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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 214

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: GParted LiveCD vs Parted Magic

  • Statistics: DistroWatch in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • News: MEPIS returns to Debian roots, Ubuntu dismisses Automatix, Carmony leaves Linspire, Medison Celebrity offers low-cost notebook with Fedora, Murdock explains future of Solaris
  • Released last week: Arch Linux 2007.08, Puppy Linux 2.17.1
  • Upcoming releases: Asianux 3.0, Foresight Linux 2.0
  • Donations: FreeNAS receives US$350
  • New additions: Webconverger
  • New distributions: CPX mini, FreevoLive, JUXlala, Klikit-Linux, OSWA-Assistant
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

BLACK HAT - Mozilla says it can patch flaws in 10 days

Filed under
Moz/FF

LinuxWorld: A Mozilla Corp. executive has vowed that his company can patch any critical vulnerability in its software within 10 days, a sign that Mozilla may intend to step up its efforts to improve security.

Why Microsoft Is Going Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft

LinuxJournal: No one would have believed me if I had said five years ago that Microsoft would have a page on its Web site called “Open Source at Microsoft.” That's right: Microsoft has released not one but several pieces of code as open source. Moreover, it's submitting some of its home-grown licences to the Open Source Initiative for approval. So what is going on here?

Also: Microsoft Would Love to Hate Open Source

Nvidia Linux driver 100.14.11 and Linux kernel 2.6.23

Filed under
Reviews
HowTos

Well, they're not working together. Unless you're not willing to tweak it a little bit. So, out of the box, you won't be able to test brand new Linux CFS scheduler. Fortunately, the driver needs only few simple fixes to compile properly.

Linspire CEO Kevin Carmony resigns

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch: In an interview today with Linux-Watch, controversial Linux leader Kevin Carmony confirmed rumors that he had resigned as CEO of desktop Linux vendor Linspire on July 31.

Graphics pros will find good tools in compact Grafpup distro

Filed under
Reviews

linux.com: Grafpup 2.0 is a compact Linux distribution based on Puppy Linux and aimed at graphics professionals. It offers a variety of options for installation, a custom set of configuration utilities, and a niche suite of applications for digital artists.

GIMP Animation Package 2.2.2 Released

Filed under
GIMP

Version 2.2.2 of gimp-gap, the GIMP Animation Package, is now available. This release fixes some bugs, updates translations and prepares gimp-gap for the update to GIMP 2.4.

Telco Dumps Red Hat For Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

LinuxWorld: Providing location information to thousands of mobile phone users is all in a day's work for Ubuntu Linux, which has replaced popular enterprise distribution Red Hat for Locatrix Communications' mission-critical workloads.

Run a Linux server farm for nix

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: One great thing about Linux is its rock-solid nature even when you load it up with as many daemons and services as you like. Yet, often “best practice” dictates you separate out some apps across a couple of servers or at the very least provide a safe development environment which is distinct from your production environment.

It's a LinuxWorld. Or Is It?

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Instead of having nothing but Linux, the keynote lineup will also have a few speakers who are apparently going to be talking about more than just Linux. That is if they talk about Linux at all.

Road Warrior: Switching from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

whattheythink.com: Occasionally I have written about how Linux has become a viable alternative operating system for the desktop. While you can get some excellent versions of Linux that are completely free, such as the very popular Ubuntu (on my notebook), you may be better off paying for some of the other versions.

Idea: Unify the Ubuntu name

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Open Source Advocate: Everyone agrees that Ubuntu is making huge progress towards mainstream adoption. But what do we mean when we say "Ubuntu"? Don't we really mean *buntu, a collection of all Ubuntu versions? How do we explain this to the mainstream user?

"Fake Steve Jobs" is Daniel Lyons, in case anyone wants to sue

Filed under
Misc

groklaw: The New York Times has the news that Fake Steve Jobs, the anonymous blogger pretending to be Apple's Steve Jobs, is actually Daniel Lyons of Forbes. Why am I not surprised?

Red Hat to offer whitebox Linux desktops globally

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: The world's largest Linux vendor Red Hat will release a pre-installed desktop version of Linux globally in September. The new Red Hat desktop targeting primarily small business users will be available on cheap whitebox Intel PCs and, according to Red Hat, will not try to be a Windows clone.

Linux Gamers’ Game List

Filed under
Gaming

FOSSwire: Finding good Linux games, whether they’re community built or commercial offerings, isn’t always that easy and that’s why icclus.org maintain a Linux Gamers’ Game List. It has 371 games

Linux 2.6.23-rc2 Kernel Performance

phoronix: While the Linux 2.6.23 kernel is only weeks into development, it's already generated quite a bit of attention. With all of this activity surrounding the Linux 2.6.23 kernel we've decided to conduct a handful of benchmarks comparing the Linux 2.6.20, 2.6.21, 2.6.22, and 2.6.23 kernel releases so far.

SlackRoll is ready

Filed under
Software

503 Service Unavailable: It’s been a couple of months since I initially published the first version of SlackRoll, my particular upgrade manager for Slackware. It’s about to be tagged stable in both SourceForge.net and freshmeat.net. Now that Slackware 12.0 is out, and people will have a real oportunity of realizing how much time SlackRoll can save you.

In "Drivers -- below the OS?", Linus Torvalds said more than ZDNet has noticed

Filed under
Linux

beranger: Are Linus Torvalds, IBM, AMD, others at odds over pushing hardware drivers out of Linux? pointed to an intriguing discussion thread: [Desktop_architects] Drivers -- below the OS?, but David Berlind failed to notice that the "Strong words from Linus regarding the virtualization community!" were actually saying more.

n/a

Environmentally friendly PC runs on 15 watts of power

Filed under
Gentoo

wilmingtonstar.com: entil, with the help of his partner, investor, chairman and fellow Frenchman Alain Rossmann, has developed a low-cost, hassle-free, environmentally-correct PC. The Zonbox uses the Gentoo version of Linux as the core of its operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.