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Thursday, 14 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fedora NA - Regional Ambassadors

Filed under
Linux

fedoratutorials.com: One of the things I’ve been working pretty heavily on the past couple weeks is getting more involved in the Fedora Ambassador program. And let’s just say its been a blast. I love the new direction of the North American Ambassador program and am excited to be a part of the newly rejuvenated program.

Further Foxconn fun

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

mjg59.livejournal: Ryan kindly sent me a copy of the ACPI tables for his motherboard, so I've had the opportunity to look at them in a little more detail. There's nothing especially surprising. The first method of interest is OSFL.

Dont Preach Linux. Just Mention it

Filed under
Linux

dogbuntu.wordpress: A lot of Linux users especially the ones who are newly finding their feet and have become recent converts of Linux get far too enthusiastic about the joys and benefits they experience after they have converted to Linux. They get excited and try to convert as many people as possible to their favourite OS. These people just get far too excited and end up trying to force people to Linux.

Living with Linux - Stories of a User

Filed under
Linux

silivrenion.com: I've had Fedora linux for a while now. I've enjoyed all of it for the longest time. I wasn't always, I was a Windows user. I am by no means a linux expert, but I am somewhat confident with my PC skills. Either way, the switch to linux that I made was hard, but has paid off in so many ways now.

Ubuntu Linux is Much Better than Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

deepbluespaces.blogspot: I have worked with Ubuntu Linux for about 2 months and find that Ubuntu is much better than Windows. My computer is Thinkpad T43 laptop. The reasons that Ubuntu is better are:

Mojave, strength of the Bear, speed of the Puma?

Filed under
Microsoft

bushweed.blogspot: So, Microsoft decided to pull some publicity about Vista by inventing a name, and showcasing it under that name. This is what they did:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Find BASH Shell Array Length

  • Setting up mpd locally
  • Keyboard Shortcut Keys in Ubuntu
  • Gmrun - Substitute for gnome run dialog in Ubuntu
  • VirtualBox Wireless Bridging
  • Getting VirtualBox working on Ubuntu after a kernel upgrade
  • Automated scanning with the shell
  • Automatically mount a windows share at boot time in OpenSuse 11
  • Taking Screenshots in Gnome
  • HOWTO: PCLOS custom session
  • Customize Compiz Fusion effects In Ubuntu
  • Compiz Fusion in openSUSE 11.0

PCLOS 2007.1 Soon, Followed by PCLOS 2008

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Good news to Linux Desktop Users! Tex and Ripper Gang will be offer PCLinuxOS 2007.1 soon followed by PCLinuxOS 2008. Now no more downloading of more than 400MB software after installing PCLinuxOS 2007.

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated with support for newer hardware

Filed under
Linux

debian-administration.org: The Debian project is pleased to announce the fourth update of its stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (codename etch). In addition to correcting several security problems and a few serious defects in the stable release, for the first time in Debian's history an update for a stable distribution also adds support for newer hardware by giving users the option to install newer drivers.

Face off part two: Windows vs Linux real world RAM and disk tests

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: Last week I put Windows Vista Ultimate and Fedora Linux 9 to a test. The article hit the front page of Digg but received a lot of criticism by those disappointed with the performance of Internet Explorer. So, let's dig deeper and use Firefox to see if Internet Explorer's memory footprint is actually a Windows Vista "feature" or not.

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota and upload/download bandwidth limits with this setup. Passwords will be stored encrypted as MD5 strings in the database.

Promoting Linux using reverse psychology

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: I am not sure what Promoting Linux is all about but everything was so exaggerated I ended up laughing! Let me share some stuff that made me laugh:

Customer demand adds Linux to industrial computer line

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Glacier Computer is offering two Linux distributions as options on its Everest PCs. The company announced this month it is offering customers a choice of IGEL Linux or Fedora Linux distributions.

Switched to Mandriva…

Filed under
MDV

fred.dao2.com: I finally did it! Been talking about ditching Ubuntu for ages and never found the time (you know… backup, new install, restore, get familiar, etc.).

IRC Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: Since I'm an IRC addict and I always liked to spend time learning new stuff on IRC, here is a review of several IRC clients for Linux. Some of them are well-known and popular, like XChat, Konversation or Irssi, and others are not so widely used or known, but nevertheless, they deserve mentioning.

The Most Interesting README File Ever?

Filed under
Linux
Humor

fsckin.com: Another linux zealot at my old job gave me the heads up on this, it’s directly from gnome-cups-manager, and I thought you would all enjoy it. The only question is what illicit substances were not consumed during the writing of this file.

Linux Community: Are we really helping it grow?

