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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 6:07pm
Story Why I Prefer KDE srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 2:36am
Story Kernel Log - Coming in 3.7 (Part 4): Drivers srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 2:31am
Story 20 Ubuntu Apps For Daily Life srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 2:30am
Story Upstart in Debian srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:18am
Story Fedora Linux 18 beta finally released srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:12am
Story 7 Open Source Questions With Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst srlinuxx 28/11/2012 - 1:10am
Story Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon Review srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:45pm
Story GNOME 3.7.2 Drops Fallback Mode srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:43pm
Story KDE 4.10 Brings Better, Smarter Dolphin srlinuxx 27/11/2012 - 7:40pm

Today's Extra Links:

  • klik2 is coming closer -- check it out Smiling

  • Stock Screenlet
  • Automatix: Initial Conclusions
  • OSCON Wrap up report
  • Ubuntu Users = drooling idiots?

Runes of Avalon - an enjoyable game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

All about Linux: In my teens I was addicted to playing computer games. The most enjoyable ones were games which had simple controls. Two weeks back I had the opportunity to try out another very interesting game called "Runes of Avalon".

Some LinuxWorld predictions

Filed under
Linux

CBR: It's that time of the year again. Here's next week's news, so you won't miss anything: Ron Hovsepian will talk up the benefits of Novell's Microsoft deal, Dell will not announce new Linux PCs but loads of people will blog about them anyway, and IBM will announce something.

Linux, 2.6.23-rc2, "-rc2 is the new -rc1"

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "So I tried to hold people to the merge window," Linus Torvalds began in announcing the 2.6.23-rc2 kernel, "and said no to a few pull requests, but this whole '-rc2 is the new -rc1' thing is a disease, and not only is -rc2 late, it's bigger than it should be. Oh, well."

PCLinuxOS - A little walk down history lane (Updated)

Filed under
PCLOS

Texstar: In the summer of 2003 I became interested in livecd technology after looking at knoppix and a fresh distribution from a fellow named Warren called Mepis. I came across a South African fellow by the name of Jaco Greef who was developing a script called mklivecd and porting it to Mandrake Linux. I got an idea to make a livecd based on Mandrake Linux 9.2 along with all my customizations.

Good Son, Bad Son

Filed under
OS

Linux Today: A couple of weeks ago, my mom got a bee in her bonnet about no longer being able to connect to her favorite web sites, due to the age of her browser and operating system. Her options: get a new Apple machine with OS X or get a new PC and let me get Linux on it for her.

Compiz Core 0.5.2 is out

Filed under
Software

A new compiz release 0.5.2 is now available. Highlights include: Better support for multiple X-screens, Major improvements to option initialization, and Plugin plugins that make it possible to adjust and extend the behavior of existing plugins through new plugins.

People Behind KDE: Summer of Code 2007 (1/4)

Filed under
KDE

The People Behind KDE series takes a temporary break, as we talk to students who are working on KDE as part of the Google Summer of Code 2007 - in the first of four interview articles, meet Aleix Pol Gonzàlez, Piyush Verma, Mike Arthur and Nick Shaforostoff!

Firefox 3 alpha 7 released

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks: As expected, a seventh alpha version of Firefox 3 has been released and while it brings some visible changes, most of the improvements are still happening in the background, just like in previous alphas. Let's start.

Are Linus Torvalds, IBM, AMD, others at odds over pushing hardware drivers out of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet blogs: I can’t possibly profess to know what the pros and cons are of pushing hardware device drivers into the hypervisors that support virtualization technologies like those from XEN and VMware. But it’s clear from a recent thread over at the Linux Foundation that there’s some disagreement amongst experts (including Linus Torvalds himself) as to whether it makes sense or not.

Recover Your WordPress Password

Filed under
HowTos

watchingthenet: If you manage a Blog on Wordpress than I'm sure there have been a few times you attempted to log on, only to completely blank out and forget your password. Or maybe you just changed your password and never wrote it down or saved it.

Windows vs Ubuntu - why switch?

Filed under
OS

TALL blog: I want to re-install my work PC - get rid of Windows and install Ubuntu. Here’s why…

"Open source business model" takes on a new meaning with the Open Business Foundation

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: The Open Business Foundation (OBF) operates on two premises: that the open source development community makes good business sense, and that small businesses can be more successful if they band together with each other to share resources of all kinds.

Linux: Reliability, Availability. and Serviceability

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A recent patch posted to the lkml aimed to make it possible to use both kdb and kdump at the same time, and instead led to an interesting discussion about RAS (Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability) tools.

Unforked Ghostscript released, now under the GPL, and works with CUPS

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: This week Ghostscript, an open source postscript processor, released version 8.6.0. Ghostscript releases are not normally newsworthy since they are frequent and incremental, but this release is special.

What do you want to hear from Dell about its Linux plans?

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: In an unusual move, Dell is asking its users what they want Dell CTO Kevin Kettler to talk about at next week's LinuxWorld trade show at San Francisco's Moscone Center.

Securely Delete Files in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

MaximumPC: It used to be that only paranoids cared a whit about shredding their data—or their office paperwork, for that matter. But these days, there really are people out there just waiting for you to slip up and expose your private data. Fortunately, if you're running Linux, deleting sensitive information is fast and easy with the 'shred' utility.

Collaborating with Mindquarry

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If there's one thing the world doesn't lack for, besides bad movie sequels and dishonest politicians, it's collaboration software. Good collaboration software that's open source, on the other hand, is a rare thing indeed.

KDE Quickies: Awards to Enter, Magnatune Hires Amarok Developer, and an Old Interview

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: A few quickies again this week: the 4th Trophées du Libre (International Free Software Awards) contest is open. Also new this week: Nikolaj Hald Nielsen has announced that he is being hired full time to work on Amarok, courtesy of the Magnatune music store.

SimplyMEPIS 7.0 Prebeta - A First Look

Filed under
Linux

shift+backspace: Yesterday, the first release pre-release version of MEPISSimplyMEPIS 7.0 was announced. This release marks the end of a great Ubuntu-based distribution, but the beginning of a spectacular distribution based on Debian.

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Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

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    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
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Red Hat Financial News

Wine 2.0 RC6 released