—-literally. I pick them up for free. So some local geek like me comes along and turns it into a Linux box. But how far can you push that? How little computer does it take to run a modern, GUI operating system?

The Kindle is a Swindle

Filed under
Hardware

informationweek.com: Amazon's Kindle v2 officially arrived today, and it's a swindle. I have no argument with the item itself, but $400 is a lot of dough to pay for a gadget that will sit gathering dust a couple of weeks after you've purchased it. Amazon customers are already up in arms--and they're right.

Richard Stallman: Up close and impersonal

Filed under
OSS

brucebyfield.wordpress: When Richard Stallman spoke the other night at the Maritime Labour Centre in Vancouver, I wasn’t going to see what he is really like, or to hear his arguments. I went to see his public persona, and to observe how other people reacted to it.

The incredible shrinking operating system

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: Windows, Mac OS, and Linux are all getting smaller. What does that mean for you?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 289

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Preview: Moblin V2 Core Alpha

  • News: From Puppy to Woof, Mandriva Assembly, BSD distros in freeze, Fedora FAQ updates, Slackware package finder, interviews with developers from Xfce and KDE
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 6 "x86_64", StartCom Enterprise Linux 5.0.3
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2009.1 Beta 2, Frugalware Linux 1.0rc1
  • New additions: Ojuba
  • New distributions: PocketPC
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

What can Linux do for you?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: As the Linux name has been filtering down from the dizzying heights of geekdom to the general mind share. I am sure that many people have been wondering exactly what this Linux thing is and what can it do for them.

Awn Window Navigator

Filed under
Software

Is Ubuntu Heading Down the Microsoft Release Path?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: This thought hit home when I was working to fix a sound issue on my computer, although the seeds had been sown quite some time ago with my upgrade to Ubuntu 7.04. My concern is not about FOSS philosophy, but rather about updates and version releases.

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More on Tesla's Compliance

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more