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: It is a matter of fact that you’ll find more articles on Linux HOW-TO’s than for any other operating system! Have you tried to figure out the reason behind this?

today's leftovers and late entries

Filed under
News
  • Mandriva working with Emtec to create innovative Gdium computers

  • Free Software and ‘Politics’
  • Sunday Unix/Linux Jokes - A Fair Match
  • linux version of boxee is available
  • Review of "Nmap Network Scanning"
  • Python Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
  • Linux Mint 5.0 Light Review

Atheros Releases 802.11n Linux Driver

Filed under
Hardware
  • Atheros Releases 802.11n Linux Driver

  • ath9k - Atheros unveils free Linux driver for its 802.11n devices
  • Not sure what to buy for Wireless? Buy Atheros

Apple CEO Jobs' life not in danger

Filed under
Mac
  • Apple CEO Jobs' life not in danger: report

  • Steve Jobs is healthy
  • Putting the Sneer Before the Scoop: Joe Nocera and Steve Jobs
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More in Tux Machines

Australian Securities Exchange completes Red Hat migration

The Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) has completed the migration of "mission-critical" legacy applications to the Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). ASX first deployed JBoss EAP in 2011 to modernise its legacy technologies and to facilitate the introduction of new web applications after it realised its legacy application server platform was becoming increasingly inconsistent, unstable, and expensive. After the initial ASX Online Company migration was complete in 2012, ASX used JBoss EAP to build the ASX.com API, as well as its Sharemarket Game, which gives players the opportunity to learn how the share market works. Read more

Programming/Development: GAPID 1.0 and Atom 1.23

  • Diagnose and understand your app's GPU behavior with GAPID
  • GAPID 1.0 Released As Google's Cross-Platform Vulkan Debugger
    Back in March we wrote about GAPID as a new Google-developed Vulkan debugger in its early stages. Fast forward to today, GAPID 1.0 has been released for debugging Vulkan apps/games on Linux/Windows/Android as well as OpenGL ES on Android. GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and allows for analyzing rendering and performance issues with ease using its GUI interface. GAPID also allows for easily experimenting with code changes to see their rendering impact and allows for offline debugging. GAPID has its own format and capturetrace utility for capturing traces of Vulkan (or GLES on Android too) programs for replaying later on with GAPID.
  • Hackable Text Editor Atom 1.23 Adds Better Compatibility for External Git Tools
    GitHub released Atom 1.23, the monthly update of the open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor application loved by numerous developers all over the world. Including a month's worth of enhancements, Atom 1.23 comes with the ability for packages to register URI handler functions, which can be invoked whenever the user visits a URI that starts with "atom://package-name/," and a new option to hide certain commands in the command palette when registering them via "atom.commands.add." Atom 1.23 also improves the compatibility with external Git tools, as well as the performance of the editor by modifying the behavior of several APIs to no longer make callbacks more than once in a text buffer transaction. Along with Atom 1.23, GitHub also released Teletype 0.4.0, a tool that allows developers to collaborate simultaneously on multiple files.

Red Hat GNU/Linux and More

Security: VLC Bug Bounty, Avast Tools, Intel ME

  • European Commission Kicks Off Open-Source Bug Bounty
    The European Commission has announced its first-ever bug bounty program, and is calling on hackers to find vulnerabilities in VLC, a popular open-source multimedia player loaded on every workstation at the Commission. The program has kicked off with a three-week, invitation-only session, after which it will be open to the public. Rewards include a minimum of $2,000 for critical severity bugs, especially remote code execution. High severity bugs such as code execution without user intervention, will start at $750. Medium severity bugs will start at a minimum of $300; these include code execution with user intervention, high-impact crashes and infinite loops. Low-severity bugs, like information leaks, crashes and the like, will pay out starting at $100.
  • Avast launches open-source decompiler for machine code
    Keeping up with the latest malware and virus threats is a daunting task, even for industry professionals. Any device connected to the Internet is a target for being infected and abused. In order to stop attacks from happening, there needs to be an understanding of how they work so that a prevention method can be developed. To help with the reverse engineering of malware, Avast has released an open-source version of its machine-code decompiler, RetDec, that has been under development for over seven years. RetDec supports a variety of architectures aside from those used on traditional desktops including ARM, PIC32, PowerPC and MIPS.
  • Avast makes 'RetDec' machine-code decompiler open source on GitHub
    Today, popular anti-virus and security company, Avast, announces that it too is contributing to the open source community. You see, it is releasing the code for its machine-code decompiler on GitHub. Called "RetDec," the decompiler had been under development since 2011, originally by AVG -- a company Avast bought in 2016.
  • The Intel ME vulnerabilities are a big deal for some people, harmless for most
    (Note: all discussion here is based on publicly disclosed information, and I am not speaking on behalf of my employers) I wrote about the potential impact of the most recent Intel ME vulnerabilities a couple of weeks ago. The details of the vulnerability were released last week, and it's not absolutely the worst case scenario but it's still pretty bad. The short version is that one of the (signed) pieces of early bringup code for the ME reads an unsigned file from flash and parses it. Providing a malformed file could result in a buffer overflow, and a moderately complicated exploit chain could be built that allowed the ME's exploit mitigation features to be bypassed, resulting in arbitrary code execution on the ME. Getting this file into flash in the first place is the difficult bit. The ME region shouldn't be writable at OS runtime, so the most practical way for an attacker to achieve this is to physically disassemble the machine and directly reprogram it. The AMT management interface may provide a vector for a remote attacker to achieve this - for this to be possible, AMT must be enabled and provisioned and the attacker must have valid credentials[1]. Most systems don't have provisioned AMT, so most users don't have to worry about this.