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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.18-rc1 Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:45am
Story Firefox Hello Not Working and Mozilla Claims the Bug is Invalid Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:40am
Story Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" Arrives in a Few Days Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 8:09pm
Story Meizu MX4 Pro Spotter Running Ubuntu Touch Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 7:20pm
Story KDE Telepathy 0.9.0 Released Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Porteus 3.1 RC1 Is a Bleeding Edge Slackaware-Based Distro with Linux Kernel 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 6:05pm
Story Five Best Linux Desktop Environments Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:57pm
Story IBM Tweaks Power-Linux Discount Deal In Europe Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:56pm
Story Parsix OS Is an Interesting GNOME and Debian 7.0 "Whezzy" Blend Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Free Software is Europe’s second chance Rianne Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 5:51pm

Why Linux won the popularity contest and FreeBSD didn’t

Filed under
Linux

hitechsquad.com: There are several fully functional and stable Open Source operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, OpenSolaris, NetBSD, OpenBSD and so on. So the question is why has Linux won the popularity contest?

If You Knew Cash Like GnuCash Knows Cash

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: One of the final frontiers for users, and open source programmers, is the dark realm of the financial application. GnuCash fills the void of a financial package for Linux users but GnuCash, contrary to what some believe, will not replace Quickbooks although it does have some very advanced features.

Display your geolocation data with Viking

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Viking is an open source application that allows you to import and edit your Global Positioning System (GPS) points of interest and tracks. It can overlay the points and tracks on your choice of Google Maps, Terraserver, OpenStreetMap, or NASA's BlueMarble map tiles so you can see what you are doing.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Available Now

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: Inside is an Intel Atom Diamondville processor and it has a 1024x600 LED-backlit screen with 4, 8 and 16GB SSD options and about three hours of battery life. Only the Windows XP version is available now for $399, in black or white—the $349 Ubuntu flavor, along with the rest of the six-color rainbow are a few weeks away.

Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux Tops 8 Million Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Sure, Windows is expected to run on 1 billion devices by 2010. But a loud minority is making its voice heard by moving to Ubuntu Linux. In fact, Canonical’s marketing materials state that Ubuntu now has more than 8 million users.

Chrome being polished for Mac and Linux

Filed under
Google

pcpro.co.uk: Google has revealed that it is "actively working" on bringing its Chrome browser to Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. Writing on its Mac development blog, the company claims that Mac and Linux engineers joined the team early in the process.

ZaReason (and Other Independents) Outshine the Big Boys

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blog.linuxtoday: Dell, ASUS, Acer, and all the other bandwagoning coattail riders are getting all the headlines for selling desktop Linux preinstalls, especially on this new netbook wave. But let's not forget that these bandwagoning coattail-riding party-crashers are very late to the party.

Amazon to Sell OLPC XO Laptops From November

Filed under
OLPC

pcworld.com: Amazon.com will start selling One Laptop Per Child's low-cost XO notebook computer as part of the Give One, Get One program OLPC developed last year, according to an official from OLPC.

Also: Sugar openSUSE live

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fotowall - Make Wallpaper Collages from your Photos

  • "Olympics" phone runs Linux
  • Free but not easy: A guide to open-source compliance
  • Linux has come of age
  • The 411 on KDE 4.1.1 for openSUSE
  • X Server 1.5.0 Is Now Released!
  • Evergreen takes root at Kent County Public Library
  • New Suit Puts Hans Reiser’s Company in Play
  • Online desktop or desktop online?
  • openSUSE Board and Elections, part 2
  • Led Zeppelin using Drupal
  • Fresh Fluxbox 1.1.0 Has Arrived
  • Red Hat Q and A: MRG (Messaging, Real-time, and Grid)
  • One enterprise's view on open source
  • Open Source Repository: Public Launch of the European Open Source Repository
  • Interview: Brad Linder (Liliputing) Talks Linux and Ultraportable Computers
  • Sorting Perl Lists And Removing Duplicates On Linux Or Unix
  • Novell unifies identity and security management

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to change message of the day (MOTD) in Ubuntu server

  • Sharing files with wdfs and FUSE
  • Commands you might have missed: apropos
  • Using Bash to Best Effect in Ubuntu
  • A Linux users' guide to Google Chrome
  • using awk to remove orphans
  • How To Disable On-Demand CPU Scaling on Linux
  • Keep an eye on your system logs with phpLogCon
  • Marching Penguins: Monitoring Your HPC Cluster
  • Ubuntu, Rails, Apache, Passenger, Capistrano & You

Dell's Ubuntu-powered mini-laptop arrives tomorrow

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Sources tell me, OK friends actually, that tomorrow, September 4th, is the long-awaited day that Dell will announce the release of its Inspiron 910 mini-laptop. It will come with your choice of (Boo!) Windows XP Home SP3 or (Yea!) Ubuntu 8.04.

Open-source lab for local, state governments debuts in N.Y.

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com: If you want local and state government officials to take a serious look at open-source software, then take the open-source software to those government officials.

The Linux Party

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: The November election brings with it the promise of changes, new beginnings, and hope for those who've endured the past 8 years with less than an enthusiastic attitude. The choice of President and Vice President means far less to most of us than the people they choose for Cabinet positions.

GNOME Debian Package Finder: Rough and ready package search for the desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you do your Debian package management from the command line, you are probably aware of utilities that search the cache of available programs, such as apt-cache, apt-file, and dpkg. Possibly, too, you have cursed the limited search information available in graphical interfaces like Synaptic. Now, the GNOME Debian Package Finder (gpfind) brings much of the command-line search capacity to the desktop.

Chromium - Open Source Chrome

Filed under
Google
  • The other Chrome: Chromium

  • Chromium - Open Source Chrome
  • Chromium Linux Build Instructions?

Hardware Review: Elonex Webbook with Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I haven't done many distro reviews lately I know, things have been busy but I do have a new review for you which I hope you'll find interesting. Today's victim *ahem* I mean subject is the Elonex Webbook from Carphone Warehouse with Ubuntu Hardy pre-installed.

simple arch review

Filed under
Linux

42gems.com: I once thought that Debian, with its rock solid stability and simple package management, was the answer to my distro-hopping madness, and that no other distro could fit my needs as well. But Arch Linux has managed to surprise me, satisfying my needs in ways Debian never could.

Trying out LXDE

Filed under
Software

newlinuxuser.com: This is my first time to try out LXDE. I am curious about it and there are certain things that I am glad are in LXDE.

Linux Gazette September 2008 (#154)

Filed under
Linux

In this issue: Hacking a Canon A720IS digital camera with CHDK on GNU/Linux, Book Review: Blown to Bits, WPA Supplicant LEAP, Software Review: uvhd - file investigation utility, and more.I

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.