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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/03/2015 - 10:04am
Story Fedora 22 Alpha Released And Available To Download Mohd Sohail 12/03/2015 - 3:49am
Story Zynq-based SBC runs Linux, offers FPGA-based I/O Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 8:13pm
Story Life-support, Community and Thunderbird Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 8:02pm
Story Evolve OS Is a Clean and Light Work in Progress Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 7:56pm
Story Fedora 22 Alpha, Bodhi 3.0 Review, & Ubuntu 15.04 Wallpapers Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 6:08pm
Story Sitara AM437x dev kit targets Linux-based industrial apps Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 6:02pm
Story Virginia Tech's Linux Laptop Orchestra puts a new twist on orchestral music Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 2:40pm
Story A Developer’s Eye View of Bodhi 3.0.0 Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 2:31pm
Story On the Linux Kernel’s Code of Conflict Roy Schestowitz 11/03/2015 - 2:24pm

Compiz community shakeup could bring big improvements

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The development community behind the open source Compiz window manager is undergoing a major reorganization effort that will converge disparate branches of the project and help it overcome its recent lack of direction.

Debian Project seeks Hardware Donations

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxelectrons.com: The Debian project is looking for sponsors for two new official services: snapshot and data archives. Both services utilize large amounts of data and therefore require a capable machine with a large disk array that provides 10 TB of disk space to start, with the ability to be easily extended. We'd like interested sponsors to contact hardware-donations@debian.org.

AMD Shanghai Opteron: Linux vs. OpenSolaris Benchmarks

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: In January we published a review of the AMD Shanghai Opteron CPUs on Linux when we looked at four of the Opteron 2384 models. The performance of these 45nm quad-core workstation/server processors were great when compared to the earlier AMD Barcelona processors on Ubuntu Linux, but how is their performance when running Sun's OpenSolaris operating system?

KDE 4.2 Progress Report

Filed under
KDE

benkevan.com/blog: Well, I’ve been a few days with KDE 4.2 and thought I’d give a little insight of my experience and why I made the decision to go back to KDE 3.5.10.

OLPC no longer wants to change the world

Filed under
OLPC

itwire.com: There is more disquieting news emerging from the One Laptop per Child project - or what remains of it, following the sackings and budget cuts in January.

Updating Software under Linux: Strikes 5 and 6

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Many reader comments to my prior posting, Updating software in Linux: four strikes and you're out, raised interesting points that I'll address here. But in reading and responding to them, I came across two more gripes about updating software in Linux.

My wife gave up on KDE! :-(

Filed under
KDE

qashapp.blogspot: I really tried. At first I went ok. She complained about the system being way slower, but she could live with it. But over time more and more has just been to disturbing and now, after 3 months of KDE, I chose to reinstall her machine with Mac OS. I have myself over that period grown a bit less Kubuntu/KDE friendly.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #128

Filed under
Ubuntu

fridge.ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #128 for the week of February 1st- February 7th, 2009 is now available. In this Issue: Ubunt Jaunty Alpha 4 released, Rock the Docs: Ubuntu LoCo Docs Day, and Hall of Fame interview: Christophe Sauthier.

KDE 4.2 Review

Filed under
KDE

linux-ninja.com: I recently did a bunch of package unmasking in my desktop Gentoo installation and did an emerge of KDE 4 .2 and I thought I would share my experiences in my shiny new desktop environment.

Average John & the Ubuntu Switch

Filed under
Ubuntu

johnbooth.typepad: So, the Booth Ubuntu Linux switchover is complete, though not completely spit-shined yet, but ... dude. This is freaking AWESOME and the overall experience has been way easier and smoother than I had anticipated.

Free software isn't freeware: why Linux and FOSS have a higher standard

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: Microsoft's recent survey proclaimed nearly half the population believe it is ok to use pirated software for personal use. This diminishes the argument by Linux advocates that you can use their operating system without any cost. Yet, you can't confuse free as in cost with free as in freedom. Here's what FOSS really means.

The Unthinkable: Moving From Ubuntu to Debian 5 Lenny

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: I am thinking the unthinkable…..I am considering changing from Ubuntu 8.10 for my desktop to Debian 5. I have been running the Debian 5 Lenny candidate for awhile and have bee very pleased with the stability and features. It actually functions and acts more like the distribution I need and work on than Ubuntu.

Linux is a mixture, windows is a compound

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: The differences between Linux and windows are chalk and cheese in respect to how the two operating systems are put together. While the end result of putting together these operating systems are pretty much the same functionality. It is the way they are put together.

Ubuntu Codenames

Filed under
Ubuntu

pthree.org: With the release of Ubuntu 9.04 about 2 months out, Mark Shuttleworth will be announcing the codename of Ubuntu 9.10 fairly soon. Quit calling the releases after their codenames.

Virtualization With Xen On Debian Lenny (AMD64)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on a Debian Lenny (5.0) system (AMD64). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • What I do for Wesnoth

  • Tweaking Ubuntu
  • Saving is the open source mandate
  • maddog's Brazilian Multimedia Challenge and a YouTube Video
  • A few things to do immediatley after installing Ubuntu 8.10
  • Open source integration tools are 'enterprise ready'
  • Reputation Vs. Technical Merits
  • FLOSS Weekly 55: jQuery
  • Ubuntu Server on Amazon - Beta programme now open
  • Truth in Advertising
  • Linksys WRT54G v5 DD-WRT Firmware Flash
  • Learning Linux Through Humor And Comics

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Securing Apache From Spiders and Flies

  • Change Keymap in Gentoo Linux
  • How to Generate Barcode in OpenOffice.org
  • Conky
  • Set Up a Free Business Server With Ubuntu
  • Speed up your system by avoiding the swap file
  • Digiband - Drumming & Guitar simulator in openSUSE
  • Try out the Metacity compositor
  • floating point exception - gentoo
  • vnstat - a console-based network traffic monitor
  • Flash crashes/hangs Firefox when switching to fullscreen
  • A softer --as-needed
  • How to creat zip files on Linux compatible with Windows
  • How to set wallpaper in Fluxbox with Nitrogen

Updating software in Linux: four strikes and you're out

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: A while back I was considering installing Linux on a computer and using the free VMware server to run other operating systems on the machine. But VMware's instructions to install their software were written by Linux techies for Linux techies and I couldn't understand them.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more