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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ballmer $7.7-Billion Skype Blunder srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 10:23pm
Story Mozilla Removes User Limit From Firefox 5 srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 10:20pm
Story Will Fedora Ever Learn? srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 10:18pm
Story CTK Arch: Fast and Furious srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 9:54pm
Story What’s happening in Edubuntu for Oneiric? srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 9:52pm
Story Wayland, X.Org For Ubuntu's Future srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 9:49pm
Story Samba XP Keynote, Jeremy's GPLv3 talk, & GPLv2/LGPLv3 srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 6:51pm
Story Linux Mint 11 RC Screenchots Tour srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 6:49pm
Story Fedora and Gnome 3, Ubuntu and Unity, will openSUSE and KDE benefit? srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 5:25pm
Story 50 Top Linux Distributions srlinuxx 10/05/2011 - 5:23pm

Gmail problem limited, Google says

Filed under
Google

A problem with Google Inc.'s free e-mail service that has users increasingly reporting that their data and accounts are being irretrievably deleted is an isolated one, the internet search giant says.

2006: The year the FSF reached out to the community

Filed under
OSS

At the start of 2006, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was largely inward-looking, focused on the GNU Project and high-level strategic concerns such as licensing. Now, without abandoning these issues, the FSF had transformed into an openly activist organization, reaching out to its supporters and encouraging their participation in civic campaigns often designed to enlist non-hackers in their causes. Yet what happened seems to bemuse even FSF employees.

Suse 10.2, part 4: KDE's Konqueror

Filed under
SUSE

I've grown to really like KDE. Working with KDE is, in a word, fun. Yes, fun. Enjoyable. A pleasure to work with. Easy to approach. Provides pleasant surprises and wonderful answers to problems I never new I really had. That's why I keep posting about Suse and KDE, especially this release.

Linux is the Future

Filed under
Interviews

Mark Shuttleworth gave an interview to Ukrainian online journal ‘Computer Review’ (Kompyuternoye Obozreniye), where he shared his thoughts about his life, Ubuntu, Space, Open source, Linux, Microsfot-Novell deal and other interesting things.

CIO study finds Linux ready for prime-time

Filed under
Linux

Nearly half of all enterprises will be running mission-critical business applications on Linux in five years' time. That's according to survey of IT directors, VPs and CIOs carried out by Saugatuck Research, which questioned 133 businesses worldwide.

Firefox man loses faith in Google

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF

BLAKE ROSS, one of the key people behind the Firefox browser, says that he is losing faith in the antics of the search engine Google.

Right-Click to Launch Custom Scripts with Nautilus

Filed under
HowTos

You might remember my previous post about how to actually use the Create Document option on your desktops right-click menu. Today I’ll go over how to create custom scripts to launch from that same panel. This can go for any frequently used program, custom scripts that you’ve written, etc. This tutorial is rated E for everyone!

Linux Tackles Old Foes With New Tools

Filed under
Linux

Linux users have much to look forward to in 2007, beginning with the end of the SCO saga, which has raged on since 2003. The year will also mark the birth of a new GPL and a new flagship enterprise Linux distribution from the current enterprise Linux leader, Red Hat.

Free software New Year's resolutions

Filed under
OSS

As the New Year swiftly approaches, it’s time to write those resolutions. From exercising more, eating fewer snacks, or remembering to call your mother on her birthday, we all think of various ways we can improve our lives, by starting good habits or ending bad ones. I’d like to suggest some resolutions that will assist you in your pursuit of free software.

“Commercial” is not the opposite of Free-Libre / Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

When I talk with with other people about Free-Libre / Open Source Software (FLOSS), I still hear a lot of people mistakenly use the term “commercial software” as if it had the opposite meaning of FLOSS (aka open source software, Free-Libre Software, or OSS/FS).

Novell: We're a 'mixed-source' company

Filed under
SUSE

Novell's controversial pact with Microsoft reflects the desire of the number two Linux seller to position itself as a mixed-source company. Speaking to ZDNet Asia last week, Maarten Koster, the newly-appointed president of Novell Asia-Pacific, noted that the company positions itself in the market differently from its rivals.

Linux: Chasing Down Data Corruption

Filed under
Linux

In a couple of fascinating threads on the lkml, Linus Torvalds has been working with several other kernel developers to try and track down a difficult data corruption bug. Linus posted a test-program that's capable of consistently triggering the data corruption, so it's a matter of time before the bug is found and fixed.

Book Review - GIMP 2 For Photographers

Filed under
Reviews

If you are doing digital photography, and these days, who isn’t, then chances are you will be in need of an image editing program. If you have the money, you can spend around $600 for a copy of Photoshop or, for less functionality, you can get Photoshop Elements for about $100. But what if you are just starting out, or on a tight budget, or you work in a Linux environment?

Startup is counting on open source to launch its MMOG

Filed under
OSS

Brazil-based Hoplon Infotainment is a startup game developer and an open source shop. Its upcoming first product, Taikodom, is a "massively multiplayer online game (MMOG)" that includes elements of science fiction and magic. Hundreds of thousands of online users can play an MMOG at the same time, but that requires a lot of server power. Hoplon called on open source tools for its software development needs, and IBM to help it provide the bandwidth and CPU strength it requires.

SuperTux 0.3 is cool

Filed under
Gaming

I feel it is my happy duty to make all of you code less, by mentioning that the SuperTux people created a new release: 0.3.0. They apparently changed most of their rendering engine and physics code, and lots of other stuff changed with it. It looks much better than the already incredible 0.1.3 version that I played a lot.

Is Linux Ready for the SMB Space?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: How valid are these considerations today?

'Old' Linux Kernels Keep Coming

Filed under
Linux

For many in the world, it's the time of year for wrapping up the old and moving ahead with the new. That's not necessarily the case for Linux, though. For the Linux kernel, what's old is new again with the new releases of the 2.6.16.37 and 2.4.34 kernels.

Linux group wants software patents made null

Filed under
Misc

An open source advocacy group has filed a friend-of-the-court brief in a Microsoft Corp. case asking the U.S. Supreme Court to invalidate all software patents.

Two views of the 3D desktop

Filed under
Software

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been exploring two available 3D environments: Croquet and Project Looking Glass. The two projects take distinctly different approaches to their 3D environments.

Red Hat's next Linux due before March

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat plans to ship the next version of its premium Linux product on February 28, debuting major virtualization technology but missing an earlier deadline by about two months.

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