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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 4.0 SSD EXT4 / Btrfs / XFS / F2FS Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 6:22pm
Blog entry Blog posts Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 5:45pm
Story After The Next OTA Update, Ubuntu Touch Will Switch To Ubuntu 15.04 Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 5:06pm
Story The rebirth of Free Software Magazine Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 4:52pm
Story Welcome to Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5-TEST-2 Release Notes Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 4:48pm
Story elementary OS 0.3 at Softpedia Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 4:44pm
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 1 12/04/2015 - 10:47am
Story Semplice 7 review Rianne Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 7:35am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 10:35pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 10:34pm

ATI Linux Drivers Gain Support For Unreleased RS880

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: AMD's current flagship offering when it comes to integrated ATI graphics is the Radeon HD 3300 / 790GX. As something new for consumers to consider, soon it looks like AMD will be introducing the RS880.

Arduino hardware hacking: Part 1

Filed under
Hardware

tuxradar.com: Arduino is cool. It's cool because it's a tiny device - about three inches by two inches - that comes with a USB port and a programmable chip. It's cool because you can program it using a very simple programming language known as Wiring.

THREE reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3

Filed under
OOo

collinpark.blogspot: OK, here are three reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3 if you're still using 2.x

Six Latest Firefox Addons You Should Check Out

Filed under
Moz/FF

killertechtips.com: We all love Firefox for the sheer number of extensions that can be added to it. There are plenty of brilliant yet unpopular extensions that have been written about before.

Move over Tux; it's time for Tuz the Tassie Devil

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Ever socially aware, Linux has a new mascot for a short while. Tuz will instead embrace the boot screen of many a distro in kernel 2.6.29.

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Review - OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
Reviews

I decided to install OpenSUSE this weekend onto my new Maxtor 4 USB hard drive. I've used the live CD before with KDE 4.1, but didn't like not having the option to have different backgrounds on the multiple desktops. Supposedly, this option and others will be available in KDE 4.2. So, instead of waiting, I decided to install KDE 3.5.10. Here's how it went.....

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Arch Linux Review

  • A PCLinuxOS 2009.1 userbar
  • SAM-Linux, PCLinuxOS' Ugly Duckling?
  • pwn2own confusion
  • Installing Linux on my girfriend’s laptop: an overview
  • Digest of Enlightenment 17 Dimensions
  • FLOSS Weekly 61: Arduino
  • Linux
  • A Working X Input 2 Implementation
  • Programming for Kids with Basic-256 on Ubuntu
  • why I chose openSuSE again and howto make updates faster

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Easily Get free newsgroup access over ipv6 in Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu: Picviz 0.5 Installation
  • How To Configure PXE Boot on CentOS 5
  • How to set up a web server with Apache
  • TV-Browser - A Digital TV Guide in openSUSE
  • Fixing High Latency with KDE4 - Display Flickering - Freezing Videos
  • Get system specs in Linux
  • Domainkeys/Dkim with Postfix (quick way)
  • Mplayer on Gentoo with VDPAU
  • Configure BIND 9 For IPv4 (or IPv6) Only

2009 and still in fear of using new hardware in GNU/Linux!

Filed under
Linux

When the GNU/Linux revolution started reaching the masses, around 2000, I predicted that by 2010 there would be full vendor support for the free operating system. Well, it’s 2009, and I have to admit it — I am feeling nervous. Read the full article at Freesoftware Magazine.

Get prepared for the inevitable with automated backups

Filed under
Linux

No excuses: do-it-yourself, secure, distributed network backups made easy

My Distro Is Better Than Yours…. Not!

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I read a lot of news feeds. Sometimes too many. I admit it. About 10% of what I read is new. The most tiresome ones have to be the my-distro-is-better-than-yours. Only slightly less tiresome are the Linux vs. Windows ones.

Fedora 10 goes Minstrel, wifi users rejoice

Filed under
Software

izanbardprince.wordpress: If you’re getting erratic wifi performance in your favorite Linux distribution, no it is not just you, the old algorithm was actually quite bad. Enter Minstrel.

Distro Review: Debian Lenny

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Ok it’s time for another distro review and I’m a bit overdue with this one but I’m a big fan of Debian and when I reviewed Etch (4.0) last year I declared that if I were to finally grow up and settle down with just one distro this would be the one.

RMS "Broke into Microsoft and Stole Software"...

opendotdotdot.blogspot: ...that, at least, is what this deranged story in the Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper claims.

Linux Netbooks - Cheap is good

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: The Linux Netbooks are cheap, simple and small — just apt for performing the basic tasks. The future for this next wave of personal technology gadgets is simple as it doesn’t burn a hole in your pocket and has portability advantages.

More on the Ubuntu Jaunty Notifications Crapfest

Filed under
Ubuntu

izanbardprince.wordpress: I mentioned earlier that I had some objections to this new “Indicator” crapplet in Ubuntu Jaunty, I view it as a kind of foistware that has nothing to do with the system.

Why Linux is Better

Filed under
Linux

scienceblogs.com/gregladen: Why is Linux the coolest erector set in the world, that you should be willing to pay for? In part because Linux lacks the kind of freaky design oddities that arise when the makers of the software must go to meetings with a marketing department.

Detox your Linux box!

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: We like to install things. Lots of things. The net effect on the average Linux installation is that things will eventually start to break. It might not be in the first six months, or even the first year, but there will be a point when things start to fail.

Writer's Tools extension for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linuxbeacon.com: Writer’s Tools is a set of utilities designed to help OpenOffice.org users perform a wide range of tasks. Using Writer’s Tools, you can back up documents, look up and translate words and phrases, manage text snippets, and keep tabs on document statistics.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more