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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell responds to Open Addict's boycott

Filed under
SUSE

"Novell's John Dragoon, Senior VP and CMO, responded today to our original letter calling for a boycott of all Novell products and services. Their response has been posted to our Novell Boycott page."

Ubuntu beats Fedora: Long-term support

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Legacy Project is shutting down. The goal of the Fedora Legacy Project was to provide security and critical bug fix errata packages for Fedora Core distributions in maintenance mode. Fedora users can no longer get support for releases older than Fedora Core 5.

Sweet! Computing is ready to go

Filed under
Web

We've gotten http://sweetcomputing.com to a point where we're ready for visitors. This site is designed to help you find out what can work on your computer...be it an older model or brand spanking new.

No more TUX Mag :(

Filed under
Linux

I am sorry to inform our readers that Issue 20 of TUX was the last produced. While we have received an amazing amount of positive feedback about the magazine, the financial reality of the situation made it impossible for us to continue publishing TUX.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 183

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Statistics: DistroWatch in 2006

  • News: SimplyMEPIS, Fedora and Debian release updates, Ulteo and SabayonLinux interviews, openSUSE repositories, MagDriva
  • Released last week: Fedora Core 6 Live CD, KNOPPIX 5.1
  • Upcoming releases: FreeBSD 6.2, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5
  • Donations: SabayonLinux receives US$450
  • New additions: Thisk Server
  • New distributions: AsteriskNOW, eBox, Linkat GNU/Linux, Ophcrack Live CD, Parted Magic, Slax-LFI, Super Gamer

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Track your swag with GCstar

Filed under
Software

How many times has this happened to you: no sooner are the holidays over than one of your friends begs you to let him borrow the brand new DVD set you just got -- and the next thing you know, it's Labor Day, and your so-called friend swears he wasn't the one who borrowed it? What you need is a collection manager like GCstar so that you don't lose track of your valuables.

What YOU Can Do In 2007 For Open Source

Filed under
OSS

I come to you today with a challenge. A call to action if you will. If you consider yourself a supporter of open source take a look at the applications you use. How many of them are still proprietary? We can talk all day long but until we DO something nothing will change.

Open Source: Key projects turn pro

Filed under
OSS

Throughout 2006, Linux and open source continued their march toward the mainstream of enterprise software. Perhaps no one event exemplified this trend more than Red Hat’s acquisition of JBoss in April. With JBoss’s Java technologies under its wing, Red Hat is no longer merely a Linux vendor; it’s become an open source powerhouse.

Book Review: Moving to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Those that have followed this site for a while know that I occasionally post a book review. There really are a lot of Ubuntu based books hitting the market anymore and many of them really are very good!

Open source, security, talent top list for '06, '07

Filed under
Misc

Security issues, open-source development and a tech talent shortage dominated software industry headlines during 2006 in New England, and the rest of the nation.

Office, OpenOffice Ready To Talk

Filed under
SUSE

Novell plans to release open-source interoperability technology between the OpenOffice.org productivity suite and Microsoft Office 2007.

Virtualization Gets A Grip In 2006

When it comes to Linux servers, a few months can make a whole lot of difference. Earlier this year, Red Hat, Novell, and most major Linux vendors were doing their best to fend off Windows Virtualized Server by getting their own virtualization offerings out the door first. Jacqueline Emigh concludes this three-part series on Linux in 2006.

Also: Letting Go of Windows NT and 2000

Tomorrow's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Local DNS Cache for Faster Browsing on Ubuntu Machine

  • Show and hide the GRUB Menu on Ubuntu
  • installing Xen domU on Debian Etch
  • multiple ethernet devices in Xen
  • Don’t forget CursorShadow
  • How to set up a DNS Server using Bind

New Year 2007 - The year of GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Today is the dawn of a new year, the year 2007. Every year, we wish, hope and dream that it will be the year when GNU/Linux will gain critical mass appeal - not that it has failed to significantly widen its base. One of the most endearing aspect of GNU/Linux for me over and above the ideological considerations is its simplicity.

The gag is off: Samba’s Allison talks turkey on Microsoft-Novell deal

Filed under
SUSE

On December 21, word leaked out that lead Samba developer Jeremy Allison quit Novell in protest over the Microsoft-Novell alliance, unveiled in early November. Allison said he couldn't provide specifics on his decision until some time after December 29. Today is December 30, so the gag order is over. And Allison isn't holding back

Best Games of 2006

Filed under
Gaming

The last 12 months have proved to be among the most eventful in the history of videogames. Lots of videogames proved themselves to be must-have purchases but which ones have been selected by our panel of experts?

Virtual Linux

Filed under
Linux

Virtualization means many things to many people. A big focus of virtualization currently is server virtualization, or the hosting of multiple independent operating systems on a single host computer. This article explores the ideas behind virtualization and then discusses some of the many ways to implement virtualization. We also look at some of the other virtualization technologies out there, such as operating system virtualization on Linux.

Directory Services as the Foundation of Organizational Infrastures

Filed under
Software

If you have followed any of my last six installments about LDAP, then you know we've taken a technical approach to the subject. I wrote the majority of the material in this series as part of an O'Reilly book entitled "Linux System Administration" or simply LSA. I just wanted to make you aware of the possibilities.

Knoppix v5.1.0 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

In time for the new year, Knoppix 5.1.0 has been released. Even with Windows users, Knoppix is an incredibly GNU/Linux LiveCD that offers a great deal of desktop functionality and features.

Linux hard drive benchmark & bottleneck testing software suite for performance

Filed under
HowTos

The stress test of hardware (hard drive benchmarks) is a simplistic test. There are a number of benchmarking applications software that can be used as hard disk (storage) stress testing. My favorite is Bonnie++ software.

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Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more