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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Open to Misinterpretation

Filed under
OSS

TuxDeluxe: Before "open source", before free software, there was software in the public domain. You could say that software in the public domain was truly free. The code was "open source" and the user had the right to take it, break it, appropriate it, re-use it, package it, sell it, re-brand and license it, or do what you will with it.

Ubuntu for Dummies ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Techzone: I came across an article Tech writers think Ubuntu is for morons. As this is at Jem Report, I cannot even ignore it. It listed some serious doubts about the capabilities of a Ubuntu user. Here is an attempt to explain/reword the points in the above article.

The pendulum has swung in the open source debate

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Once upon a time, the term "open source" was coined to save the free-software world from itself. Or, rather, from the free-software zealots. Today, I can't help but feel that the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction, where we're so self-satisfied with the money we're making off open source that we have neglected the essential freedoms that make open-source profit possible.

Desktop Backgrounds For Minimalist Window Managers Revisited

Filed under
HowTos

Caitlyn Martin: Back in February I wrote about using xli to add a desktop background of your choice to a minimalist window manager. It turns out that many distros include something a bit newer and perhaps better than xli. Esetroot can also be used to change the contents of the root window in X.

apt-listbugs: Lists critical bugs before each apt installation

Filed under
Software

DPotD: apt-listbugs is a tool designed to warn the user about critical bugs of packages that are about to be installed or upgraded. Once installed, each time you use aptitude or apt-get it will be run, and if it detects any critical bugs will stop to ask the user what to do.

New LyX document processor released, now with unicode!

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: The LyX graphical document processor is an open source program that users to focus on content rather than formatting (akin to how HTML is written when your formatting is taken care of in the CSS files).

OpenOffice.org Calc: Pivot tables by another name

Filed under
OOo

LinuxJournal: DataPilots are OpenOffice.org Calc's equivalent of what MS Excel and other spreadsheets call pivot tables. Under any name, they are a tool for extracting and summarizing the information contained in spreadsheet cells in a more convenient form. Using a DataPilot, you can immediately see relationships between different pieces of data.

Some KDE news: Decibel 0.5, Plasma Applet Browser and Kicker and Plasma

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: Decibel was released as version 0.5. At the same time a Plasma Applet Browser was introduced by Ivan Čukić. Also, it was once again made clear that we will see a kicker replacement for KDE 4.0 in time.

KDE4 is very attractive for software service companies

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: The next version of KDE4 will run natively on Mac OS X and Windows XP and Vista. This means that it is a very attractive platform for software development. No other cross-platform toolkit looks as good as Qt and has an equally appealing API.

Ubuntu Documentation Mentoring

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matthew East: The mentoring project for Ubuntu documentation is going really well - the mailing list has sprung back to life after several slow months and a number of new aspiring contributors with ideas and enthusiasm have come on the scene.

One Month On, GPLv3 Adoption Going Very Smoothly

Filed under
OSS

FSM: I recently read the discussion on the GCC development mailing list related to GCC's transition to GPLv3. Despite generating 172 emails, the transition was quite smooth actually.

Linux: Distributed Storage Subsystem

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Evgeniy Polyakov, listed as the ufs filesystem and w1 subsystem maintainer, announced the first release of his distributed storage subsystem, "which allows [you] to form storage on top of remote and local nodes, which in turn can be exported to another storage as a node to form tree-like storages."

Do we need an open hardware license?

Filed under
Hardware

linux.com: Nokia researcher Jamey Hicks recently proposed a Open Source Hardware License (OSHL) for approval by the Open Source Initiative (OSI). Is there a need for a hardware-specific license? If so, what makes hardware different from software?

Windows vs. Linux vs. OS X: CIO John Halamka Tests Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

cio.com: Last summer, CareGroup CIO John Halamka began looking for a viable alternative to the Microsoft Windows desktop operating system. Last July, he quit Windows cold turkey and used a MacBook running OS X as his sole computing machine to see how it stacked up against Windows. In August, he worked with two Linux distributions.

Launch Apps Automagically in Gnome

Filed under
Software

MaximumPC: Over the last couple of months, a lot of new Linux users have written in to ask how they can get apps to launch automatically in GNOME like they can in Windows. So rather than continue to answer everyone individually, here's an easy tutorial for everyone.

IDC: Patents Inhibit Open Source Adoption

Filed under
OSS

internetnews: "The potential for copyright and patent infringement is the No. 1 inhibitor right now for organizations in adopting more open source software in their organization," Lawton said in the afternoon conference call. "Close behind that is the availability of support."

Adult OLPC OS: Red Hat Global Desktop or Ubuntu Mobile?

Filed under
OLPC

OLPC News: Thinking about One Laptop Per Child commercial sales, specifically who would buy a "$100 laptop" when the XO retail price is more like $325 and the Sugar UI is designed for children, I wonder what adult operating system OLPC might bundle with the XO.

Turn your computer into a media center PC with GeeXBoX 1.1

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GeeXBoX, a small media center Linux live CD distribution, can run from any small device, such as a USB disk or a wallet CD-R, and can play both disk-based media like DVDs and online media like Icecast streams.

Tellico: manage your collection of CDs, coins and… wines

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: I don’t know a person that hasn’t collected anything in their life (particularly in childhood). Some people didn’t age out of this habit and their collections of books, CDs or coins have grown so much that they have problems managing these collections using only a sheet of paper and a pencil.

Rich-Client application Performance, Part 1

Filed under
News

In this first installment, you'll learn how to measure the performance of Eclipse-based Rich Client Platform (RCP) applications, determine if slowdowns are caused by CPU or I/O bottlenecks, and keep the UI thread idle to maintain responsiveness. Part 2 will address memory problems.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Nvidia Graphics Drivers Vulnerability in All Ubuntu Releases

It's time to update your Ubuntu Linux operating system if you have a Nvidia graphics card running the Nvidia Legacy 340 or 304 binary X.Org drivers provided on the official software repositories. Read more

Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance andd New Device From CompuLab

  • Long-term Embedded Linux Maintenance Made Easier
    The good old days when security breaches only happened to Windows folk are fading fast. Malware hackers and denial of service specialists are increasingly targeting out of date embedded Linux devices, and fixing Linux security vulnerabilities was the topic of several presentations at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in October. One of the best attended was “Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years” by Pengutronix kernel hacker Jan Lübbe. After summarizing the growing security threats in embedded Linux, Lübbe laid out a plan to keep long-life devices secure and fully functional. “We need to move to newer, more stable kernels and do continuous maintenance to fix critical vulnerabilities,” said Lübbe. “We need to do the upstreaming and automate processes, and put in place a sustainable workflow. We don’t have any more excuses for leaving systems in the field with outdated software.”
  • CompuLab Has Upgraded Their Small Form Factor "IPC" Line To Kabylake
    HARDWARE -- Our friends and Linux-friendly PC vendor, CompuLab, have announced a new "IPC" line-up of their small form factor computers now with Intel Kabylake processors. In the past on Phoronix we tested CompuLab's Intense-PC (IPC) and then the IPC2 with Haswell processors, among other innovative PCs from CompuLab. Now they are rolling out the IPC3 with Intel's latest Kabylake processors.
  • Fanless mini-PC runs Linux Mint on Kaby Lake
    Compulab launched a rugged “IPC3” mini-PC that runs Linux on dual-core, 7th Gen Core i7/i5 CPUs, and also debuted three GbE-equipped FACE expansion modules. Compulab has opened pre-orders starting at $693 for the first mini-PCs we’ve seen to offer the latest, 14nm-fabricated 7th Generation Intel Core “Kaby Lake” processors. The passively cooled, 190 x 160 x 40mm IPC3 (Intense PC 3), which is available in up to industrial temperature ranges, follows two generations of similarly sized IPC2 mini-PCs. There’s the still available, 4th Gen “Haswell” based IPC2 from 2014 and the apparently discontinued 5th Gen “Broadwell” equipped IPC2 from 2015.
  • Compulab IPC3 is a tiny, fanless PC with Intel Kaby Lake CPU
    Compulab is an Israeli company that makes small, fanless computers for home or commercial use. The company’s latest mini PC aimed at enterprise/industrial usage is called the IPC3, and it has a die-cast aluminum case with built-in heat sinks for passive cooling and measures about 7.4″ x 6.3″ x 1.6″.

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Imperium Galactica II: Alliances released for Linux & SteamOS, seems native too
    Imperium Galactica II: Alliances [GOG, Steam] just released for Linux & SteamOS and it looks like it's a native version. Note: My friends at GOG sent over a copy, so big thanks to them. There's no sign of DOSBox or Wine and I had no idea this game had ever been ported to Linux. Pretty awesome really for a game like this to get a proper Linux build when it gets a new release.
  • Nearly five years after the Kickstarter, Carmageddon still isn’t on Linux despite the stretch goal being reached
    The problem here, for me, is that they later did a revamp of the title called Carmageddon: Max Damage. This was to fix some problems, boost sales again and port it to consoles. Carmageddon: Max Damage also never made it to Linux. Fun fact, they actually released a trailer where they just run over a ton of penguins, make from that what you will: Not saying this was trolling the entire Linux gaming community, but it sure felt like it after their previous trolling attempts directed at our official Twitter account.
  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Client Stable Update with Promised Linux Changes, More
    Today Valve announced the availability of a new stable update of the Steam Client for all supported platforms, including the company's SteamOS operating system for Steam Machines, as well as GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. Bringing all the new features during the Beta stages of development, the new Steam Client update improves the interaction between the Steam runtime and your GNU/Linux distribution's libraries. This is a huge and long-anticipated milestone for the Steam Client, which, unfortunately, did not work out-of-the-box on all Linux-based operating systems.

Robolinux 8.7.1 Linux OS Is Out and It's Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie"

The developers of the Robolinux GNU/Linux distribution have announced today, January 18, 2017, the release and immediate availability of a new stable update based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series. Still offering a free installer, the Robolinux 8.7.1 "Raptor" edition is now available for download with the usual Cinnamon, MATE 3D, Xfce 3D, and LXDE flavors. It's based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.7.1 "Jessie" operating system, which means that it ships with its newest Linux 3.16 kernel and over 170 bug fixes and security patches. The GRUB bootloader and login screens have been refreshed too. Read more