Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A tale of two distros: openSUSE and Linux Mint srlinuxx 08/12/2011 - 6:13pm
Blog entry Big Bear's Helpful Hints-Google Docs Spreadsheets bigbearomaha 08/12/2011 - 6:02pm
Blog entry Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo bigbearomaha 08/12/2011 - 1:44pm
Story Install GNOME 3 (With Mint GNOME Shell Extensions) Or Mate On Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) falko 08/12/2011 - 10:28am
Story What’s going on in Fedora QA srlinuxx 08/12/2011 - 12:29am
Story Ubuntu 11.10 without Unity shell shock srlinuxx 08/12/2011 - 12:05am
Story Portable Software Center srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:44pm
Story More Extensions for GNOME srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:36pm
Story KDE Telepathy 0.2 srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:31pm
Blog entry Stop the US government trying to Own the internet.. fieldyweb 07/12/2011 - 9:57pm

New Linux Does Inclusive Virtualization

Filed under

The second Linux kernel release of 2007 is now available, further extending the virtualization and real-time capabilities of Linux.

Highlighting the Linux 2.6.21 update is the inclusion of the paravirt-ops paravirtualization interface, which enables multiple hypervisors to hook directly into Linux.

Debain WrEtch: review of an UnAmerican Linux system

Filed under

Debain is the only group of software developers who still believe that Richard Stallman invented programming. Everyone else now correctly credits Bill Gates for doing so. Debain developers hold themselves separate from the rest of the Linux community because of their pride in not stealing from other operating systems to build their version of Linux.

Microsoft To Release Silverlight To Open Source Community

Filed under

Microsoft Corporation may release part of the source code of its Silverlight technology to the open source community.

Compiz On Solaris X86 - Eye Candy For Solaris’s Desktop

Filed under

Want to have all that eye candy (desktop coolness) that we have on Linux on your Solaris box. It is still little rough on edges, but it is coming there slowly. Guess soon Solrais will have as stable packages available as there are for Linux distributions. Calc function tools

Filed under

Once you are comfortable with inputting functions and formulas, the next step is to learn how to automate the processes. Calc includes over half a dozen tools to help you manipulate functions and formulas, ranging from features for copying and reusing data to creating subtotals automatically to ones for varying information to help you find the answers that you need.

Spreading opportunity

Filed under

Growing up in Keizer, Justin Gallardo and Michael Burns learned about computers by taking them apart to see how they worked and by doing triage when their machines crashed.

Now the 20-year-old computer science majors at Oregon State University are working to ensure that children in developing countries have that same opportunity.

Your Momma Uses Linux

Filed under

Those of us who grew up in the seventies probably remember variations of this pejorative phrase. often aimed at either the schoolyard bully, or perhaps your best friend in jest. There was often no additional descriptor: just the first two words hanging there. The implication that your mother was... something left undescribed...

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 Available for Testing

Filed under

Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is now available for testing. New features in this development milestone of Mozilla Firefox 3 include the FUEL JavaScript library for extension developers, a redesigned Page Info window, improvements to offline application support and Gecko 1.9 bug fixes.

“I don’t know what Linux is but I don’t like it”

Filed under

In college, almost everyone has a personal computer. More and more people are using Macs - it seems that 10% of the class of 2007 uses Macs, whereas it appears that roughly half of freshman (class of 2010) are using Macs. I’ve used PCs, Macs, and lately a lot of Linux. I’ve even written my own operating system.

Free, Open, Eating Its Young

Filed under

The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) world is cram-full of interesting, smart, fun people. It's also full of trolls, jerks, and abusive wastes of time, and very confused when it comes to civility. A lot of FOSSers fall into the Five Geek Social Fallacies trap, especially the first two:

Geek Social Fallacy #1: Ostracizers Are Evil

XO laptop is fun for child's play

Filed under

The hardest thing about learning to use the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project's XO notebook PC is finding the right way to twist its antenna ears and open the display. Once you can see the screen, just follow the icons to write a note, snap a photo, or compose a tune.

Linux: Releasing With Known Regressions

Filed under

Following the release announcement of the 2.6.21 Linux kernel, Adrian Bunk noted that he no longer planned to track regressions. He explained, "if we would take 'no regressions' seriously, it might take 4 or 5 months between releases due to the lack of developer manpower for handling regressions.

The real tune on real time Linux

Filed under

Generally, I’m a fan of taking the high road. I’d much rather talk about what we do than talk about what the competition is doing. But sometimes you can’t let things slide…

Shiny Dolphin Mockups

Filed under

Nookie provided some Dolphin Mockups to show how he imagines Dolphin. While some of the enhancements do look a bit like a file manager of a certain wide spread operating system they do look good.

Nookie is a kbfx developer. I’m not sure why he produces Dolphin Mockups, but they look very slick and shiny anyway.

VDrift: Three confessions, an exaltation and a warning

Filed under

I don’t play racing games. I’ve been driving for decades, and so it’s not really that appealing. I mean, if I wanted to race a car, I’d just make the arrangements and do the real thing. A racing game just isn’t far enough detached from reality to amuse my sense of imagination. And I’m not a gearhead at all, so it’s only an oblique interest to start with.

Love and hate with Kommander

Filed under

Kommander is, IMHO, a great idea which needs a lot of technical improvements. The core idea is very good, but Kommander has many problems and bugs that need to be solved if it wants to be much more useful. I am currently using Kommander for a couple of things and fully acknowledge its power. There’s also a Kommander scripts section at

Ubuntu lays down the trademark law

Filed under

Trademarks have recently become something of an issue in open-source circles. Debian, for example, recently took exception to Mozilla's Firefox trademark rules and called its version of the popular browser, IceWeasel. So, Ubuntu has decided to address possible trademark issues by creating its own trademark policy.

17 Must-Have Free Apps for New Ubuntu Users

Filed under

If you haven't tried Ubuntu, the new Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn offers the PC user a chance to try out this open source software with little fear.

How to Rip DVD audio to mp3 or ogg

Filed under

You can extract sound from a DVD, one track at a time or a chapter at a time. Some simple command line examples should suffice to demonstrate how this is done.

First thing you need to do is make sure you have lsdvd and transcode installed:

sudo apt-get install lsdvd transcode

File Server Configuration in Debian Using Samba

Filed under

Samba is a suite of Unix applications that speak the SMB (Server Message Block) protocol. Many operating systems,including Windows and OS/2, use SMB to perform client-server networking. By supporting this protocol, Samba allows Unix servers to get in on the action, communicating with the same networking protocol as Microsoft Windows products.

Install Samba in Debian

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.