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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mark Shuttleworth Prefers GPL V3 srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 9:19pm
Story Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 11.04 falko 08/05/2011 - 7:55pm
Story The Tale of Red Hat's Name srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:54pm
Story Why Not Linux? srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:53pm
Story The Oddest Game To Be Powered By Unigine srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:50pm
Story SimplyMEPIS 11 Final Released srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:48pm
Story My Week with Ubuntu Natty Narwhal srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:47pm
Story Will Linux Mint outdo the popularity of Ubuntu? srlinuxx 1 08/05/2011 - 3:44pm
Story Two new books by Richard Stallman srlinuxx 3 08/05/2011 - 9:29am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 4:18am

OpenOffice Base: Converting data and files from Access

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice's Base tool provides an open source alternative to proprietary Microsoft Access. But if you need to use both, it's nice to be able to move data back and forth between applications. In this tip, OpenOffice expert and instructor Solveig Haugland explains how to convert Access files to OpenOffice. She also describes a workaround for changing field orders and discusses how to group items in OpenOffice.

Pragmatic Questions about Binary-Only Drivers

Filed under
Linux

The perpetual debate over the legality, practicality, and wisdom of using, distributing, producing, and supporting binary-only drivers flared up again recently. This issue raises passionate debates, and those debates often walk the lines of a false dilemma: freedom versus pragmatism.

Quake cuts off much of Asia Internet

Filed under
Web

Internet and phone services have been disrupted across much of Asia on Wednesday after an earthquake damaged undersea cables, leaving one of the world's most tech-savvy regions in a virtual blackout.

AIX 5L LDAP user management: Active Directory client support

Filed under
News

Get an overview of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol- (LDAP) related enhancements in the AIX 5L operating system V5.3 TL5 update. This lets clients configure and manage multiple systems with a single set of user identity configuration information, and it simplifies system administration.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to View Hidden Files and Folders in Ubuntu File Browser

  • Change the GRUB Menu Timeout on Ubuntu
  • Show the GRUB Menu by Default on Ubuntu
  • Antivirus on Ubuntu with Avast!
  • How-to get your removable device mounted under an explicit and persistent name
  • Using the Root Account on Debian
  • Creating Filesystems in Linux

  • Rebuilding the Directory for TexInfo
  • Using Gnonlin with GStreamer and Python

  • Configure Wireless From The Command Line

Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the Christmas period I installed Ubuntu 5.10 (Edgy Eft) on my MacBook under Parallels, and I have to say that it’s the most likeable Linux distribution I’ve tried so far.

The Ultimate Distro

Filed under
Linux

The name of Gaël Duval's new distro, Ulteo, with its hint of the word "ultimate", smacks of a certain ambition. But Duval probably means it in the sense that it is the last distribution you will ever need to install, because thereafter it will "self-upgrade automatically," as the announcement of the alpha release put it. Ease-of-use has been a constant theme in Duval's work.

Ubuntu 6.10 (EdgyEft) vs. SUSE 10.1 on an HP Pavilion dv2000

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Lee commented that the HP Pavilion dv2000 is well supported by Ubuntu/Kubuntu Linux 6.10 (aka EdgyEft). In particular, he mentioned that sound worked, and the extra row of blue-lit multimedia buttons at the top works. That sounded very interesting, so I decided to have a try. I use Gnome, not KDE, as my desktop, so I chose to look at Ubuntu, not Kubuntu (which Lee uses).

Finally user-friendly virtualization for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The upcoming 2.6.20 Linux kernel is bringing a nice virtualization framework for all virtualization fans out there. It's called KVM, short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine. This article tries to explain how it all works, in theory and practice, together with some simple benchmarks.

Linux - Room for Improvement

Filed under
Linux

This month's column was supposed to be a look at openSUSE 10.2. Here's what I have to report thus far: openSUSE 10.2 is the only distribution that has stubbornly refused to install on my current test machine, an older Dell Dimension 8100 desktop. But one obstacle has led to another, and so far I'm nowhere near the finish line. Here's my current wish list.

Editing Debian alternatives graphically with galternatives

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been tinkering under the hood only to discover later that you blew up one of your defaults? Say your default web-browser, so that when you click a link from email it opens Firefox instead of Konqueror or vice-versa. Well I know I have. Here we'll look at how to fix this, graphically.

Mark Shuttleworth: Plan, execute, DELIVER

Filed under
Ubuntu

We are a somewhat chaotic crowd, the software libre army. Thousands of projects (hundreds of thousands, if you consider Sourceforge as a reference point). Hundreds of thousands of contributing developers from virtually every country and timezone. We are a very loosely coupled bunch.

Gameforge get rights for Saga of Ryzom

Filed under
Gaming

Mediabiz reports that the German publisher Gameforge got all rights for Saga of Ryzom from the French game developer Nevrax. Nevrax will be merged with the new founded Gameforge SARL located in Paris.

Google Toolbar 3.0 beta improves browsing experience

Filed under
Software

The Google Toolbar 3 (GT3) beta for Firefox, released earlier this month, includes a slew of new features, including bookmarks, integration with Google Apps, and customizable buttons. I tested the toolbar with Firefox 2.0 and Flock 0.7.9. Once I had it installed, I signed out of Google services and signed in using the Google Toolbar sign-in feature

Why Microsoft/Novell is good for Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Being aware, as I am, of Microsoft's monopolisation endeavours, coupled with working in a Linux world inherently mistrustful of the software giant, it may seem strange that I believe the Microsoft/Novell agreement will be great for Linux. But I do. Why?

Display top CPU processes Using htop

Filed under
HowTos

htop is a very competent interactive process viewer for the shell, providing all the functionality - and more - that the top utility does, in an easier and more intuitive way. htop provides easy-to-use menus for most operations and also has support for using a mouse.

Creating a managed website—Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

Free software Content Management Systems (CMS) are capable of running most websites these days. Indeed, low initial costs and strong community-based support mean that many sites which can’t afford a proprietary CMS can now benefit from the facilities a CMS provides. I’ll get down to the nitty gritty of selecting a CMS, installing it and setting up and promoting your site.

Smarter YaST Control Center for openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Software

If you're annoyed by the openSUSE 10.2 YaST Control Center not remembering its last size (but starting always too small/with one column) as me, my home project in the openSUSE Build Service has a yast2-control-center package which does.

In search of perfect font rendering on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest challenges I’ve had with Linux is getting text to render simultaneously attractively and readably. The good news is, after a lot of tinkering, I think I’ve got it more or less down pat. What follows are some basic instructions as to what I did.

Keeping your system tidy: creating simple packages

Filed under
HowTos

Installing software on a GNU/Linux system is often as simple as opening a package management interface, selecting with the mouse which packages you want installed, and letting the package management system install the wanted packages—plus, any dependencies required for the package to run. But what can you do if you want to install software which is not already packaged in your distribution of choice, and you still want it to be registered in your package management system for easy maintenance?

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers